How to Install PrestaShop on Ubuntu 18.04

2019-03-25 02:43:22

Redox OS 0.5 Released With New C Library Written In Rust

2019-03-25 00:32:01

Stable kernels 5.0.4, 4.19.31, 4.14.108, 4.9.165 , 4.4.177 and 3.18.137

2019-03-25 00:20:38

Linux 5.0.4 I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.4 kernel. All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Linux 4.19.31 Linux 4.14.108 Linux 4.9.165 Linux 4.4.177 Linux 3.18.137 read more

PyPy 7.1 As The Well Known Alternative Python Implementation

2019-03-25 00:14:28

Last month brought the release of PyPy 7.0 as the JIT-ed performance-optimized Python implementation. PyPy 7.0 brought alpha Python 3.6 support, an updated CFFI module, and other enhancements. Out now is PyPy 7.1 as its successor...

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 807

2019-03-25 00:09:13

This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: Pardus 17.5News: New features in the Budgie desktop, a GUI for browsing sysctl values on FreeBSD, Debian archives older releasesQuestions and answers: Tracking down the user who changed a fileReleased last week: Solus 4.0, Tails 3.13Torrent corner: BSD Router Project, Clonezilla, GParted,....

Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5

2019-03-25 00:08:04

Tags: GOL PodcastThe Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5 is here once again! Another week, another ton of news and so here's your bite-sized take at a few interesting topics for those struggling to keep up. As usual, it has a video to give your eyes as well as your ears a feast or just the plain audio to listen to on the go. Watch video on YouTube.com MP3: Download | RSS Feed   OGG: Download | RSS Feed   Topics covered, click me Oxygen Not Included System Shock reboot System Shock 3 Albion Online Second Earth We happy few   SteamOS Atari VCS Google Stadia

Linux 5.1-rc2 Kernel Released

2019-03-24 23:27:03

Linus Torvalds has announced the second weekly release candidate for Linux 5.1...

How to choose special characters, revisited

2019-03-24 21:57:27

There's no euro symbol on my keyboard, but I can enter that character in any document or in my terminal with Ctrl + Shift + u +20ac. I can do the same with "umlaut a" (00e4) and "cedilla c" (00e7) and the degree symbol (00b0) and... Wait! Who am I kidding? There's no way I can remember all those Unicode code points. For this reason I wrote a script for quick and easy retrieval of my most-often-used special characters from a GUI.

Instantbox: Spins up temporary Linux systems with webshell access from a browser

2019-03-24 21:34:24

Comments

Instantbox/instantbox: Get a clean, ready-to-go Linux box in seconds

2019-03-24 21:34:24

Comments

Lumotive spreads word on its lidar system for autonomous vehicles

2019-03-24 20:12:13

A Seattle-based company is talking up a storm about solid state lidar powered by liquid crystal metasurface (LCM) technology. The company CTO is proclaiming the LCM chip as "the holy grail of LiDAR."

Jim Zemlin’s Linux Foundation Still Does Not Care About Linux Desktops

2019-03-24 19:34:30

We are saddened to see that the largest body associated with Linux (the kernel and more) is not really eager to see GNU/Linux success; it’s mostly concerned about its bottom line (about $100,000,000 per annum)

Top 5 Linux Apps For Writing

2019-03-24 19:05:01

Top 5 Linux Apps For Writing. Keeping in mind that not all Linux apps for writing are created equal nor do they each provide the same functionality. Today I’ll provide you with my top five Linux app picks for writing. ## Support the Patreon, now with new Just Ask Matt support options – https://www.patreon.com/freedompenguin ## Traditional writing: # Libre Office Writer for Linux Writing – Best for articles, etc. All the bells and whistles. https://www.libreoffice.org/discover/writer # FocusWriter for Linux Writing – Best for articles, etc. Distraction free writing tool. https://gottcode.org/focuswriter/ ## Book writing: # Bibisco for Linux Writing – For writing books. Character creation is one of its best features. http://www.bibisco.com # Asciidoc FX for Linux Writing – For writing books. For those who love a an IDE approach to book writing.121 https://asciidocfx.com ## Markdown writing: # Ghostwriter for Linux Writing – Both distraction free writing in markdown, while also allow you to access more robust features like drag/drop imaging inserts, theming and formatting. https://wereturtle.github.io/ghostwriter/ Continue reading Top 5 Linux Apps For Writing at Freedom Penguin.

Some Additional Chrome vs. Firefox Benchmarks With WebRender, 67 Beta / 68 Alpha

2019-03-24 17:15:19

A few days ago I posted some Chrome vs. Firefox benchmarks using the latest Linux builds. Some readers suggested Firefox could be more competitive if forcing WebRender usage and/or moving to the latest nightly builds, so here are some complementary data sets looking at such combinations...

Stellarium v0.19.0 has been released!

2019-03-24 17:14:36

The major changes of this version: 5 new sky cultures Refactoring the code: many improvements and fixes Added many DSO textures Many improvements for Scripting Engine Thank you very much to community for bug reports, feature requests and contributions! Also: Free Software Planetarium Stellarium 0.19.0 Released (How to Install) read more

Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 18.04

2019-03-24 17:11:33

In this tutorial, we'll explain how to set up a static IP address on Ubuntu 18.04.

nikita 0.3 released

2019-03-24 16:38:37

We are pleased to announce that we have released 0.3 of nikita. A high level overview of the work that has been carried out is detailed in: https://gitlab.com/OsloMet-ABI/nikita-noark5-core/blob/master/NEWS.md You can also get an insight into the the work from the developer-notes https://gitlab.com/OsloMet-ABI/nikita-noark5-core/blob/master/docs/general/developer-notes.md This is very much a incremental release. We have a had a look backwards on the code and worked on bug-fixes and undertaken improvements. We introduce the browse capability, which is useful when discussing structural issues with data. We have started support for pagination and undertaken some experimental work on block chain integration. The project has also spent a lot of energy on the interface standard and we drafted a description on how business specific metadata should be supported. We have a good number of pull requests in, on clarifying issues with the standard. We have also tested Evrys Noark core that claims compliance with the interface standard and are in dialog about issues there. This has shown that there is a further need to standardise the entry point to a Noark API. We are discussing a lot of interesting stuff going forward and you are welcome to join us on #nikita. Going forward we are working on export, import, pagination, odata and business specific metadata. We are also looking at how a private collection of documents can be sorted and imported to a Noark core via the interface standard. Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the project! Also: Release 0.3 of free software archive API system Nikita announced read more

nano-4.0 is released

2019-03-24 16:21:00

2019.03.24 - GNU nano 4.0 "Thy Rope of Sands" • An overlong line is no longer automatically hard-wrapped. • Smooth scrolling (one line at a time) has become the default. • A newline character is no longer automatically added at end of buffer. • The line below the title bar is by default part of the editing space. • Option --breaklonglines (-b) turns automatic hard-wrapping back on. • Option --jumpyscrolling (-j) gives the chunky, half-screen scrolling. • Option --finalnewline (-f) brings back the automatic newline at EOF. • Option --emptyline (-e) leaves the line below the title bar unused. • and now do a linewise scroll instead of a findnext. • Any number of justifications can be undone (like all other operations). • When marked text is justified, it becomes a single, separate paragraph. • Option --guidestripe=<number> draws a vertical bar at the given column. • Option --fill=<number> no longer turns on automatic hard-wrapping. • When a line continues offscreen, it now ends with a highlighted ">". • The halfs of a split two-column character are shown as "[" and "]". • A line now scrolls horizontally one column earlier. • The bindable functions 'cutwordleft' and 'cutwordright' were renamed to 'chopwordleft' and 'chopwordright' as they don't use the cutbuffer. • The paragraph-jumping functions were moved from Search to Go-to-Line. • Option --rebinddelete is able to compensate for more misbindings. • Options --morespace and --smooth are obsolete and thus ignored. • The --disable-wrapping-as-root configure option was removed. Also: GNU Nano 4.0 Text Editor Released read more

Kodachi OS Review

2019-03-24 16:13:02

Kodachi is a free Debian based Operating System designed specially for security, anonymity and privacy. It has built in anonymity, cryptography and anti forensics solutions. If compared with others, its a better alternative for its competitor Operating Systems like Tails and Qubes. It has a complete suite of tools and utilities that one needs to secure his privacy and anonymity on the internet. When Kodachi boots up, it changes your MAC Address, establishes TOR (The Onion Routing) connection through a paid VPN and all of the internet traffic has to go through TOR plus VPN with DNS encryption. Also it changes your MAC Address regularly after a while to avoid detection and tracking on the internet. Kodachi runs on Live USB, CD, DVD and can be used with USB persistence, also it can be installed on Hard Disk Drive but that’s not recommended. Kodachi is entirely anti forensics, it leaves no traces of your activity on host system and can’t be traced back. It also has wipe RAM option in Panic Room Panel to clear Temporary Memory. Followings are some of its amazing features which aren’t provided by any other Operating System read more

Security: Flawed Government Sites, Windows Disasters, and an SSH Tarpit

2019-03-24 15:41:34

Thousands of security flaws found on UK government websites   Of the 3220 domain names registered under the .gov.uk domain ending – encompassing everything from central government departments to local and district councils – 524 have unpatched vulnerabilities. In total, the 524 insecure websites, including the National Archives, the Scottish prosecution service and the Health and Safety Executive, have about 7200 vulnerabilities between them. [Windows] Ransomware Forces Two Chemical Companies to Order ‘Hundreds of New Computers’ [iophk: "those who signed off on deploying Windows in a production environment need to be brought to justice;"]   On the day of the attack, some of the companies’ Windows computers were hit with a blue screen error and their files encrypted, said the current employee, who asked to remain anonymous as they were not authorized to speak to the press.     Endlessh: an SSH Tarpit   This program opens a socket and pretends to be an SSH server. However, it actually just ties up SSH clients with false promises indefinitely — or at least until the client eventually gives up. After cloning the repository, here’s how you can try it out for yourself (default port 2222): read more

Licensing: Amazon AWS, CAST and Free and Open source Software (FOSS) Licences

2019-03-24 14:51:54

Amazon Ups Its Game On Open Source, Elastic Shares Down By 5% After the year of ups and downs with its relationship with Elastic, AWS has launched its independent library of open source-code known as Open Distro. With its Elasticsearch distribution, Amazon Web Services sends more shockwaves through open-source software Nobody really knows what lies ahead for the future of open-source software as cloud computing becomes the dominant force in enterprise tech, but the times are definitely changing. Just about anything that Amazon Web Services does has massive ripple effects throughout this world, and last week’s decision to release its own open-source version of Elasticsearch, a popular engine for searching and analyzing internal company data maintained by newly public company Elastic, was no exception. AWS open-source czar Adrian Cockcroft was careful to describe the Open Distro for Elasticsearch as a distribution, rather than a fork, but the move underscores a fundamental conflict between companies based around open-source projects and the growing popularity of cloud service providers. Debunking the open source sustainability myth [Ed: Mac Asay siding with the exploitation and the closing of code (former employer)] Open source vendors are draping themselves in the flag of "sustainability" to try to garner support against AWS—it's not working. Here's why open source sustainability is fake news. Open source a silent killer? CAST talks about their new alliance with Software Heritage [Ed: That typical pretense that proprietary software does not have security issues (it has back doors too) and proprietary licensing is somehow "safe" and "predictable" (the opposite is true). FUD by omission.] Combine IP lawsuits with the aforementioned security concerns and organisations could really have a problem on their hands, which is why the market for software composition analysis (SCA) tools is picking up a bit of steam. SCA tools aim to provide a ‘diagnostic' view of the all the OSS components that exist within a business and determine whether or not there is a vulnerability or particular licencing requirement to consider. CAST is one of these vendors, and they've just announced a new alliance with source code archival not-for-profit Software Heritage, with the aim of taking SCA one step further. Essentially CAST is working with Software Heritage, who oversee the world's largest open archive of software source code, to develop a ‘provenance index' which allows users to trawl through Software Heritage's archive using CAST's Highlight SCA software to identify the original occurrence of any given source file, and all of its subsequent occurrences. CAST says this will allow users to assess any third-party source code within Software Heritage's library of five billion plus known source code files, weeding out and vulnerabilities and licencing risks they present. Types of open source software and Licenses Free and Open source software (FOSS) is a very popular term in the world of software because their license distribution terms. There are many open source software in the market. Many people may think that the most obvious feature of open source software is free, but it is not the case. They widely recognize because the availability of source code of the open source software available for anyone to modify. It means any developer or community can change the software to improve, adds features, fixing of bugs, distribution under own branding and more. However, the open source system also has copyright, which is also protected by law. While using/distribution of open source projects for some commercial or personal use, the users should not only indicate the products are from open source software and the name of the source code writer but also submit the modified products to open source software community, otherwise the modified products can be regarded as an infringement. The indifference of copyright awareness is the biggest obstacle to the development of open source. read more

How to Secure Nginx with Let’s Encrypt on Ubuntu 18.04

2019-03-24 14:48:35

How to Secure Nginx with Let’s Encrypt on Ubuntu. HTTPS ensures that no information is passed as plain text. It’s recommended to use SSL certificates on all websites.

GNU Nano 4.0 Text Editor Released

2019-03-24 14:46:32

For fans of GNU's Nano text editor, version 4.0 was released this Sunday where overlong lines are no longer automatically hard-wrapped, smooth scrolling has been enabled by default, and other improvements made...

Graphics: OpenXR, Code From Nvidia, OpenChrome

2019-03-24 14:37:24

How OpenXR could glue virtual reality's fragmenting market together OpenXR is out to change all that. With Monday’s release of the OpenXR provisional specification, Khronos’ open source working group wants to create a world where developers can code their VR/AR experience for a single API, with the confidence that the resulting application will work on any OpenXR-compliant headset. Nvidia developing an 'autonomous car driver's license' based on its tech - Roadshow The company is working on standardized "driver's license" testing for self-driving cars based on a new open-source algorithm. Nvidia GPUs for data science, analytics, and distributed machine learning using Python with Dask Nvidia has been more than a hardware company for a long time. As its GPUs are broadly used to run machine learning workloads, machine learning has become a key priority for Nvidia. In its GTC event this week, Nvidia made a number of related points, aiming to build on machine learning and extend to data science and analytics. OpenChrome DRM Driver Still Inching Along, Now Connected To New TTM Code This is great for improving memory management within this open-source VIA graphics driver though wasn't a blocker for getting merged -- on that front, the primary blocker has been OpenChrome adopting atomic mode-setting interfaces besides having enough general code review. Kevin Brace remains the lone free software developer still working on this OpenChrome driver and he's been working on this new TTM allocator code with hopes of re-using it by other vintage graphics cards. read more

FOSS in Net/CMS: Decentralized 'Social Networks', 'Web 3.0', Apache and eLife

2019-03-24 14:15:47

Top 5 decentralized social networks Diaspora: It's been around for awhile and has more than a million users. Servers are independently run, and users own their data. Minds: This open source network has more than two million users and prides itself on a lack of censorship. The network focuses on news feeds, blogs, groups, and general discovery features. It uses peer-to-peer advertising and allows you to monetize your content. Mastodon: Probably the most familiar and most similar to Twitter, it operates on open source servers and has a 500 character limit. It uses anti-abuse tools, and moderators may step in quick. Sola: You don't follow anyone with this network. AI and user reaction spread information, trying to match quality content with people who would be interested in it. Any user can host a Sola node. It prides itself on being immune to blocking and censorship. Sola splits money it makes from ads, user payments, and partnerships with all of its users. Manyverse: This one stores data on user devices instead of servers and syncs using a platform called Scuttlebutt—this makes it usable offline. Data can even be synced directly between devices over Bluetooth. How open source is making the move to Web 3.0 easier When HTTP first launched, it revolutionized how we interacted with the web. But the technology has not been able to keep up with the increasing data demands of advancements in AI, the rise of IoT and all the technologies that have allowed the tech sector to boom. With more data being packaged, processed and stored on the web than ever before, the drawbacks of HTTP have become abundantly clear. Web 3.0 represents a paradigm shift in the way users interact with, transport and store data in a truly decentralized manner. Answering the call for improved security protocols, especially for personal data, is one of the highest priorities for Web 3.0. By putting data protections back into the hands of the user, individuals will have more control over the data they produce – and how businesses can access and use that data. The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® CloudMonkey® v6.0 The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Unomi™ as a Top-Level Project Powerful Open Source Customer Data Platform in use at Al-Monitor, Altola, Jahia, and Yupiik, among others. The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache Unomi as a Top-Level Project Apache Unomi Could Prove a Major Customer Data Platform Disruptor Does your business need a Customer Data Platform (CDP) to store customer insights, such as behavioural data, or handle visitor profile management? Typically enterprises needing this kind of resource have had to pay for closed source proprietary software – open source alternatives are not thick on the ground. That means a: paying for a subscription; b: little configuration flexibility and c: few, if any, commercial CDPs offer integrators the genuine ability to build in a user interface for customers that lets them manage privacy, in a world in which that is becoming both a customer concern and regulatory priority apropos GDPR. eLife Unveils Open Source Platform for Submissions and Peer Review eLife joined forces with the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko) for the first release of Libero Reviewer, an open source submission and peer-review platform that supports eLife’s editorial process. Other organizations can use the components of this solution as is or adapt them to meet their requirements. read more

Deception, FUD and Entryism/Openwashing

2019-03-24 14:10:59

M&E Journal: Embracing Open-Source Through Automation [Ed: The term "open source" gets thrown around quite a lot these days] Media & Entertainment Services Alliance (MESA) advances new technologies that are enabling the digital transformation of media & entertainment. Groundbreaker Award Winners Predict Trends In Big Data, Serverless Java, And Open Source Careers [Ed: Oracle as "king" of "open source"? The Top 10 Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities You Should Know [Ed: Microsoft-connected WhiteSource does not write about back doors in every single thing Microsoft makes; instead it focuses on Linux having bugs] C is least secure programming language, claims study [Ed: According to Microsoft-connected WhiteSource] The 3 least secure programming languages [Ed: Always trying to associate FOSS with insecurity.] In debates over the best and worst programming languages to learn, security is often a factor used to support one language or discredit another, according to a Tuesday report from WhiteSource. But which languages are the most and least secure in the end? WhiteSource Joins OASIS's Static Analysis Standards Technical Committee [Ed: Is WhiteSource the new Black Duck (which got bought)?] Sorting through open source license risks [Ed: Microsoft 'proxy' Black Duck is still badmouthing FOSS licences] ImageSharp: Funding an Open Source Project [Ed:"Recently ImageSharp decided to change their license from Apache to the AGPLv3/Commercial dual license model." So openwashing of proprietary software with .NET trap of Microsoft] How to use Glimpse in ASP.Net Core [Ed: A sure way to become dependent on Microsoft] LinkedIn donates its Open19 specs to the Open Compute Project [Ed: Surveillance company Microsoft and its LinkedIn spying branch are openwashing by sending "specs" -- not code -- to a Microsoft openwashing ploy/stunt. There are some more new examples of this kind.] Data center technology now must fit into tighter, and in almost all cases far more challenging, spaces. Doing so in an open and repeatable manner is vital. WinTUN: Windows Finally Gets A Good TUN Driver & It's Open-Source [Ed: Phoronix no longer about UNIX/Linux -- part of a trend. Some things that are relevant only to Microsoft have a section there, for instance when something gets ported to Windows.] Swim Open Sources Platform That Challenges Conventional Wisdom in Distributed Computing [Ed: "They plan to follow an "open core" model" because Swim is proprietary software with "free bait"; more like openwashing] Open source software helps researchers extract key insights from huge sensor datasets [Ed: This requires proprietary software MATLAB so how "open" can it really be considered?] Professor Andreas Schütze and his team of experts in measurement and sensor technology at Saarland University are making available a free data processing tool that represents the very essence of a large number of their research projects. The software package - called simply 'Dave' - is a MATLAB toolbox that allows rapid evaluation of signals, pattern recognition and data visualization when processing huge datasets. The free software enables very large volumes of data, such as those produced by modern sensor systems, to be processed, analysed and visually displayed very rapidly, so that researchers can optimize their measurement systems interactively. read more

Has Microsoft Changed?

2019-03-24 14:05:01

Microsoft’s billion-dollar PR department would like everyone to know that they have shed their old ways and evolved into a hip and woke gentle giant, but have they really? There is currency in being viewed this way in the public eye and public relations department would like you to believe this about X company because of the trust it fosters. Further, it is also the job of any public relations team to distract us from such and many others that contradict said narrative. In PR and good ol’ fashion propaganda alike, such tactics are referred to as spin. And when a company such as Microsoft employs a former marine and Defense Information School alumni to spin their web, facilitate their social wetwork, and maintain dossiers on journalists (an act of intimidation), it may be wise to remain skeptical. As such and rather than focusing on the ambiguous notion of change popularized by zealous employees raving in unison with fan sites shilled by PC ads masquerading as media outlets, it may be wise to highlight a few mainstay behaviors that Microsoft of old has been notorious for and see if they are existent today instead. From there, we can decide for ourselves whether Microsoft is truly the woke, edgy and reformed tech company that their PR and marketing departments would love everyone to believe or if they’re the same law firm with a software problem that they’ve always been with some minor aesthetic changes. [...] It often goes overlooked, but legal departments can carry as much or more weight than the office of the CEO and this is certainly not an exception for a company founded by the son of a prominent attorney. However, it’s also overlooked how much lawyers generally suck at change; go work for a few law firms if you doubt this. That said and despite Microsoft’s hip new CEO, Brad Smith, one of the largest individual shareholders of Microsoft, has been working within their office of the general counsel since the ‘90s, was named their general counsel towards the conclusion of their embarrassing anti-trust case with the US, and is now their Chief Legal Officer. As a consequence of their legal victories and the billions in revenue made possible through Brad Smith’s leadership, it is almost irrational to think that Microsoft’s legal department has changed as they have no incentive to do this. When considering Brad Smith’s clear specialty in the realms of damage control and anti-competition, even approached by Facebook recently, it is difficult to say whether Microsoft has changed much or if they just have the best (dirtiest?) lawyer in the room. After all and just as you tend to stop having to call your traffic attorney as much when you slow down and stop speeding, Microsoft wouldn’t need the Jose Baez of anti-competition on their payroll if they weren’t up to the same antics that got them in trouble in the first place. As a result of this, Microsoft Licensing, still overseen by the aforementioned Brad Smith, is still a complex, ever-changing labyrinth that is streamlined to ensnare businesses and add cost at every interchange. Even Azure, the lynchpin of their future, is a licensing hellscape of sorts that appears to borrow heavily from these same practices. Although Microsoft claims to be an equal opportunity company that is in the court of women now, 99% of sexual harassment and gender discrimination claims made by highly educated and accomplished women with everything to lose have been found to be meritless and are snuffed out by their HR and employee relations investigations team (ERIT) which Brad Smith also oversees. For what it’s worth, Kathleen Hogan, VP of HR at Microsoft, would like you to know that only 10% of discrimination and 50% of harassment claims are found to be hogwash, which is still garbage. [...] Despite their layoffs, aesthetic changes, and acquisitions though, Microsoft still appears to be employing the same people that they always have, especially within their highest ranks. In turn, these same people appear to be employing the same sort of employee required to build the same core suite of products that necessitate the same partner distribution network, the same marketing ploys, the same lock-in nature, and the same legal clout that they have been dependent on for decades to make this all possible, leaving little else to be changed beyond the paint on the walls. read more

Server: SUSE, IBM, Google and TriggerMesh

2019-03-24 13:43:53

Is open source lock-in possible? [Ed: Well, it is possible, but a lot cheaper to exit and a lot less likely, too] Earlier this week, open source software company SuSE announced that it is strengthening its presence in the Asia-Pacific region following its acquisition by growth investor EQT from Micro Focus. Well-known for its SuSE Linux distro that got me into Linux during my student years, SuSE is now Europe’s leading Linux distribution, thanks in part to its German roots, but faces strong competition from its bigger US rival Red Hat. The two open source software companies have similar offerings, starting with Linux for the infrastructure piece, to container orchestration and OpenStack in the platform layer. But unlike Red Hat, which has Red Hat Ansible under its fold, SuSE does not appear to have a commercial version of the Ansible open source automation tool. SUSE contrasts proprietary VMware with its open-source offering Open source company SUSE has taken a pot-shot at cloud infrastructure and business mobility vendor VMware, contrasting the latter's proprietary, closed-source offering with the OpenStack Cloud that it sells. A blog post by Ryan Hagen, consulting manager, Global SUSE Services, said that VMware owned the virtualisation market and had used its dominance "to proliferate into other parts of the data centre and create a very sticky situation that you have no way to escape". Here’s how CIOs can address server, open source bottlenecks while implementing AI Updated PowerAI toolkit for POWER9 is now available for the first time on Red Hat, including Tensorflow, Caffe, Torch, Theano, and more of the open source community’s most popular deep learning frameworks accessible with an intuitive GUI interface. This makes PowerAI the first commercially supported AI software offering for Red Hat. SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Sandboxed API This week’s highlighted open-source project aims to make it less burdensome to create sandboxes of C/C++ libraries. Google’s Sandboxed API (SAPI) was made open-source earlier this week. In addition, it also made its core sandboxing project, Sandbox2, available as part of the Sandboxed API. SAPI works by creating an almost-identical stub API after security policies are set up and library interfaces are created. The API forwards calls to the real library running in a sandboxed environment by using a custom RPC layer. Safely play around with new software in Google’s open source Sandboxed API Software isolation isn’t a punishment; it’s a way to make sure your shiny new program that you picked up off of the internet plays nicely with your system and isn’t riddled with malware. Thanks to the newly open sourced Sandboxed API, developers can test out new options without putting their system at risk. Sandboxed API (SAPI) automatically generates sandboxes for C/C++ libraries. Security is not an afterthought with this project; each SAPI library utilizes a tightly defined security policy. While it’s only designed to handle part of a binary, the Sandboxed API can be used to try out a library or some other bit of code with an unknown security posture. As Next ’19 approaches, Google confronts strategic challenges in the cloud Google has become one of the top-tier cloud vendors, with a key role in driving cloud-native open-source initiatives to ubiquitous adoption among enterprises and solution providers everywhere. It also remains a pacesetter in the core innovations behind cloud-native computing — especially in the Kubernetes container orchestration layer, the Istio mesh fabric and the Knative serverless abstraction layer. TriggerMesh Releases Open Source Knative Event Sources for Multi-Cloud Environments TriggerMesh has released their latest open-source project, Knative Lambda Sources (KLASS). KLASS are event sources that can be used to trigger Knative functions in Kubernetes clusters. This enables AWS events to be consumed within a multi-cloud or on-premise environment. This release follows the release of Knative Lambda Runtimes which further enhance the TriggerMesh cloud platform. Knative Lambda Sources (KLASS, pronounced class) allow Knative event sources for AWS services. Written as Go event consumers and packaged as container sources which make use of CloudEvents. At the time of writing, KLASS supports events from Code Commit, Cognito, DDB, IOT, Kinesis, S3, SNS, and SQS. read more

Brand-New Videos Look at KDE Plasma 5.15 and KDE Neon Installation

2019-03-24 13:22:20

Trying Out KDE Plasma 5.15 KDE Neon Installation Walkthrough read more

Devices: Game Boy and OpenMV

2019-03-24 13:19:07

Game Boy Recreated in Verilog With the wide availability of Raspberry Pi hardware and pre-baked Linux distros with emulators ready to go, making a retro handheld is easier than ever. Emulation isn’t the only way to go about playing old games however. [Wenting Zhang] decided to instead recreate the Nintendo Game Boy in Verilog, and has documented the effort. The project runs on a Spartan 6 FPGA. [Wenting] first developed the hardware to use a DualShock controller for input, and output video to a regular LCD monitor. However, work is now underway to produce a handheld VerilogBoy. This will feature a 320×320 LCD screen, with pixels being quadrupled from the original Game Boy 160×144 resolution, with some pixels to spare. [Wenting] is also looking at porting the code to some Pano Logic units, which we’ve discussed before. The thin clients pack FPGA hardware and lots of IO ports that make them perfect for such a project. OpenMV: Low-cost, open-source platform enables disparate embedded vision applications Making embedded machine vision applications more accessible is the ultimate goal of OpenMV, a project responsible for developing multiple iterations of open-source, low-cost embedded camera platforms. OpenMV began in 2013, when Ibrahim Abdelkader, Vice President and Co-Founder, sought a better, cheap serial camera module than what was available to him. The desired result was a small, expandable machine vision module that cost less than $100. Eventually, OpenMV moved to a Hackaday Project, then to a Kickstarter project, then—when Kwabena Agyeman, President and Co-Founder joined in 2015—an operating business. [...] “With the kernel, you can send a script of Python code, and it parses, compiles, and executes that code. All our functions are written in C, then they have a Python module created for them that you can call using the MicroPython interpreter. The reason having Python is helpful is that our firmware is about 2 MB now, and it takes a good minute or so to load the firmware,” he says. read more

Ubuntu 19.04 Updates - 7 Things To Know

2019-03-24 13:16:34

Ubuntu 19.04 is scheduled to arrive in another 30 days. I've been using it for the past week or so, and even as a pre-beta, the OS is pretty stable and not buggy at all. Here are a bunch of things you should know about the yet to be officially released Ubuntu 19.04. read more

Vulkan Working To Expose Video Encode/Decode, Machine Learning

2019-03-24 13:09:19

During this week's Game Developers Conference was the usual Khronos Dev Day where Vulkan, WebGL, glTF, and OpenXR took center stage. During the Vulkan State of the Union some details on their future endeavors were covered...

Security: Privacy, GitHub 'Leaks', Network Security, Android and More

2019-03-24 13:07:59

Ways to safeguard your privacy on the Net Over 100,000 GitHub repos have leaked API or cryptographic keys What Is Network Security? Types of Network Security - EC-Council Official Blog Over the past decade, the world has become more interconnected, with the advancement of new networking technologies. Similarly, our dependency on the Internet has reached an unimaginable level. A huge amount of personal, commercial, and confidential data is stored on either private or openly accessible networks. The significance of this intellectual data reflects the importance of network security in our lives. The probable threats to this data are sometimes not easy to detect or prevent. Conversely, the victims face a tough time in terms of time spent to recover the compromised data and money lost due to financial theft. An Android Vulnerability Went Unfixed for Over Five Years Meet the new generation of white hats The people who contribute and help maintain open source projects are pretty passionate about being proactive members of the community. They believe in helping to make the projects better and stronger for others to use. These discoveries have wide-reaching effects since open source projects easily find their way into large commercial products that depend on open source projects to help solve problems and add features that in-house developers would have to otherwise write themselves. Getting involved in finding vulnerabilities in open source projects can also be a great way for new researchers who are hoping to enter the security field can enhance their resume, which in turn will help them in the job hunt down the line. 5 essential router security settings you need to check now The bad news: most people don’t give a second thought to their routers. This lack of know-how puts a lot of households in a dangerous position. The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has issued an alert about Russian state-supported hackers carrying out attacks against a large number of home routers in the U.S. read more

KDE Picking Up Thumbnail Previews For Blender Files, Continued UI Improvements

2019-03-24 13:03:20

It's Sunday and that means KDE developer Nate Graham is out with his (great) weekly recap of the interesting improvements made over the past week in KDE land...

Xfce's Screensaver Is Now Faster & Smarter About Conserving Power/Resources

2019-03-24 12:48:56

There still is no sign of Xfce 4.14, but this week marked the release of a big update to Xfce's screensaver component...

WinTUN: Windows Finally Gets A Good TUN Driver & It's Open-Source

2019-03-24 12:31:25

With existing Windows APIs being a nuisance, under NDA'ed documentation, and other problems, WireGuard developers have taken to developing a "good" TUN driver for Windows. This lets user-space programs serve as virtual network adapters to read/write directly into the network stack...

How to Install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu Server 18.04

2019-03-24 12:25:38

In this first piece, I’ll be demonstrating the installation and configuration of OpenLDAP on Ubuntu Server 18.04. All you will need to make this work is a running instance of Ubuntu Server 18.04 and a user account with sudo privileges.

Linux Foundation: CommunityBridge, Continuous Delivery Foundation and Zowe

2019-03-24 12:15:26

CommunityBridge gives better visibility into open source code [Ed: CommunityBridge gives Microsoft more control] “The Linux Foundation has done a fantastic job at bringing a diverse ecosystem on to one platform designed to mutualize resources,” said Eiso Kant, co-founder, and CEO of source{d}. “We’re thrilled to collaborate with the Open Source community and surface insights everyone needs to better manage, develop or contribute to their respective project codebases.” As a recent example, source{d} analyzed the Kubernetes project reporting that as it nears 2 million lines of code (including all languages and generated files), the 4-year-old open source project is showing many signs of maturity. The velocity of commits for the core Kubernetes project seemed to be slowing down as the community focus moves to infrastructure testing, cluster federation, Machine Learning, and HPC (High-Performance Computing) workloads management. With just under 16,000 methods, the Kubernetes API also seems to be stabilizing despite its high level of complexity. The Continuous Delivery Foundation - what will it bring to DevOps? Inside the new Continuous Delivery Foundation Does the world need yet another open source foundation? That is a question that was posed to the founding members of the CDF - the Continuous Delivery Foundation - which recently formed as an addition to the roster of sub-groups beneath the Linux Foundation. Skeptics might be brought over by the fact that Jenkins, Jenkins X, Netflix and Google's Spinnaker and Google's Tekton projects have all found themselves at the heart of the initiative, which is aimed at "developing, nurturing, and promoting open source projects, best practices and industry specifications" related to continuous delivery - in other words, speedy software cycles that are at the heart of the devops motto to 'fail fast'. Open Source Project Fosters Data Teamwork Best Practices Mainframe DevOps Using Zowe Open Source This session will demonstrate how to use the Zowe open source framework to extend modern devops tooling and practices to the mainframe and to enhance the mainframe developer experience. A follow-up to the overview session, the hosts will drill into the Zowe architecture while demoing key capabilities including the command line interface (CLI) and API Mediation Layer. read more

FOSS in Healthcare: NYU, NHSX, Visikol, Clubfoot Brace, Optical Cardiography

2019-03-24 12:13:17

NYU open-sources breast cancer screening model trained on over 200,000 mammography exams Breast cancer is the second leading cancer-related cause of death among women in the U.S. It’s estimated that in 2015, 232,000 women were diagnosed with the disease and approximately 40,000 died from it. And while diagnostic exams like mammography have come into wide practice — in 2014, over 39 million breast cancer screenings were performed in the U.S. alone — they’re not always reliable. About 10 to 15 percent of women who undergo a mammogram are asked to return following an inconclusive analysis. That’s why researchers at New York University are investigating an AI-driven technique that promises much higher precision than today’s tests. In a newly published paper on Arxiv.org (“Deep Neural Networks Improve Radiologists’ Performance in Breast Cancer Screening“), they describe a deep convolutional neural network — a class of machine learning algorithm commonly used in image classification — that notches an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.895 in predicting the presence of a cancerous breast tumor. Moreover, they claim that when averaged with the probability of malignancy predicted by a radiologist from the AI system’s results, the AUC is higher than either method achieves separately. [...] The team began by sourcing a data set comprising 229,426 digital screening mammography exams (1,001,093 images) from 141,473 patients, each of which contained at least four images corresponding to the four views typically used in mammography screenings (right craniocaudal, left craniocaudal, right mediolateral oblique, and left mediolateral oblique). They extracted labels from 5,832 exams with at least one biopsy performed within 120 days of the screening mammogram, and then recruited a team of radiologists — all of whom were provided supporting pathology reports — to indicate where the biopsies were taken “at the pixel level.” Will this new openness to open source heed past lessons? NHSX has listed open source as one of its priorities. For Ewan Davis, there is a keen sense of déjà vu – and a desperate desire for the many lessons of the past to be heeded. Open source seems to be back on the NHS agenda, courtesy of NHSX. The body lists one of its responsibilities as: “Making sure that all source code is open by default so that anyone who wants to write code for the NHS can see what we need.” As a new organisation NHSX has no corporate memory and so I thought it might be helpful to share my observations on what happened last time the NHS got excited about open source. It started when Tim Kelsey (peace be upon him) – then NHS England national director for patients and information – went on a trip to the USA. He saw the open source EHR VistA operating in the US Veterans Administration, decided it would be good for the NHS, and wrote it into Tech Fund 1 like Brighton through a stick of rock. I got involved, working for NHS England with guys from World VistA and OSERA to establish what would be needed to localise VistA for the NHS. We came up with a plan but the cost was more than NHS England was willing to pay. NHS VistA was doomed. Our work did lead to the creation of an open source programme within NHS England, though, which rapidly absorbed and refactored Tim’s next idea: Code4Health. Visikol Releases Open Source 3Screen™ Python Library for Training Convolutional Neural Networks for Use in Digital Pathology Over the last two years, Visikol has leveraged its internal 3Screen™ image analysis software to provide its pharmaceutical Clients with unprecedented insights from their tissues. As a leader in the image analysis space, Visikol not only provides best-in-class services to its Clients, but also periodically makes useful 3Screen™ tools available to the academic community. To help the academic community with more easily adopting neural networks in image analysis, Visikol is launching a Python library to assist with training. Cost Sensitivity Analysis Performed for 3D Printed, Open Source Infant Clubfoot Brace Congential talipes equinovarus (CTEV), perhaps better known as clubfoot, is one of the most common congenital physical deformities, as it occurs at least once every 1,000 births. In countries like the US, CTEV is diagnosed at birth and treated while the patient is still a young child, using a method of weekly manipulation and casting, followed by an Achilles tenotomy. Then a foot abduction orthosis (FAO) is worn until the patient is about four years old so that the deformity will not reoccur. Unfortunately, these types of treatment options are not as readily available, or affordable, in developing countries like East Africa, where clubfoot can occur up to eight times every 1,000 births. Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography Open-source solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity An international research team from the George Washington University, U.S., and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Russia, has developed an open-source solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity. The technique involves monitoring multiple parameters at once -- for example, both electrical excitation and the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. This technique is a useful tool for enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms behind cardiac arrhythmias. The 3D models of the mapping system components and the source code for data analysis are openly available, enabling other research groups to benefit from the new solution. The study was published in Scientific Reports. Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography read more

Events: Percona, SUSECON and an Outline of Yesterday's LibrePlanet Conference

2019-03-24 11:30:27

Percona Reveals Full Conference Session Schedule for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019 SUSE and Partners to Showcase Open Source Business Technologies that Transform at SUSECON in Nashville SUSE® today announced sponsors, keynotes and breakout session details for its upcoming SUSECON 2019 global end-user conference, to be held April 1-5 in Nashville, Tennessee. With its theme "My kind of open," SUSECON showcases SUSE's dedication to collaboration and choice for partners, customers and community members. That openness shows in the latest software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that are flexible enough to be deployed anywhere and are fueling digital transformation and business growth. LibrePlanet Day 1: Trailblazing free software together On day one of LibrePlanet 2019, we welcomed 264 attendees to the Stata Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Techology (MIT). The LibrePlanet conference has now entered its second decade, and as software infiltrates more and more of daily life, there are many new and important ethical, social, legal, and technological questions to answer. Today's sessions examined the theme of "Trailblazing Free Software" from many different angles, addressing how we can apply the practical advantages of free software while maintaining and defending the indispensable principles behind it. LibrePlanet 2019 kicked off on Saturday, March 23rd with a moving, urgent keynote by Tarek Loubani, an emergency physician who splits his time between Canada and the Gaza Strip, focusing on the production and proliferation of free medical devices. Loubani's work involves gaining self-sufficiency and local independence for medical systems through the use of free techniques. Dr. Loubani described his journey from seeing change as the work of superheroes to a point of understanding change as built by millions of "tiny ants," working collaboratively to improve how we live. Beginning with stethoscopes, Dr. Loubani and other determined medical professionals and designers created free designs to 3D print cheap but high-quality medical devices, which can save lives in Gaza and other war-torn regions around the world. While many of the stories he told were tragic, Dr. Loubani's talk ended on a hopeful note, celebrating the dignity and ingenuity of the Palestinian people, and connecting it to the vibrancy and importance of the free software movement. read more

Jack Dorsey's Money for FOSS

2019-03-24 11:27:46

Jack Dorsey: Square Will Pay Bitcoin Devs To Build Open-Source Ecosystem In a move which underscored the tech mogul’s appreciation of both cryptocurrency and freely accessible innovation, Dorsey said he will hire “3-4 crypto engineers and 1 designer” to contribute to crypto full time – and pay them in BTC. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Launches Open-Source Bitcoin Dev Team On March 20th, Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter & Square, announced that $32 billion payments company Square is planning on hiring up to five individuals to develop “open source contributions to the Bitcoin and crypto ecosystem.” Up to four of the possible open positions are for engineers–particularly those who have prior experience in building blockchains. One of the positions is for a designer. Each of the positions is full-time, and the new hires will either work at Square’s San Francisco headquarters or remotely. And hey, they can even be paid in Bitcoin. Improving Bitcoin: Jack Dorsey Announces Open-Source Initiative Square Crypto Jack Dorsey—the CEO of Twitter and Square, announced “Square Crypto”—a team Dorsey is assembling to work full-time on improving the Bitcoin... read more

6 Best Free Linux Desktop Search Engines

2019-03-24 11:14:23

Desktop search is a software application which searches the contents of computer files, rather than searching the internet. The purpose of this software is to enable the user to locate information on their computer. Typically, this data includes emails, chat logs, documents, contact lists, graphics files, as well as multimedia files including video and audio. Searching a hard disk can be painfully slow, especially bearing in mind the large storage capacities of modern hard disks. To ensure considerably better performance, desktop search engines build and maintain an index database. Populating this database is a system intensive activity. Consequently, desktop search engines will carry out indexing when the computer is not being used. One of the key benefits of this type of software is that it allows the user to locate data stored on their hard disk almost instantaneously. They are designed to be fast. They are not integrated with a different application, such as a file manager. Such software performs in a similar way to Windows Search and Spotlight in Mac OS X. All of the applications featured in this article are released under a freely distributable license Also: Roadmap for Teleirc v1.4 read more

Security: Fizz, Ghidra, NPK and Nitrokey Fido U2F

2019-03-24 11:09:03

'Critical' Denial-of-Service Bug Patched in Facebook Fizz A critical denial-of-service (DoS) vulnerability was found in Facebook Fizz, the social media giant's open source implementation of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol, Semmle reports. Facebook patches denial-of-service flaw in its open-source Fizz TLS implementation Facebook last month patched a critical denial-of-service vulnerability in Fizz, its open-source implementation for Transport Layer Security protocol TLS 1.3, researchers have reported. Unauthenticated remote attackers could exploit the flaw to create an “infinite loop,” causing the web service to be unavailable for other users and thus disrupting service, according to a March 19 blog post from Semmle, whose researcher Kevin Backhouse uncovered the issue. And because Facebook made Fizz’s source code available for public use last August, other web services can potentially be attacked this way as well if they fail to apply secure updates. NSA Opts for Open-Source Sleuthing of Cyber Threats Cyber security is taking an open-source step forward with the National Security Agency's release of tools designed to reverse-engineer malware that holds people and companies hostage when their systems become infected. Unveiled at the recent RSA security conference in San Francisco, the NSA's Ghidra application for disassembling machine-instruction code covers a spectrum of operating systems and chip architectures for data centers and devices alike. By making the tool an open source kit, the Defense Department's top secret data intelligence agency is enlisting private developers to help it fight cyber crime. Coalfire Labs Develops Open Source Password Cracking Tool Coalfire, a trusted provider of cybersecurity advisory and assessment services, announced today that the Coalfire Labs Research and Development (R&D) team released NPK, an open source tool that provides unprecedented password cracking capabilities to break the security surrounding hashed passwords. The distributed hash-cracking platform is built entirely of serverless components in Amazon Web Services (AWS) including Cognito, DynamoDB, and S3. It leverages the exceptionally powerful GPU instances in AWS to bring staggering hash cracking performance to a price tier in reach of a weekend tinkerer. It was designed for easy deployment and flexible usage. Nitrokey Fido U2F Review & Rating The Nitrokey Fido U2F security key delivers two-factor authentication for the most popular sites on the web, and does so with impressive open-source bona fides. read more

Mozilla Releases Firefox 66.0.1 to Patch Two Critical Security Vulnerabilities

2019-03-24 10:02:41

Mozilla released the first point release to its latest Firefox 66 web browser to address two critical security vulnerabilities exposed during the Pwn2Own hacking contest event.

Cloudera's Commitment to FOSS

2019-03-24 08:44:43

DataWorks Summit 2019: Cloudera allays post-merger fears with ‘100% open-source’ commitment The 'new' Cloudera has committed to becoming a fully open-source company, having followed an open-core model prior to its $5.2 billion merger with former rival Hortonworks. All 32 of the current open source projects found between both Hortonworks and Cloudera's legacy platforms will remain available as cloud-based services on its new jointly-developed Cloudera Data Platform (CDP). Q&A: Cloudera’s Fight Back Begins in 3, 2, 1… [Q&A: Cloudera CMO Mick Hollison on Cloud Rivals, Open Source Licencing and More...] Post-merger your companies are providing over 30 open source-based products and keeping both Hortonworks and Cloudera iterations of tools. Are you focussed enough? It’s certainly a very valid question. I think it’s more focused than it’s ever been. This whole galvanising concept of an enterprise data cloud is really pulling it all together. Once all of the open source components are delivered as cloud-based services, you quit worrying so much about which open source project you picked; you let the customers make those decisions. And honestly even for them it’s delivered as a service. They just know that it’s a service that provides them with a data warehousing capability a service that provides them with a data engineering or data pipeline capability. read more

Chrome OS to bring Android VPN support for Linux apps on Chromebooks

2019-03-24 07:11:21

Back in February, I noted that the Chromium team was working to add VPN support in Linux containers running on Chromebooks. Now there appears to be a second VPN option in the works: As spotted by 9to5 Google, there’s an effort to extend any Android-based VPN apps to Linux. Also: Guide to reasonable privacy on Android read more

Programming: Python Stigma, Wing Python IDE 7.0 RC1 and the Nonsensical New (Sponsored) 'Study' From RedMonk

2019-03-24 07:07:13

Deconstructing xkcd.com/1987/ To me, the point of this xkcd comic is for Randall to be self-deprecating and point out how he let the Python situation on his computer get out of hand. Unfortunately people don't always pick up on this and instead decide to point at this picture and say, "see, Python is messed up!" But if you take the time to really look at the comic you will notice that pretty much none if it is directly Python's own fault (not knowing what pip is pointing at is pretty much the only thing you could point at and say is still the Python community's fault). Wing Python IDE 7.0 Release Candidate 1 The first release candidate of Wing Python IDE version 7 is now available through our Early Access Program. This release improves the array and data frame viewer, solves several issues in Python code intelligence, fixes VI mode jj and jk, fixes whole file PEP8 reformatting, and makes about 12 other improvements. Microsoft's TypeScript programming language rising fast, almost makes top 10 [Ed: According to a Microsoft site ("RedMonk uses code repositories hosted on GitHub"), Microsoft is on the rise. Lousy research. Delete GitHub as it helps Microsoft craft propaganda. This kind of thing has been done for years. Anti-GPL FUD, claims that Microsoft is top contributor to FOSS and so on. As if GitHub is the same thing as FOSS. GitHub itself is proprietary. RedMonk itself lists Microsoft as a client. The author of this article habitually bashes Linux (for years) and the site is Microsoft-sponsored (through ads). Fernando Cassia said: "If shell and powershell are "programming languages" I'm an astronaut. It's hard to take any analysis based on raw github categories too seriously. I'm not sure JVM languages with a non-JVM counterpart are counted for instance. Is jruby counted in the same category as Ruby?"] RedMonk uses code repositories hosted on GitHub and discussions on Stack Overflow to rank programming languages. read more

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 63

2019-03-24 07:04:12

It’s time for week 63 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative. These things are getting so huge I’m going to have to start splitting them up into multiple posts, because KDE contributors just don’t stop fixing and improving things! Expect more to come soon, but for now, here’s what we’ve got for you... read more

How to Install Mezzanine CMS on Ubuntu 18.04

2019-03-24 05:16:46

No description

OpenChrome DRM Driver Still Inching Along, Now Connected To New TTM Code

2019-03-24 04:59:36

The OpenChrome driver is still inching towards the mainline kernel more than one decade after VIA x86 graphics were last somewhat common. The newest achievement for the OpenChrome DRM driver is the merging of the new TTM memory allocator code...

10 Best lightweight browsers for Linux or Ubuntu

2019-03-24 02:28:30

Web Browsers, the day when they started making our lives easier by allowing us to crawl the internet to today’s world; they have been gone through numerous technological advancements. Browsers are quite advance to handle high-end graphics, online videos, apps and more without the help of third-party software. But this also has made them heavy in terms of consuming hardware resources, means more RAM and storage space. Such kind of browsers works well on good system configuration machines, however, Linux operating systems those are running on old PC or laptops or low configuration systems require light browsers with a minimal approach to work fast. Mainstream browser or shall I say the dominated one: Google Chrome that Linux users refrain themselves from instaling it on their machines is rather resourced consuming browser. This is the main reason why most of the Linux OS like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Centos and more come with Firefox Mozilla but somewhere it still not that much lightweight as we need it to be. So, I have done some research and gathered some lightweight Linux browsers. read more

Webauthn in Linux with a TPM via the HID gadget

2019-03-24 02:19:44

Account security on the modern web is a bit of a nightmare. Everyone understands the need for strong passwords which are different for each account, but managing them is problematic because the human mind just can’t remember hundreds of complete gibberish words so everyone uses a password manager (which, lets admit it, for a lot of people is to write it down). A solution to this problem has long been something called two factor authentication (2FA) which authenticates you by something you know (like a password) and something you posses (like a TPM or a USB token). The problem has always been that you ideally need a different 2FA for each website, so that a compromise of one website doesn’t lead to the compromise of all your accounts. Enter webauthn. This is designed as a 2FA protocol that uses public key cryptography instead of shared secrets and also uses a different public/private key pair for each website. Thus aspiring to be a passwordless secure scalable 2FA system for the web. However, the webauthn standard only specifies how the protocol works when the browser communicates with the remote website, there’s a different standard called FIDO or U2F that specifies how the browser communicates with the second factor (called an authenticator in FIDO speak) and how that second factor works. It turns out that the FIDO standards do specify a TPM as one possible backend, so what, you might ask does this have to do with the Linux Gadget subsystem? The answer, it turns out, is that although the standards do recommend a TPM as the second factor, they don’t specify how to connect to one. The only connection protocols in the Client To Authenticator Protocol (CTAP) specifications are USB, BLE and NFC. And, in fact, the only one that’s really widely implemented in browsers is USB, so if you want to connect your laptop’s TPM to a browser it’s going to have to go over USB meaning you need a Linux USB gadget. Conspiracy theorists will obviously notice that if the main current connector is USB and FIDO requires new USB tokens because it’s a new standard then webauthn is a boon to token manufacturers. read more

OpenStreetMap and Deborah Nicholson win 2019 FSF Awards

2019-03-24 02:15:38

This year the FSF awarded OpenStreetMap and the award was accepted by Kate Chapman, chairperson of the OpenStreetMap Foundation and co-founder of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT). OpenStreetMap is a collaborative project to create a free editable map of the world. Founded by Steve Coast in the UK in 2004, OpenStreetMap is built by a community of over one million community members and has found its application on thousands of Web sites, mobile apps, and hardware devices. OpenStreetMap is the only truly global service without restrictions on use or availability of map information. read more

Linux To Add Support For The MOTU 8Pre Digital Audio Workstation Hardware

2019-03-24 01:30:11

The MOTU 8Pre is a Firewire-connected device for digital audio workstations to be able to connect eight microphone inputs. The hardware itself is more than one decade old and in fact the manufacturer already discontinued the product, but with Linux 5.2 the kernel will be supporting this device...

Bash Concatenate Strings

2019-03-23 23:05:05

One of the most commonly used string operations is concatenation. String concatenation is just a fancy programming word for joining strings together by appending one string to the end of another string.

DSA-4416 wireshark

2019-03-23 23:00:00

security update

DSA-4415 passenger

2019-03-23 23:00:00

security update

RPi Zero W based robot kits offer pan-tilt cam, GPS, and ToF sensing

2019-03-23 22:26:53

The $120 to $165 “SparkFun Autonomous Kit for Sphero RVR” extends the $250 Sphero RVR robot with an Raspberry Pi Zero W, a pan-tilt camera, GPS, and an optional ToF distance sensor. SparkFun Electronics recently completed a successful Kickstarter project for its Sphero RVR, a four-wheeled tank-treaded robot that offers optional programming via a Raspberry Pi, Arduino, or BBC micro:bit. The robot is now publicly available for pre-order at $250 and SparkFun has announced two SparkFun Autonomous Kits for the Sphero RVR that add pan-tilt camera and location capabilities to the robot based on a Raspberry Pi Zero W. read more

James Bottomley: Webauthn in Linux with a TPM via the HID gadget

2019-03-23 21:58:47

Google Play Store Mistakenly Removed KDE Connect

2019-03-23 21:34:00

Google's Play Store made a bad mistake on Tuesday, long-time Slashdot reader sombragris writes: KDE Connect, a project designed to enable seamless communcation and control between a desktop computer and a mobile phone, was suddenly removed from Android's Google Play store. According to a Twitter thread by Albert Vaca, KDE Connect's maintainer, the removal was allegedly because the app was in breach of Google's new SMS policy. There's an exemption which applies to KDE Connect, but the maintainer was unable to contact anyone at Google to provide support. "There is simply no way to talk to a human being at @Google", he said. Cintora also announced on Twitter that while trying to comply with the Play Store's new policy, he'd initially been stopped again by technical problems. "The @GooglePlay console gives me an internal error, so I can't upload the version without SMS support." But on Thursday Cintora tweeted that KDE Connect "finally got approved, and SMS support is back in version 1.12.4, both on the Play Store and F-Droid!" Cintora credits this resolution partly to his Twitter thread, which got over half a million impressions. Its last tweet now features a picture of a celebrating parrot. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ubuntu 19.04 Updates: 7 Things To Know

2019-03-23 21:00:00

A new cleaner, crisper looking Ubuntu is coming your way.

Two gov notices point to vulnerabilities in devices for heart problems

2019-03-23 19:25:13

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued communications that cybersecurity vulnerabilities were found in some Medtronic devices. Hundreds of Medtronic heart devices are vulnerable to cybersecurity incidents, according to two US federal government notices.

Destination Linux EP113 - Technical Michael Interview

2019-03-23 19:16:21

On DL113 - Noah Checks out the Open Compute Data Centre, Gnome 3.32 Released, Sway 1.0 Released, TLP 1.2 is out, Firefox "send". Linux Gaming News plus our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

Linux Mint KDE Still Possible

2019-03-23 18:30:00

If you're the Linux Mint and KDE lover, then you know that starting from Linux Mint 19 "Tara", your beloved Linux distro has stopped shipping with KDE. So Linux Mint KDE has died a brutal death. But we can revive the combination of the two best software, i.e. Linux Mint on KDE.In this article, I will show you how you can install KDE on Linux Mint 19 or possibly any other distro gets released after Linux Mint 19 "Tara". I personally love the combination of two software. Linux Mint is the best Lin [...]

(OSS) Web Project Management Software and OSI

2019-03-23 17:23:20

10 Excellent Web Project Management Software Project management is the application of processes, methods, knowledge, skills and experience to achieve the project objectives. Project management tools encompass many different types of software such as scheduling, resource allocation, collaboration software, quality management, and cost control / budget management. This type of software is typically used by project managers looking to plan and control resources, costs and schedules to meet the objectives of a project. It can be very satisfying planning and delivering projects on time. One of the methods that has always helped me is PRINCE2, a de facto process-based method for effective project management. But project management software is equally as important to the success of a project. There are a number of different types of project management tools. One of the industry standards is the Gantt Chart, which provides a graphical displays of all the tasks that a project is composed of. Each bar on the chart is a graphical representation of the length of time the task is planned to take. Other popular tools include PERT charts (a method for analyzing the tasks involved in completing a project), Product Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of components that make up a project deliverable), and Work Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of deliverables and tasks that need to be performed to complete a project). To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 10 excellent web based project management software. Hopefully, there will be something of interest for anyone who wishes to organise their projects. Here’s our rating chart. New Open Source Initiative Sponsors Emphasize Diverse/Broad Industry Adoption [Ed: In fact, so diverse that even companies that attack Open Source are in the Board and are sponsors, e.g. Microsoft] Today the Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the global non-profit formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, is pleased to announce the corporate sponsorship of Daily Fantasy Cafe and Lineups.com. The contributions from these diverse companies underscore the broad appeal and applicability of open source software across industries. Over 20 years of work, the OSI has constantly found adoption of, and contributions to, open source software growing, year over year, as companies realize the benefits and value of collaborative communities of practice. No longer limited to the data centers and development shops of tech-companies, open source software is now pervasive across diverse industries, all seeking to reduce costs, drive innovation, decrease time to market, increase quality, and avoid vendor lock-in. “The OSI is actively engaged with organizations across government, education, manufacturing, agriculture, entertainment—everywhere.  As new industries emerge, like fantasy sports, they’re choosing to be, ‘open source first,’” says Patrick Masson, General Manager of the Open Source Initiative. “Daily Fantasy Cafe and Lineups really show how broad the appeal is now, and most inspiring, how companies that benefit from open source choose to contribute back. Open source is a collaborative effort, projects need code, community, and cash.” read more

How to Delete a User and Avoiding Residual Security Implications of Doing So

2019-03-23 17:21:59

Deleting a user is simple right... Not so fast. There can be some residual security risks. In this short article we discuss how to delete a user, possible security implications and how to avoid them.

Security: Cryptocurrency Fears and New Browser Holes

2019-03-23 17:21:32

Businesses Increasingly See Crypto Mining Attacks in Cloud Infrastructures Cryptocurrency mining is reportedly one of the most observed objectives of hackers attacking businesses' cloud infrastructures... Firefox, Edge, Safari, And Tesla Hacked At Pwn2Own 2019 Tails 3.13.1 is out This release is an emergency release to fix a critical security vulnerability in Tor Browser. read more

Graphics: FreeSync, Primus-VK, NVIDIA

2019-03-23 17:19:39

More AMD FreeSync Patches Likely Coming To Linux 5.2 While the Linux 5.0 kernel brought initial support for the long-awaited open-source FreeSync implementation, the Linux 5.2 kernel coming out this summer will likely have additional improvements.  Open-source developer Mario Kleiner has been working on a set of patches this month for enabling proper vblank and page-flip time-stamping when in the FreeSync/VRR (Variable Rate Refresh) mode. This work makes the vblank timestamps as accurate as in the fixed refresh rate behavior.  Primus-VK: PRIME-Style GPU Offloading For Vulkan For those with a PRIME style notebook or just making use of dual/multiple graphics processors in your system, Primus-VK allows for using a secondary/dedicated GPU for rendering while driving the display from the alternative (often integrated graphics) GPU. Primus-VK is implemented as a Vulkan layer as a clean approach for dealing with multiple GPUs in a Vulkan world.  Primus-VK pursues Vulkan GPU offloading by implementing this logic as a Vulkan layer for handling the rendering on one GPU and then when it comes to display-time it copies the image over to the integrated/primary GPU. This layer can be installed per-user or system-wide and has been tested on the likes of Debian. ENABLE_OPTIMUS_LAYER=1 is the environment variable used for activating the behavior. Primus-VK has also been tested with Windows games under Wine. NVIDIA Releases Nsight Graphics 2019.2 With Vulkan Profiling Support Released for GDC/GTC week was Nsight Graphics 2019.2, the proprietary cross-platform, closed-source utility tool for debugging, profiling, and analyzing Direct3D, OpenGL, and other GPU-accelerated APIs.  With this week's Nsight Graphics 2019.2 release they finally have added Vulkan profiling support. This support allows inspecting GPU performance metrics under Vulkan workloads within the program's Range Profiler. Other new additions include improvements for running Steam games on Linux, a feedback button, and enhancements to the accelerated structure viewer and API inspector. read more

Python Programming

2019-03-23 17:13:35

Basic AI Concepts: A* Search Algorithm Artificial intelligence in its core strives to solve problems of enormous combinatorial complexity. Over the years, these problems were boiled down to search problems. A path search problem is a computational problem where you have to find a path from point A to point B. In our case, we'll be mapping search problems to appropriate graphs, where the nodes represent all the possible states we can end up in and the edges representing all the possible paths that we have at our disposal. Learn Python 3 Web-Bootcamp: Strings And Numbers In Python3 (Part 2) In the part one of this series, we showed you how to use variables in Python 3. In this tutorial, we are going to work with Strings and Numbers. Configuring Django Templates Django is among the most recommended full stack web development frameworks at the moment. Django follows Model-Template-View (MTV) architecture. This is something similar to the traditional MVC( Model-View_Controller) architecture, but in Django, views are more like controllers, and MVC’s views are actually the template of Django. Detect nudity with nudepy python module. Python Bytes: #122 Give Me Back My Monolith How I learned Python Programming How to transition into a Developer Relations career A Look at Python, Parameterized I’ve written A Look at Python, Parameterized on the Toptal blog — a look at how, in Python, you can replace 6+ design patterns with one concept. read more

How to Backup and Restore Firefox Profile On Linux

2019-03-23 17:00:00

Learn how to backup and restore a Mozilla Firefox profile on Linux

21+ Linux Camera Software: IP, Webcam, CCTV & Security Camera Software

2019-03-23 16:50:13

Linux is a strong open source platform where every type of necessary software tools are available for both the beginners and professionals. If you are in confusion about which camera software or IP camera software to use in your Linux system, then I can only say that there are lots of IP, security or surveillance camera software available for Linux system. For helping you to sort out, today I am going to provide a list of Linux camera software where various kinds of webcam software, IP camera software, security camera software, and video surveillance software are included with focusing on various important features. read more

How to Install and Configure MySQL in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

2019-03-23 15:27:37

In this article, we will show you how to install MySQL database server on Ubuntu 18.04 and how to configure it securely.

NVIDIA Releases Nsight Graphics 2019.2 With Vulkan Profiling Support

2019-03-23 14:18:58

Released for GDC/GTC week was Nsight Graphics 2019.2, the proprietary cross-platform, closed-source utility tool for debugging, profiling, and analyzing Direct3D, OpenGL, and other GPU-accelerated APIs...

Primus-VK: PRIME-Style GPU Offloading For Vulkan

2019-03-23 11:39:54

For those with a PRIME style notebook or just making use of dual/multiple graphics processors in your system, Primus-VK allows for using a secondary/dedicated GPU for rendering while driving the display from the alternative (often integrated graphics) GPU. Primus-VK is implemented as a Vulkan layer as a clean approach for dealing with multiple GPUs in a Vulkan world...

Xilinx Moving Ahead With Plans To Upstream Their Alveo PCIe Accelerator Driver

2019-03-23 11:17:03

A few weeks back I wrote about Xilinx looking at contributing their Alveo FPGA accelerator drivers to the mainline Linux kernel. They are continuing to work on that goal and pushed out their latest kernel driver patches this week for these Alveo PCIe accelerator cards...

Learn Python 3 Web-Bootcamp: Strings and Numbers in Python3 (Part 2)

2019-03-23 11:11:42

In the part one of this series, we showed you how to use variables in Python 3. In this tutorial, we are going to work with Strings and Numbers.Note: Before you start, make sure you run each given code to understand that how things work!StringsString is a data type in programming language, strings in Python are very simple at initial glance but we can use them in many ways.A string is a sequence of letters, numbers or symbols enclosed in single or double quotation marks. String are immutable data type that means we can't change it once defined. Strings does not require to be defined in advance. String defined using double quotation marks:greeting = "Hello There!"String defined using single quotes:hint = 'Using single quotes'Using apostrophe in a string. Well, there are two ways of doing it:saying = "If you can't help yourself then nobody will."The other way of using apostrophe with escape character, if you still want to use single quotes:saying = 'If you can\'t help yourself then nobody will.'Combining and concatenating strings using addition operator, in simple words you can join multiple strings:example_concatenation_string = "First part" + ' and ' + "last part"print("Lap" + 'top')print("Another: " + example_concatenation_string)Multiplying a string, you will find it useful later:example_multiply = "Hey There!"*5Know the length of the string using len function:print(len("Hey There!"))length_of_string = "This is a string."print(len(length_of_string))Strings can be written on multiple lines:quote = """A person who never made a mistake never tried  anything new."""print(quote)Find out if the sub-string is present in a string:quote = "A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new."print("mistake" in quote)print("learning" in "You are learning Python 3.")Special characters in strings:We can do formatting in strings using special characters, for instance we need line break, tabs or other formatting. These formatting can be done in a string using special character called escape.Line break in a string:quote = "Albert Einstien said:\nA person who never made a mistake never tried anything new."print(quote)Tab in a string:print("Languages:\n\tC++\n\tPython\n\tJava\n\tC")Printing a backslash character:print("Languages:\\C++\\Python\\Java\\C")Making string omit the recognition of escape character:print(r"Omitting these escape characters \t and \n.")String formattingConvert numerical values to string using str function:print(str(1))print(str(33.33))print(str(987+11j))Use numbers in a string:print("He is " + str(23) + " years old.")We will see string formatting in more detail in upcoming articles.NumbersNumbers are important data type and used in every program, for example: score in games, represent data, store information in web applications and so on. Numbers without decimal considered as integers in Python.Python also supports the order of operations, let us use multiple operations in one expression.Use of add (+), subtract (-), multiply (*) and divide (/) sign in the Python:print(10+2)print(12-2)print(6*2)print(24/2)Exponents use two multiplication operators in Python:print(2**2)print(3**9)Order of operation in a single expression:print(5-1 * 2)print((5-1) * 2)Floats, you can use floats without worrying about how they will behave:print(0.1 + 0.8)print(1.1 * 2.99)That's all folks for this lesson! Hopefully these things will help you.Visit on site http://www.noobslab.com

More AMD FreeSync Patches Likely Coming To Linux 5.2

2019-03-23 10:52:37

While the Linux 5.0 kernel brought initial support for the long-awaited open-source FreeSync implementation, the Linux 5.2 kernel coming out this summer will likely have additional improvements...

Security: Updates, VPN, BleachBit, TenFourFox and Steam

2019-03-23 10:46:40

Security updates for Friday Linux apps on Chrome OS will soon support Android-based VPN connections Google is finally fixing Chrome OS's inability to protect Linux apps with a VPN, like the ones downloadable from the Play Store. BleachBit 2.2 Designed for Linux and Windows systems, it wipes clean thousands of applications including Firefox, Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, and more. Beyond simply deleting files, BleachBit includes advanced features such as shredding files to prevent recovery, wiping free disk space to hide traces of files deleted by other applications, and vacuuming Firefox to make it faster. Better than free, BleachBit is open source. Stand by for urgent security update Pwn2Own came and went and Firefox fell with it. The __proto__ vulnerability seems exploitable in TenFourFox, though it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be fully weaponized, and I'm currently evaluating the other bug. Builds ("FPR13 SPR1") including fixes for either or both depending on my conclusions will be issued within the next couple days. Steam vulnerability exposed users to account hijacking and malware [Ed: proprietary software cannot hide its holes for very long (or until it's too late to hide)] read more

Graphics: Vulkan in OpenArena and GDC 2019 Week

2019-03-23 10:44:42

vkOpenArena: The ioquake3-Powered OpenArena Game Gets Ported To Vulkan OpenArena, one of the most well known open-source games built atop the ioquake3 engine of what started out as id Tech 3, has now seen an independent port to the Vulkan graphics API. The vkOpenArena game now marks the latest vintage game seeing a port to Vulkan. Independent developer Sui Jingfeng has been working on vkOpenArena as a port of the OpenArena engine over to using the Vulkan graphics API rather than Vulkan. AMDVLK Has A Small Weekly Code Push For GDC 2019 Week With many AMD driver developers being over in San Francisco for the Game Developers Conference, this week AMDVLK saw rather small changes for this open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver. read more

Servers: Kubernetes, Docker, and Software Defined Infrastructure

2019-03-23 10:04:50

Kubernetes End-to-end Testing for Everyone More and more components that used to be part of Kubernetes are now being developed outside of Kubernetes. For example, storage drivers used to be compiled into Kubernetes binaries, then were moved into stand-alone Flexvolume binaries on the host, and now are delivered as Container Storage Interface (CSI) drivers that get deployed in pods inside the Kubernetes cluster itself. This poses a challenge for developers who work on such components: how can end-to-end (E2E) testing on a Kubernetes cluster be done for such external components? The E2E framework that is used for testing Kubernetes itself has all the necessary functionality. However, trying to use it outside of Kubernetes was difficult and only possible by carefully selecting the right versions of a large number of dependencies. E2E testing has become a lot simpler in Kubernetes 1.13. Why Docker Containers Matter, 6 Years After the Project First Started Docker, the eponymous name of the container technology and the company behind it, celebrated its six-year anniversary on March 20. From its earliest days, even as just a 1-year-old effort back in 2014, there was no shortage of optimism and excitement about Docker. With the Docker model, applications are more portable and run inside of containers, which are isolated instances that provide a more agile approach for development and deployment. Docker also introduced the "dockerfile" packaging format, which defines how a container image should be built. The container model that Docker first introduced has evolved over the past six years and is now the cornerstone of the broader cloud-native space, which includes the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In this eWEEK Data Points article, we look at some of the key facts about Docker and the cloud-native revolution it has inspired. Planning for a Software Defined Infrastructure Seems you can’t pick up an IT magazine these days without hearing the term software defined infrastructure. It’s easy to get caught up in the hype. You might be thinking ‘people are talking about so it must be something that we need.” Some of you are wincing from the pain felt in trying to adopt the latest technologies without properly looking at what will work for your environment and business. In a software defined world, the computing infrastructure is virtualized. That is, it is delivered as a service. Management and control of the networking, storage and/or data center infrastructure is automated by intelligent software rather than by the hardware components of the infrastructure. read more

Events: SREcon19 Americas, Scale, FudCon and Snapcraft Summit Montreal

2019-03-23 10:02:15

SREcon19 Americas Talk Resources At SREcon19 Americas, I gave a talk called "Operating within Normal Parameters: Monitoring Kubernetes". Here's some links and resources related to my talk, for your reference. Participating at #Scale17x Everytime somebody asks me about Scale I can only think of the same: Scale is the most important community lead conference in North America and it only gets better by the years. This year it celebrated its seventeenth edition and it just struck me: with me being there this year, there have been more Scales I have attended than I have not. This is my nineth conference out of 17. The first time that I attended it was 2011, it was the edition followed by FudCon Tempe 2010 which happened to be my first Fedora conference and it was also the first time I got to meet some contributors that I had previously collaborated with, many of which I still consider my brothers. As for this time, I almost didn’t make it as my visa renewal was resolved on Friday’s noon, one day after the conference started. I recovered it that same day and book a flight in the night. I couldn’t find anything to LAX -as I regularly fly- so I had to fly to Tijuana and from there I borrowed a cart to Pasadena. Long story short: I arrived around 1:30 AM on Saturday. Snapcraft Summit Montreal Snapcraft is the universal app store for Linux that reaches millions of users and devices and serves millions of app installs a month. The Snapcraft Summit is a forward-thinking software workshop attended by major software vendors, community contributors and Snapcraft engineers working at every level of the stack. read more

Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 15 - 2's Complement and Negative numbers

2019-03-23 09:44:31

Up until now, in this ongoing C programming tutorial series, we have discussed quite a few concepts, but missed a basic one. It's about negative numbers. Yeah, though we briefly mentioned signed vs unsigned variables in one of our initial tutorials, we didn't actually discuss how negative numbers are stored in memory.

Fedora 31 Preparing To Start Removing Packages Depending Upon Python 2

2019-03-23 07:40:48

Python 2 support will formally reach end-of-life on 1 January 2020 and Fedora 31 is preparing for that by working to drop packages (or parts of packages) that depend upon Python 2...

How to transition into a Developer Relations career

2019-03-23 07:00:00

Let's say you've found an open source project you really love and you want to do more than just contribute. Or you love coding, but you don't want to spend the rest of your life interacting more with your computer than you do with people. How do you combine your love for open source software with your love for the community in a way that allows you to invest your time in both? read more

A preliminary review of /e/

2019-03-23 06:20:11

I’ve been running LineageOS on my phone for a while now (and cyanogenmod before that) and been reasonably happy overall. Still even LineageOS is pretty intertwined with the google ecosystem and worries me, especially given that google is first and foremost an ad company. I happened to run accross mention of /e/ somewhere and since LineageOS did a jump from being based on ASOP15 to ASOP16 which required a new install anyhow, I decided to check it out. As you may have gathered from the above, /e/ is a phone OS and platform, forked off from LineageOS14.1. It’s located at https://e.foundation based in france (a non profit) headed by Gaël Duval, who Linux folks may know from his Mandrake/Mandriva days. The foundation has a lot of noble goals, starting with “/e/’s first mission is to provide everyone knowledge and good practices around personal data and privacy.” They also have a slogan “Your data is your data!” I downloaded and installed a 0.5 version here. Since I already had my phone unlocked and TWRP recovery setup, I just backed up my existing LineageOS install (to my laptop), wiped the phone and installed /e/. The install was painless and since (of course) there’s no google connections wanted, I didn’t even have to download a gapps bundle. The install worked just fine and I was off and exploring: read more

vkOpenArena: The ioquake3-Powered OpenArena Game Gets Ported To Vulkan

2019-03-23 04:01:03

OpenArena, one of the most well known open-source games built atop the ioquake3 engine of what started out as id Tech 3, has now seen an independent port to the Vulkan graphics API...

Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox Leftovers

2019-03-23 03:39:56

Chrome 74 beta: reducing unwanted motion, private class fields, and feature policy API Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Android WebView, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 74 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 74 is beta as of March 22, 2019. Chrome 74 Beta Released With CSS Media Query To Prefer Reduced Motion/Animations Google engineers are ending out their work week by issuing the beta of Chrome 74.  The Chrome 74 Beta features the CSS "prefers-reduced-motion" media query for honoring accessibility settings for those that may want to reduce/eliminate animations or other motions. Also on the developer side is ECMAScript private class fields, a JavaScript API for feature policy, CSS transition events, WebRTC additions, and other changes. Mike Conley: Firefox Front-End Performance Update #15 Firefox 66 has been released, Firefox 67 is out on the beta channel, and Firefox 68 is cooking for the folks on the Nightly channel! These trains don’t stop! With that, let’s take a quick peek at what the Firefox Front-end Performance team has been doing these past few weeks… SUMO A/B Experiments This year the SUMO team is focused on learning what to improve on our site. As part of that, we spent January setting support.mozilla.org up for A/B testing and last week we ran our first test! Get the tablet experience you deserve with Firefox for iPad We know that iPads aren’t just bigger versions of iPhones. You use them differently, you need them for different things. So rather than just make a bigger version of our browser for iOS, we made Firefox for iPad look and feel like it was custom made for a tablet. Mostly because it was. read more

Programming: Sublime Text Editor, RcppArmadillo, Django, Python and C

2019-03-23 03:36:49

Sublime Text Editor For Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint Programmers/Developers always love rich-feature text editor, they can be more productive using such application. Sublime Text Editor has been around since 2008 and widely used by many programmers. It is written using C++ and Python programming language, the best thing about this editor is that it's cross-platform and available for Linux, Mac and Windows. Sublime-Text editor natively support numerous amount of programming and markup languages, more functionality can be added using plugins, the plugins are mostly built by its community and maintained user free-software licenses. RcppArmadillo 0.9.300.2.0 A new RcppArmadillo release based on a new Armadillo upstream release arrived on CRAN and Debian today. Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 583 other packages on CRAN. William Lachance: New ideas, old buildings Last week, Brendan Colloran announced Iodide, a new take on scientific collaboration and reporting that I’ve been really happy to contribute to over the past year-and-a-bit. I’ve been describing it to people I meet as kind of "glitch meets jupyter " but that doesn’t quite do it justice. I’d recommend reading Brendan’s blog post (and taking a look at our demonstration site) to get the full picture. One question that I’ve heard asked (including on Brendan’s post) is why we chose a rather conventional and old technology (Django) for the server backend. Certainly, Iodide has not been shy about building with relatively new or experimental technologies for other parts (e.g. Python on WebAssembly for the notebooks, React/Redux for the frontend). Why not complete the cycle by using a new-fangled JavaScript web server like, I don’t know, NestJS? And while we’re at it, what’s with iodide’s ridiculous REST API? Don’t you know GraphQL is the only legitimate way to expose your backend to the world in 2019? The great urban theorist of the twentieth century, Jane Jacobs has a quote I love: Setup your Raspberry Pi Model B as Google Colab (Feb '19) to work with Tensorflow, Keras and OpenCV Getting started with the updated VS Code Yeoman extension for Camel projects Plot the Aroon Up and the Aroon Down lines with Python Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 15 - 2's Complement and Negative numbers Using multiprocessing - a simple introduction. read more

From Trusty to Bionic - my Ultrabook story

2019-03-23 03:33:10

I am happy with how the upgrade went, given that I've actually bumped the system two major releases. Apart from small issues, there was nothing cardinal in the move. No data loss, no complications, no crashes. All my stuff remains intact, and so does Windows 8, living happily together and sharing the disk with Ubuntu. Mission accomplished. But we ain't done. I need to make the system as usable as possible. Which means Unity testing - and Plasma testing, of course, duh! Indeed, this remains a productivity box, and as such, it must fulfill some very stringent requirements. It must be stable, fast and elegant. It must work with me every step of the way, and it must allow me to transparently and seamlessly use various programs that I need. On this particular machine, that would be video editing with Kdenlive, that would be image processing with GIMP, the use of encryption and VPN tools, tons of writing on the superbly ergonomic Asus keyboard. But all that and more - coming soon. For now, thank you Trusty for five sweet, loyal years. May you ReST in ethernet peace. read more

Software: Avidemux, Cockpit and NVMe VFIO in Linux

2019-03-23 03:18:24

Avidemux 2.7.3 Released with Various Decoder Fixes (Ubuntu PPA) Avidemux video editor released a new bug-fix version just 11 days after the last, with decoder fixes and misc small improvements Cockpit Project: Cockpit 190 Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 190. NVMe VFIO Mediated Device Support Being Hacked On For Lower Latency Storage In VMs Maxim Levitsky of Red Hat sent out a "request for comments" patch series this week introducing NVMe VFIO media storage device support for the Linux kernel. Levitsky is pursuing faster virtualization of storage while striving for low latency and that led to the creation of a VFIO-based mediated device driver to pass an NVMe partition or namespace to a guest. This NVMe VFIO mediated device support would allow virtualized guests to run their unmodified/standard NVMe device drivers, including the Windows drivers, while still allowing the NVMe device to be shared between the host and guest. read more

Fedora: Parental Controls, FPgM, Ambassadors/Translation Sprint, Modularity Test Day and Delays

2019-03-23 03:12:50

Allan Day: Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest This week I participated in the Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest, which was held at Red Hat’s London office. Parental controls and metered data already exist in Endless and/or elementary OS in some shape or form. The goal of the hackfest was to plan how to upstream the features to GNOME. It’s great to see this kind of activity from downstreams so I was very happy to contribute in my capacity as an upstream UX designer. There have been a fair few blog posts about the event already, so I’m going to try and avoid repeating what’s already been written… FPgM report: 2019-12 Fedora 30 Beta is No-Go. Another Go/No-Go meeting will be held on Thursday. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. The Fedora 30 Beta Go/No-Go and Release Readiness meetings are next week. Not posting here means not there is nothing done I looking with fears to this strange ideas Mindshare has for the future of the Ambassadors. You can not write reports if you not have an event, so I telling here now how hard it is in this country to organize an event. Since October 2018 I search for a place which would host the next Translation Sprint. We have tons of co-working spaces or NGO’s which have space available. But is always the same I asked e.g. Open Institute, answer we can host you just on Saturday. And I had actually to write there several times and even make calls because I got no answer for the first contact. The same on The Desk, we can host you only on Saturday. This makes no sense in Cambodia, it is a regular working day, because they have 28 holidays. So most people have to work until 2pm. What sucked on this one, I was working on it since end of January. So first meeting was setup for 11th March, I went there but nobbody there to meet me. This is normal cambodian working style I dont tell I am busy and cant meet you and give you an alternative time. Well the promised mail with an alternative time never arrived, so I had to ask for it again. Second meeting was then this Monday, I spent an hour with them with the useless result of “just Saturday”. But there is light on the horizon OpenDevelopment might host us but here just on Sunday, which is for us better then just Saturday. So six months, hundreds of mails and several meetings and achieved nothing. How easy is it to setup a Fedora Womans Day in the Pune office, compared to this and then just travel around the world to visit other events and this is then called “active” Fedora 30 Modularity Test Day 2019-03-26 Fedora 30 Beta Won't Be Released Next Week Due To Their Arm Images Lacking A Browser read more

Games: Lutris, Flux Caves, Cities: Skylines

2019-03-23 03:05:03

Lutris 0.5.1 Brings Improved GOG Integration, Various Fixes Released at the start of February was the big Lutris 0.5 release with an enhanced GTK interface, GOG.com support, and much more for this open-source gaming platform. Lutris 0.5.1 is now available with some much needed fixes. In the puzzle game Flux Caves you will be pushing around blocks to play with large marbles If you like puzzle games and marbles today is your lucky day as I came across Flux Caves, which merges them into one game. It's early-on in development but it has a pretty great idea. It's like piecing together an oversized marble-run, with each level having various tubes and other special blocks missing that you need to slot into place. Cities: Skylines is another game having a free weekend on Steam right now As a reminder, it recently turned four years old and it's showing no signs of slowing down with multiple thousands on it every day. If you do decide to give it a go, I highly recommend the Clouds & Fog Toggler mod from the Steam Workshop to give you a really clear view. That's another thing that I love about Cities: Skylines, there's a huge amount of extra content available for it like maps, mods, scenarios and more. The mod selection is incredibly varied too from simple tools to automatically bulldoze abandoned or burned down buildings to adding in entirely new ways to play. read more

How to Use Nginx as a Reverse Proxy

2019-03-23 02:07:03

In addition to being a web server, Nginx can also be a reverse proxy server. Here we will show you how you can make use of Nginx as a reverse proxy.

Lutris 0.5.1 Brings Improved GOG Integration, Various Fixes

2019-03-22 23:53:22

Released at the start of February was the big Lutris 0.5 release with an enhanced GTK interface, GOG.com support, and much more for this open-source gaming platform. Lutris 0.5.1 is now available with some much needed fixes...

Sublime Text Editor for Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint

2019-03-22 23:14:54

Programmers/Developers always love rich-feature text editor, they can be more productive using such application. Sublime Text Editor has been around since 2008 and widely used by many programmers. It is written using C++ and Python programming language, the best thing about this editor is that it's cross-platform and available for Linux, Mac and Windows.Sublime-Text editor natively support numerous amount of programming and markup languages, more functionality can be added using plugins, the plugins are mostly built by its community and maintained user free-software licenses.Sublime-Text editor is a proprietary software but it can be installed and offers unlimited evaluation which means you can use it as long as you want it to be free. So basically the evaluation period never expires.Features:Cross platform (Linux, Windows, Mac OS)"Goto Anything," quick navigation to files, symbols, or lines"Command palette" uses adaptive matching for quick keyboard invocation of arbitrary commandsSimultaneous editing: simultaneously make the same interactive changes to multiple selected areasPython-based plugin APIProject-specific preferencesColumn selection and multi-select editingExtensive customizability via JSON settings files, including project-specific and platform-specific settingsCompatible with many language grammars from TextMateAuto-save, which attempts to prevent users from losing their workSpell check function corrects as you type.Macros and Repeat the last action.Customizable key bindings, a navigational tool which allows users to assign hotkeys to their choice of options in both the menus and the toolbar.Find as you type, begins to look for the text being entered as the user types without requiring a separate dialog box.A wide selection of editing commands, including indenting and unindenting, paragraph reformatting and line joining.Recent Changelog:Files and folders in the sidebar will now display badges to indicate Git statusIgnored files and folders are visually de-emphasizedThe current Git branch and number of modifications is displayed in the status barAll changes to a document are now represented by dedicated markers in the gutterDiff markers show added, modified and deleted linesImprove positioning and sizing of gutter icons in some situationsLinux: Improved input method (IM) support - fcitx, ibus, etcLinux: Fixed a crash when using GTK_IM_MODULE=ximLinux: Tweaked behavior of up/down when on the first and last lines of a file to better match platform conventionsImproved performance with large numbers of rules in a .sublime-themeLinux: Moved to GTK3Linux: Various high DPI fixesSupport for Unicode 11.0Improved rendering of combining charactersLinux: Color glyphs are now drawn properly on light backgroundsLinux: Improved behavior of --wait command line argument when Sublime Text isn't currently runningMore information can be found here.Install using repository:Available for Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint/other Debian and Ubuntu derivativesTo Install Sublime Text Editor in Ubuntu/Linux Mint open Terminal (Press Ctrl+Alt+T) and copy the following commands in the Terminal:Terminal Commands:wget -qO - https://download.sublimetext.com/sublimehq-pub.gpg | sudo apt-key add -To install stable version add this repositoryTerminal Commands:echo "deb https://download.sublimetext.com/ apt/stable/" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/sublime-text.listTo install development version add this repositoryTerminal Commands:echo "deb https://download.sublimetext.com/ apt/dev/" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/sublime-text.listNow to tistall Sublime Text Editor run these commandTerminal Commands:sudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install sublime-textInstall via Snap:Available for Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint/other Debian and Ubuntu derivativesTo Install Sublime Text Editor in Ubuntu/Linux Mint open Terminal (Press Ctrl+Alt+T) and copy the following commands in the Terminal:Terminal Commands:sudo apt install snapdsudo snap install sublime-text --classicHopefully you will find it useful!Visit on site http://www.noobslab.com

DSA-4414 libapache2-mod-auth-mellon

2019-03-22 23:00:00

security update

CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 18.5.0, RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 Released, Seven Devices from ThinkPenguin Receive the FSF's Respects Your Freedom Certification, GNU Parallel 20190322 Is Out and Faceb

2019-03-22 22:18:19

News briefs for March 22, 2019.

How to Monitor Disk IO in Linux

2019-03-22 22:00:00

iostat is used to get the input/output statistics for storage devices and partitions. i

Chrome 74 Beta Released With CSS Media Query To Prefer Reduced Motion/Animations

2019-03-22 21:55:03

Google engineers are ending out their work week by issuing the beta of Chrome 74...

New low-profile ankle exoskeleton fits under clothes for potential broad adoption

2019-03-22 21:25:59

A new lightweight, low-profile and inexpensive ankle exoskeleton could be widely used among elderly people, those with impaired lower-leg muscle strength and workers whose jobs require substantial walking or running.

Best Linux Distributions For Beginners

2019-03-22 20:38:20

Linux beginners are always confused about choosing the best Linux os to start with. As there are hundreds of Linux distributions so it might always be a confusing part. But I'll help you choose the right Linux distro to start your Linux exploration. In this article, I'll walk you through a list of 8 Best Linux OS for beginners. read more

R.I.P. Intel Compute Card and Samsung Artik

2019-03-22 20:26:37

Every single one of the thousands of new products we’ve covered since LinuxGizmos launched in 2013 will eventually hit End-of-Life or be pulled prematurely. Death is a fact of life, even for electronics. Typically, we don’t hear about the discontinuations. Products simply fade away. Sometimes, as in the case of Intel’s discontinuation of the Joule and Edison COMs — or its later removal from market of the Curie module and Arduino 101 SBC — the market exits show up in the news. Intel has now pulled the plug on another product peripheral to its processor business: the Intel Compute Card. Intel confirmed the news to Tom’s Hardware after NexDock revealed that the future of the Intel Compute Card was “uncertain” and that it was halting development of its Compute Card based NexPad. read more

Economical append-only offsite backups with restic and Wasabi on Debian 10

2019-03-22 20:23:57

This guide shows how to install and configure the free backup software restic on Debian Buster to store off-site backups at the cloud storage company Wasabi. The main advantage of this guide is that it provides obligatory append-only backups. This means that once a backup has been made, it is secure in the sense that it cannot be overwritten or erased from the system the backup was made from.

How to set up Fedora Silverblue as a gaming station

2019-03-22 20:21:54

This process starts with a clean Fedora 29 Silverblue installation with a user already created for you. First, go to https://flathub.org/home and enable the Flathub repository on your system. To do this, click the Quick setup button on the main page. read more

Operational Resilience in the Cloud | Maximizing Business Value with AWS

2019-03-22 20:01:19

Operational Resilience in the Cloud Operationally resilient organizations depend on the help of four cornerstones: Operations, Security, Software, and Infrastructure. The post Operational Resilience in the Cloud | Maximizing Business Value with AWS appeared first on Linux Academy Blog.

Bootstraping a minimal Arch Linux image

2019-03-22 20:00:00

Learn how to create a functional and simple Arch Linux (from an existing Arch Linux installation) virtual machine image

Arch Linux Setup Internet, X Installation, System Configuration

2019-03-22 19:34:28

In this guide, we boot into our Arch system that we installed in the previous guide. Here, we configure an Internet connection, a couple of troubleshooting tips, and install some software. This software will include a graphical user interface (GUI) provided by the X server. As with everything else, each step will be performed manually, via the terminal.​InternetFirst off, we need to establish that we have an Internet connection. We do this by using ping command.$ ping archlinux.orgIf this retu [...]

Fedora 30 Beta Won't Be Released Next Week Due To Their Arm Images Lacking A Browser

2019-03-22 19:17:58

The Fedora 30 Beta was anticipated for release next Tuesday after having been under a beta freeze since 5 March, but that's not going to happen and now they are hoping to ship in early April...

Inside Incident Response: 6 Key Tips to Keep in Mind

2019-03-22 18:30:00

Experts share the prime window for detecting intruders, when to contact law enforcement, and what they wish they did differently after a breach.

Development Release: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1 RC 1

2019-03-22 18:17:35

SUSE has announced the availability of the first release candidate for SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1. The new snapshot includes many bug fixes and several package updates. "SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 is entering the Release Candidate Phase since we are closer and closer to the....

These Are The Top Reasons Why You Should Use Fedora Linux?

2019-03-22 17:51:59

Fedora is one of the most famous Linux distros. It has a lot of Amazing features and is powered by Red Hat Linux. However, many people prefer alternatives which are quite easy to operate. Those like Ubuntu is known for its simplicity and easy to use interface. Additionally, Kali Linux is known for its unique pen testing feature. On the other hand, people consider Fedora to be a difficult option because of its complicated user interface. However, we believe that Fedora is one of the most useful Linux distros with an active community. Hence, we have listed the Features And Advantages of Using Fedora Linux. read more

R.I.P. mrdocs (1963–2019)

2019-03-22 17:48:31

The Scribus Team is deeply saddened to announce the loss of our friend and colleague Peter Linnell who in the end lost his long battle against cancer. It is no understatement to say that without Peter Scribus wouldn’t be what it is today. It was Peter who spotted the potential of Franz Schmid’s initially humble Python program and, as a pre-press consultant at the time, contacted Franz to make him aware of the necessities of PostScript and PDF support, among other things. Peter also wrote the first version of the Scribus online documentation, which resulted in his nickname “mrdocs” in IRC and elsewhere. Until recently, and despite his detoriating health, Peter continued to be involved in building and releasing new Scribus versions. read more

Draw On Your Screen with this Neat GNOME Shell Extension

2019-03-22 17:17:58

Draw on your Screen with the aptly named 'Draw on Your Screen' extension for GNOME Shell. It lets you write text and draw over the Ubuntu Linux desktop. This post, Draw On Your Screen with this Neat GNOME Shell Extension, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

How To Setup Linux Media Server Using Jellyfin

2019-03-22 17:00:00

Using jellyfin, we can instantly setup Linux media server in minutes

SmartArt and Contributors to LibreOffice

2019-03-22 16:45:41

SmartArt improvements in LibreOffice, part 4 I recently dived into the SmartArt support of LibreOffice, which is the component responsible for displaying complex diagrams from PPTX. I focus on the case when only the document model and the layout constraints are given, not a pre-rendered result. First, thanks to our partner SUSE for working with Collabora to make this possible. Things to know if you are a new contributor to LibreOffice code When I began contributing code to LibreOffice, I faced some issues because I didn't know several facts that the other active contributors knew. This blog post summarizes some of those facts, and I hope it will be useful for other new contributors! read more

How to Install Slack on Ubuntu 18.04

2019-03-22 16:40:56

Slack is one of the most popular collaboration platforms in the world that brings all your communication together. Conversations in Slack are organized in channels. You can create channels for your teams, projects, topics, or any other purpose to keep information and conversations organized. You can search through everything that’s been posted in channels or your messages. Slack also allows you to talk with your teammates over audio or video calls and share documents, images, videos, and other files.

Linux Foundation: CI/CD Gets Governance and Standardization, Microsoft-Connected CommunityBridge, and DataPractices.Org

2019-03-22 16:33:09

CI/CD Gets Governance and Standardization Kubernetes, microservices and the advent of cloud native deployments have created a Renaissance-era in computing. As developers write and deploy code as part of continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) production processes, an explosion of tools has emerged for CI/CD processes, often targeted for cloud native deployments. CommunityBridge by the Linux Foundation: Digging In As such, the Linux Foundation has produced an environment across their projects and events in which independent discussion and development can happen. Is it perfect, no, but nothing is. What I do know is that we wouldn’t be where we are today with open source if the Linux Foundation hadn’t helped facilitate a lot of this. As such, CommunityBridge seems like an entirely logical next step. The only way we can grow to serve the broader ecosystem is to not just help the big-ticket projects like Kubernetes, but also the long-tail of projects too. A clear, featureful platform will pay dividends here in the broader success of open source. Now, this isn’t going to be a walk in the park. For CommunityBridge to succeed, it needs to be informed and guided by the broader community. The Linux Foundation can’t possibly have all the answers, none of us do. They are have been open in expressing their receptiveness to feedback, and it is important that projects provide it. This will ensure that CommunityBridge shapes the most critical needs in the open source ecosystem. DataPractices.Org Becomes a Linux Foundation Project “By joining forces with the Linux Foundation, we are inviting the broader community to help datapractices.org evolve,” said Brett Hurt, co-founder and CEO of data.world. “This is the collective knowledge of a group of experts that can, and should, continue to be refined by those closest to the effective, modern, and ethical use of data.” read more

A Look At Our New Business Platform: Introducing Dashboard Analytics

2019-03-22 16:12:59

Understanding how your team is consuming training, your ROI for purchasing Linux Academy subscriptions, and knowing just what your company is doing with Linux Academy is always important. The post A Look At Our New Business Platform: Introducing Dashboard Analytics appeared first on Linux Academy Blog.

Why Docker Containers Matter, 6 Years After the Project First Started

2019-03-22 16:00:00

eWEEK DATA POINTS: The open-source Docker container project was announced to the world in March 2013 by Solomon Hykes and has grown to become a cornerstone of the modern software development ecosystem.

Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 Released and the GNOME Metered Data Survey

2019-03-22 15:56:30

Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 Released Featuring numerous performance improvements and an improved low-power resource footprint, Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 continues to improve screen locking on Xfce. Tether Often? Take the GNOME Metered Data Survey In some parts of the world (even here in Blighty) many internet packages come with a usage limit, traffic shaping or “data cap”. For many, myself included these restrictions are part and parcel of going online. I often tether my Ubuntu laptop to my (data-capped) mobile internet, mostly when if i’m working from a cafe with a dodgy or insecure network. Using a computer with a data limit certainly affects the way you use it, the websites you access (and how long they stay open), the apps you run (or have running in the background), and so on. Overage charges can be costly. Traffic slowdowns often inopportune. Nixed connections the absolute worst. read more

Two Found Guilty in Online Dating, BEC Scheme

2019-03-22 15:55:00

Cybercriminals involved in the operation created fake online dating profiles and tricked victims into sending money to phony bank accounts.

Gaming: DeviluitionX, Walmart, Stadia, Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, Baba Is You, Epic, We. The Revolution and More

2019-03-22 15:41:46

DeviluitionX: Enjoying The 23 Year Old Diablo Game Atop An Open-Source Engine The latest open-source game engine project working to re-implement a legendary commercial game is DeviluitionX. This new effort is an open-source re-implementation of Blizzard's Diablo game from 1996 while now working on Linux and other operating systems nicely. The DeviluitionX effort has already reached "a fully playable state on Linux / macOS / Windows, with only minor issues remaining." DeviluitionX does require the game assets from the official Diablo release, which is now available easily from GOG.com following the recent Diablo release on that DRM-free platform. Walmart Is Planning Its Own Gaming Streaming Service: Report Google recently entered the $140 billion gaming industry by launching Stadia, a cloud-gaming service. The company garnered a lot of attention from tech enthusiasts as it showcased the service that supports 4K resolutions and gaming at 60fps. Exclusive: Walmart is Talking to Developers and Publishers About a Potential Streaming Service Google made headlines this week when it announced its arrival into the video game space with a new streaming venture called Stadia. But according to sources, another major corporation is investigating the video game streaming business too, and it's none other than Walmart. Multiple sources familiar with Walmart's plans, who wish to remain anonymous, confirmed to USG that the retail giant is exploring its own platform to enter in the now-competitive video game streaming race. No other details were revealed other than it will be a streaming service for video games, and that Walmart has been speaking with developers and publishers since earlier this year and throughout this year's Game Developers Conference. Google Has Killed 147 Projects, Will Stadia Join Them? In Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, music is your weapon and it's coming to Linux One Kickstarter I completely missed is Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, a musical themed quirky RPG where music is your weapon. The campaign is over and it managed to smash the funding goal, with Linux noted as a release platform. Based on the Deathbulge comic from Dan Martin (who is involved too of course in this), over two thousand backers pledged their support to give the developers just under sixty thousand dollars to bring the game to life. It smashed some stretch goals, including bringing in guest artists and having more character classes. Baba Is You is an excellent rule-breaking puzzle game, some thoughts Baba Is You, a recent puzzle game release from Hempuli Oy offers a pretty different take on the genre and I have some thoughts. Note: My key was provided by the developer directly. Also, likely spoilers contained within. Baba is honestly like no other puzzle game I can think of, one where you are literally changing the rules of the game to progress through each level and it's a magical experience. Truthfully, I thought it would be quite a simple game considering the mechanics but I've been massively surprised overall. Epic Games new 'Epic Online Services' will support Linux and it's free for developers to use Building upon the work they've done with Fortnite, it's going to offer support for: Parties, an in-game Overlay, Matchmaking, Player reports, Achievements, leaderboards, stats and so on. Don't get too excited though, as right now it's only offering Game analytics (telemetry about players) and a support ticket system with everything else "Coming soon". We. The Revolution sounds pretty awesome and it's out now Set in the blood-soaked and paranoid world of the French Revolution, We. The Revolution from Polyslash is officially out with Linux support. As much as I wanted to have some thoughts on it, given how incredibly interesting it sounds, I can't. GOG's Linux team sent over a copy but I'm not quite sure what's going on with the GOG release at this point. It advertises Linux support yet it has no Linux download even though supposed to have one, so there's some kind of delay on GOG's side with it. Update: Now actually live on GOG too. 2D indie platformer fighter 'Super Powered Battle Friends' looks interesting in the new trailer One thing we don't have enough of on Linux, is good platform fighting games and Super Powered Battle Friends is looking pretty good. Last time I wrote about it, there wasn't an official trailer to properly show it off. CodeWeavers have released CrossOver 18.5 pulling in Wine 4.0 and FAudio For those who want to help with Wine development without contributing code, CodeWeavers host the Wine project and contribute to its development along with their own CrossOver product. read more

Programming: Qt, Python, Rust, C++, C and Git

2019-03-22 15:32:49

Effective HMI interaction and safety attention monitoring using eye tracking technology: DeepGlance Quick Interacting effectively with increasingly widespread and advanced systems is one of the most important challenges of our time. Most modern HMIs are based on mouse, keyboard or touch screen and allow controlling even very complex devices in a simple and intuitive way. However, in certain contexts, the user may be unable to have direct contact with a device, in this case, we are talking about hands-free interactions and often voice commands are used to interact. But controlling a system by voice, however natural, is not effective for all types of operations and in all environments. In fact, every technology has its peculiarities, that’s why the HMI design and the UX are the subject of continuous research and aim to offer increasingly effective and natural interaction methods, also thanks to the combined use of more complementary technologies between them. Seven ways to improve your team’s Python If you’re a manager, then you’re always trying to find ways that’ll help your team do more in less time. That’s why you use Python — because it makes your developers more productive. They can spend more time creating new features, and less time debugging or maintaining existing code. It’s no surprise that so many companies are moving to Python. After you’ve moved to Python, you can still make your team more effective. That is, your organization can become more productive, combining technology and culture to help your developers improve. In such a scenario, everyone wins: Your company becomes more efficient and effective, and your team members are more satisfied. Rust All Hands 2019: Array iterators, Rayon, and more A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending the second annual Rust All Hands meeting, hosted by Mozilla at their Berlin office. The attendees were a mix of volunteers and corporate employees covering the full range of Rust development, including the compiler, language, libraries, docs, tools, operations, and community. Although I’m sure there will be an official summary of the meeting (like last year’s), in this article, I’ll cover a few things I was directly involved in. First, I’ll look at a feature many developers have wanted for a long time… GCC 9 libstdc++ Lands The C++17 Parallel Algorithms Implementation From Intel While the release of GCC 9 (v9.1) is just a few weeks ago, a late addition to this annual compiler collection update is its C++ standard library now having a C++17 parallel algorithms implementation thanks to Intel developers. Intel has been working on contributing their C++17 parallel algorithms library code to both GCC and also to the LLVM project. Intel has been working on this Parallel STL implementation the past few years with a focus on contributing the support to the libc++ and libstdc++ C++ standard libraries. The Parallel STL is a portable implementation of threaded/vectorized execution of standard C++ algorithms, which can equate to a performance win on today's multi-core systems. Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 14 - Bitwise operators practical examples Tutorial: Introduction to Git and Github read more

Sway - A Tiling Wayland i3-Compatible Compositor

2019-03-22 15:00:00

Sway is a free and open source tiling Wayland compositor that is compatible with the i3 window manager

In the puzzle game Flux Caves you will be pushing around blocks to play with large marbles

2019-03-22 14:52:48

Tags: Puzzle, Indie Game, Unity, Alpha, Early Access, DemoIf you like puzzle games and marbles today is your lucky day as I came across Flux Caves, which merges them into one game. It's early-on in development but it has a pretty great idea. It's like piecing together an oversized marble-run, with each level having various tubes and other special blocks missing that you need to slot into place. You can see some gameplay from an early version in the below trailer: Watch video on YouTube.com There's a demo available on the itch.io store page, with the full version only currently costing $2. I've no doubt the price will rise as it becomes more polished and it's a pretty good deal right now. While I love the idea, I do hope there's a lot more to it in the later levels as it was far too easy, everything was obvious since it's just sliding a couple of blocks to complete the pipe system that's there already. Once it's a bit more polished, I will likely pick up a copy and see what all the levels are like outside of the short demo. Roll on over to itch.io to check it out. If you do try it out, do note the startup time on Linux is a little long.

Security Lessons from My Game Closet

2019-03-22 14:30:00

In an era of popular video games like Fortnite and Minecraft, there is a lot to be learned about risk, luck, and strategy from some old-fashioned board games.

A Quick Look At The Firefox 66.0 vs. Chrome 73.0 Performance Benchmarks

2019-03-22 14:25:04

Given the recent releases of Chrome 73 and Firefox 66, here are some fresh tests of these latest browsers on Linux under a variety of popular browser benchmarks...

How to create a Ubuntu repository server

2019-03-22 14:12:15

This guide will show how to configure a local repository server based on Ubuntu Bionic, but it can be adapted to a previous version of Ubuntu or even to any distribution using Aptitude as the main package management system, like Debian or Mint. You might typically want to setup a local repository to save Internet bandwidth.

40 Linux Server Hardening Security Tips

2019-03-22 14:00:00

A quick checklist of security points to check before exposing a Linux server on the Internet.

Cities: Skylines is another game having a free weekend on Steam right now

2019-03-22 13:59:49

Tags: Steam, Game Sale, City BuilderIf XCOM 2 having a free weekend isn't your thing or the Tacoma giveaway on Humble Store then perhaps Cities: Skylines will be for you. From now until March 25th, you can download it completely free and play as much of it as you want. As a reminder, it recently turned four years old and it's showing no signs of slowing down with multiple thousands on it every day. If you do decide to give it a go, I highly recommend the Clouds & Fog Toggler mod from the Steam Workshop to give you a really clear view. That's another thing that I love about Cities: Skylines, there's a huge amount of extra content available for it like maps, mods, scenarios and more. The mod selection is incredibly varied too from simple tools to automatically bulldoze abandoned or burned down buildings to adding in entirely new ways to play. Cities: Skylines is easily the most time I've ever spent in a city builder and I've played a lot of them over the years. It's not just the best on Linux, it's the best normal city builder around right now. My one wish is that they continue to work on performance, as a huge city can really bring it down which affects all platforms. Find it on Steam, as with XCOM 2's free weekend, Cities: Skylines is also on sale with 75% off as are various DLC so you could look to complete your collection if you already own it.

AMDVLK Has A Small Weekly Code Push For GDC 2019 Week

2019-03-22 13:41:32

With many AMD driver developers being over in San Francisco for the Game Developers Conference, this week AMDVLK saw rather small changes for this open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver...

IPad mini review: In an age of larger iPhones, does Apple's small tablet still make sense?

2019-03-22 13:36:13

Apple hasn't abandoned the iPad mini after all.

CodeWeavers have released CrossOver 18.5 pulling in Wine 4.0 and FAudio

2019-03-22 13:36:12

Tags: Wine, AppsFor those who want to help with Wine development without contributing code, CodeWeavers host the Wine project and contribute to its development along with their own CrossOver product. For those who've never heard of it: CrossOver provides two main services on top of Wine.  1) CrossOver contains a series of hacks that allow some popular programs to run better in the short-term.  2) CrossOver provides a user-friendly shell so that you don’t need to use a terminal and text-based commands to run your Windows software on Mac or Linux.  Released yesterday, CrossOver 18.5 is a pretty huge upgrade as it pulls in the Wine 4.0 release (previously it used Wine 3.14) and also FAudio, the XAudio reimplementation for open platforms developed by Ethan Lee who now works with CodeWeavers. The actual changelog can be found here and the release announcement here. I can't say I know anyone who uses CrossOver for games, but for software it might come in handy, like with this release adding some support for OneNote 2016 and support for the latest latest release of Office 365. Good to have options though of course and since they support Wine directly it's a good way to help. They also put up a blog post (where the above quote is from) to help with those confused on the relationship between Wine, CrossOver and Proton.

WayPtNav: A new approach for robot navigation in novel environments

2019-03-22 13:30:04

Researchers at UC Berkeley and Facebook AI Research have recently developed a new approach for robot navigation in unknown environments. Their approach, presented in a paper pre-published on arXiv, combines model-based control techniques with learning-based perception.

First reputation-based blockchain guarantees security against 51 percent attacks

2019-03-22 13:19:19

Researchers at the University of Luxembourg are part of an international team that has proposed the first blockchain system to guarantee proper performance even when more than 51 percent of the system's computing power is controlled by an attacker.

Firefox 66 Is Now Available for Ubuntu 18.10, 18.04 LTS, and 16.04 LTS Users

2019-03-22 13:04:00

The recently released Mozilla Firefox 66 web browser is now available in the stable software repositories of the Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system series. Released earlier this week, the Mozilla Firefox 66 web browser has landed in Ubuntu's repositories with a bunch of great improvements, such as the hidden system title bar that respects the GNOME guidelines. Not only Firefox will now look good, but you won't have two title bars, nor you'll have to use extensions to get rid of one. Apart from the looks for GNOME users, which is now the default desktop environment on Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), Mozilla Firefox 66 comes with various under the hood improvements, such as freezeless downloading of files and faster web content loading by reducing the crash rates and increasing t...

Researchers suggest medical AI systems could be vulnerable to adversarial attacks

2019-03-22 13:02:04

A small team of medical researchers from Harvard University and MIT has published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science suggesting that future medical AI systems could be vulnerable to adversarial attacks. They point out that prior research has shown that virtually all AI systems are vulnerable in some way to such attacks.

How to Setup Two Factor Authentication for SSH on Fedora

2019-03-22 13:00:00

Every day there seem to be lots of security breaches reported where our data is at danger.

Nulloy – Music Player with Waveform Progress Bar

2019-03-22 12:57:55

Nulloy is a cross-platform Qt 4 based music player released under an open source license. A music player you may not have heard of, but one worth checking out!

CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 18.5.0, RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 Released, Seven Devices from ThinkPenguin Receive the FSF's Respects Your Freedom Certification, GNU Parallel 20190322 Is Out and Facebook Stored Millions of Passwords in Plain Text

2019-03-22 12:43:16

News briefs for March 22, 2019. CodeWeavers announces CrossOver 18.5.0 for Linux and macOS, updating Wine to version 4.0. In addition, CrossOver 18.5 includes "the FAudio library to provide superior audio support for games", "resolves several Office 2010 bugs related to activation and licensing", "supports the very latest release of Office 365" and "includes preliminary support for OneNote 2016 on Linux". Linux users can download it from here. RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 was released yesterday. extonlinux writes, "In RaspEX Kodi I've added the LXDE Desktop with many useful applications such as VLC Media Player and NetworkManager. Makes it easy to configure your wireless network. I've also upgraded Kodi to version 18.1 Leia, which makes it possible to include useful addons such as Netflix, Plex and Amazon Video. Which I've done." You can download RaspEX Kodi for free from SourceForge. The FSF awarded seven devices from ThinkPenguin with its Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification. The devices include "The Penguin Wireless G USB Adapter (TPE-G54USB2), the Penguin USB Desktop Microphone for GNU/Linux (TPE-USBMIC), the Penguin Wireless N Dual-Band PCIe Card (TPE-N300PCIED2), the PCIe Gigabit Ethernet Card Dual Port (TPE-1000MPCIE), the PCI Gigabit Ethernet Card (TPE-1000MPCI), the Penguin 10/100 USB Ethernet Network Adapter v1 (TPE-100NET1), and the Penguin 10/100 USB Ethernet Network Adapter v2 (TPE-100NET2)". This certification means that "products meet the FSF's standards in regard to users' freedom, control over the product, and privacy." GNU Parallel 20190322 ("FridayforFuture") has been released. You can download it from here. New in this release: "SIGTERM is changed to SIGHUP", "SIGTERM SIGTERM is changed to SIGTERM", it now includes a cheat sheet (parallel_cheat.pdf) and more, plus bug fixes and man page updates. And if you haven't already heard, Facebook stored hundreds of millions of user passwords in plain text for years. KrebsonSecurity reports that "Hundreds of millions of Facebook users had their account passwords stored in plain text and searchable by thousands of Facebook employees—in some cases going back to 2012. Facebook says an ongoing investigation has so far found no indication that employees have abused access to this data." Facebook has posted a statement about this here. News Codeweavers CrossOver Linux Raspberry Pi Kodi RaspEX FSF ThinkPenguin GNU Parallel Facebook Privacy

In Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, music is your weapon and it's coming to Linux

2019-03-22 12:20:55

Tags: RPG, Crowdfunding, Coming Soon, Indie Game, UnityOne Kickstarter I completely missed is Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, a musical themed quirky RPG where music is your weapon. The campaign is over and it managed to smash the funding goal, with Linux noted as a release platform. Based on the Deathbulge comic from Dan Martin (who is involved too of course in this), over two thousand backers pledged their support to give the developers just under sixty thousand dollars to bring the game to life. It smashed some stretch goals, including bringing in guest artists and having more character classes. Have a peek: Watch video on YouTube.com More about it: Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands is a role-playing game for PC, Mac and Linux (via Steam) similar to the likes of Final Fantasy, Grandia, LISA and Earthbound. The game also has an affinity with the sick and righteous, much like Sonic, Toejam & Earl and Tony Hawk's Pro Skater. You play the role of DEATHBULGE, a band that stumbles into a CURSED Battle of the Bands contest, where all entrants can attack and be attacked with music. After all, it just wouldn’t be a real BATTLE if no one got hurt, would it? Want to try and it see what you missed? Good news, they have a demo that's still up here. It's using the Unity game engine and it does seem to work quite nicely, although it's very early development stuff so keep that in mind. Even with it being super early stuff, what's shown is quite promising. I'm a big fan of the combat system, which is based on a time-bar and when it reaches the end you can attack. What makes it clever, is that you have abilities that add negative effects to your enemy's bar or positive effects to you own, like speeding up your bar or giving damage on theirs. Really liked what I saw from the demo, shall be following this one closely. See the now-finished Kickstarter here for the full info.

How to Repair MySQL Replication

2019-03-22 12:00:00

HowToForge: If you have set up MySQL replication, you probably know this problem: sometimes there are invalid MySQL queries which cause the replication to not work anymore.

Get 4 Essential CyberSecurity Software For Less Than $10 Per Month

2019-03-22 11:57:30

Major data breaches and cyber attacks are occurring at an alarming rate, and if you are still not using a VPN and password manager app, you are seriously out of excuses. Not just VPN software and a password manager, cybersecurity experts also recommend using antivirus and backup solutions to protect your computers and precious data stored on them. Unfortunately, to cover these bases, one

Medtronic's Implantable Defibrillators Vulnerable to Life-Threatening Hacks

2019-03-22 11:54:43

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Thursday issued an advisory warning people of severe vulnerabilities in over a dozen heart defibrillators that could allow attackers to fully hijack them remotely, potentially putting lives of millions of patients at risk. Cardioverter Defibrillator is a small surgically implanted device (in patients' chests) that gives a patient's heart an electric

Baba Is You is an excellent rule-breaking puzzle game, some thoughts

2019-03-22 11:40:28

Tags: Puzzle, Indie Game, Humble Store, Itch.io, Steam, ReviewBaba Is You, a recent puzzle game release from Hempuli Oy offers a pretty different take on the genre and I have some thoughts. Note: My key was provided by the developer directly. Also, likely spoilers contained within. Baba is honestly like no other puzzle game I can think of, one where you are literally changing the rules of the game to progress through each level and it's a magical experience. Truthfully, I thought it would be quite a simple game considering the mechanics but I've been massively surprised overall. Watch video on YouTube.com Baba is a game about thinking logically and throwing logic out the window at the same time. Logical because the blocks are all simple functions but it's completely illogical what you're doing. Some levels I really did spend an inordinate amount of time, just sat there thinking and trying various things. Baba is a game that loves you to experiment and fail, especially with the ability to just step back an action as many times as you like. There was one particular part early on I remember very clearly making me laugh out quite loud. I had to overcome some skulls which killed me on touch with no way to get over them, so thinking they wouldn't do it to a wall I moved the rule blocks around to turn myself into a wall. I obviously wasn't thinking it all through, as I honestly thought I would just turn into a single bit of a wall, but oh no—I became the entire section of walls in the level and so I just moved the whole wall onto the finishing flag and it was glorious. It left such a lasting impression that I was giggling as I typed that too! Another simple example: Lava is hot and so it will defeat you. Okay, let's rearrange some blocks, so instead of pushing rocks you push lava and simply move it out of your way. Want to know something else that's cool about it? The developer is giving away 10% of their personal income to charity, with Giving What We Can named in the game's splash screen. Baba Is You is available on Humble Store (DRM-free + Steam key), itch.io and Steam. I very rarely become this so deeply engrossed with a game, I just didn't want to put it down.

WireGuard Sent Out Again For Review, Might Make It Into Linux 5.2 Kernel

2019-03-22 11:30:01

WireGuard lead developer Jason Donenfeld has sent out the ninth version of the WireGuard secure network tunnel patches for review. If this review goes well and lands in net-next in the weeks ahead, this long-awaited VPN improvement could make it into the mainline Linux 5.2 kernel...

Wizard Kit: How I Protect Myself from Surveillance

2019-03-22 11:30:00

by Augustine Fou Ever since the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Panopticlick initiative in 2010, I’ve been sensitized to the risks and potential harms that come from adtech’s tracking of consumers. Indeed, in the years since, it has gotten far far worse. People are only now discovering the bad stuff that has been going on. For example, iPhone apps have been secretly recording users' keystrokes (see ZDNet, Feb 8, 2019), and Android apps with more than 2 billion downloads were committing ad fraud on real humans’ devices behind their backs (see BuzzFeed News, Nov 2018). For many more examples of spying on consumers, documented over the years, see Know Who’s Spying on You at All Times.   The popular apps that many humans use continue to track then even if they are logged out, and they also track users who never created an account in the first place (see Facebook tracks both non-users and logged out users). And Google tracks users’ locations even if they turned off location and denied permissions to apps (see Google Tracks Location Even When Users Turn Service Off). Even good apps that never intended to track users may actually be doing so because the SDKs (software development kits) with which they were built may be tracking users and sending data off to others’ servers without their knowledge. Remember the story about the low cost bathroom scale that didn’t work if location was turned off on the smartphone and there was no internet connection? It turns out that the scale was sending data to bare IP addresses that could be traced back to China.   Go to Full Article

AZORult++: Rewriting history

2019-03-22 11:13:43

In early March 2019, a number of malicious files detected by our products caught the eye. Although similar to AZORult stealer already known to us, unlike the original malware, they were written not in Delphi, but in C++.

Sensor can monitor wiring in a building or ship, and signal when repairs are needed

2019-03-22 11:04:20

A new system devised by researchers at MIT can monitor the behavior of all electric devices within a building, ship, or factory, determining which ones are in use at any given time and whether any are showing signs of an imminent failure. When tested on a Coast Guard cutter, the system pinpointed a motor with burnt-out wiring that could have led to a serious onboard fire.

Firefox 67 Will Add Support for Running Different Firefox Installs Side by Side

2019-03-22 10:29:14

With the Firefox 66 release out the door, Mozilla is now concentrating its efforts on the next major release of its open-source and cross-platform web browser used by millions of computer and mobile users worldwide, Firefox 67.

Epic Games new 'Epic Online Services' will support Linux and it's free for developers to use

2019-03-22 10:24:15

Tags: Misc, Game DevHere's something interesting, Epic Games are launching their Epic Online Services and it will support Linux as well as multiple different game engines. Building upon the work they've done with Fortnite, it's going to offer support for: Parties, an in-game Overlay, Matchmaking, Player reports, Achievements, leaderboards, stats and so on. Don't get too excited though, as right now it's only offering Game analytics (telemetry about players) and a support ticket system with everything else "Coming soon". On the official page that's now live, it shows the happy little Linux "tux" logo and in the FAQ at the bottom it clearly states it too: Epic Online Services will initially come with built-in support for Windows, Mac, and Linux. PlayStation, Xbox, Android, Switch, and iOS support will be added in the coming months. Regardless of your feelings towards Epic Games and their current exclusive deal strategy, it's still essential that services like this support Linux. Lots of developers use the Unreal Engine which they will no doubt push for developers to use this, also since it will support Unity and other games engines if even more developers use it then we don't want another barrier for Linux game development. As for the Epic Store itself, don't get excited about that either, it's still not even on their (now public) roadmap.

AI hardware news: Nvidia has dev kit for tinkerers while module to ship in June

2019-03-22 10:15:46

To say that Nvidia is interested about artificial intelligence is an understatement. It's like saying Nvidia finds technology interesting. The company's AI platform, it said, is a decade-long, multibillion-dollar investment that it made to advance the science of AI computing.

NVMe VFIO Mediated Device Support Being Hacked On For Lower Latency Storage In VMs

2019-03-22 10:08:35

Maxim Levitsky of Red Hat sent out a "request for comments" patch series this week introducing NVMe VFIO media storage device support for the Linux kernel...

We. The Revolution sounds pretty awesome and it's out now

2019-03-22 10:01:32

Tags: Humble Store, Steam, GOGSet in the blood-soaked and paranoid world of the French Revolution, We. The Revolution from Polyslash is officially out with Linux support. As much as I wanted to have some thoughts on it, given how incredibly interesting it sounds, I can't. GOG's Linux team sent over a copy but I'm not quite sure what's going on with the GOG release at this point. It advertises Linux support yet it has no Linux download even though supposed to have one, so there's some kind of delay on GOG's side with it. Rather than give you the launch trailer, here's the previous gameplay trailer which is far more useful: Watch video on YouTube.com More about it: The player judges criminals and counter-revolutionaries, but also innocent Parisians. The Judge has to peruse case files, study evidence, and interrogate the defendants in a way that ensures either justice… or the player’s profit. Each decision will have an impact on the factions in Paris, the player’s family, or the player themselves. The game will reward clever decision-making, allowing the player to – for example – outwit and defeat more powerful enemies. You can find it on Humble Store, GOG (eventually?) and Steam.

GNU Parallel 20190322 Released - Wants To Help Speed Up Single-Threaded Linux Commands

2019-03-22 09:55:58

GNU Parallel is a tool for carrying out multiple commands/jobs in parallel on one or more computers. Out today is the GNU Parallel 20190322 release with a few changes over last month's update...

2D indie platformer fighter 'Super Powered Battle Friends' looks interesting in the new trailer

2019-03-22 09:51:04

Tags: Indie Game, Itch.io, Steam, Vulkan, Unreal Engine, Coming Soon, Early AccessOne thing we don't have enough of on Linux, is good platform fighting games and Super Powered Battle Friends is looking pretty good. Last time I wrote about it, there wasn't an official trailer to properly show it off. The developer reached out to let everyone know they actually now have one so we can get a better idea of how it plays: Watch video on YouTube.com As a reminder, it's being made in Unreal Engine with Vulkan and from what the developer told me recently it's running very nicely on Linux. It's going to have local multiplayer as well as online play, even if there's no one around on either it will also feature AI bots so it has the best of all worlds. You can follow it along on itch.io and Steam, it will release as an Early Access title in May. I will take a good look when it's released!

Security: Updates, Windows, Medtronic and FUD

2019-03-22 09:47:08

Security updates for Thursday Norwegian firm attack likely through Microsoft Active Directory: claim The Windows network at the Norwegian aluminium maker Norsk Hydro was probably infiltrated by attackers who planted the LockerGoga ransomware using something like scheduled tasks or services in Microsoft's Active Directory, a British security expert says. Microsoft starts notifying Windows 7 users about end of support Microsoft’s end of support date means that Windows 7 users will no longer receive security updates, and the company wants consumers to upgrade to Windows 10 PCs instead. While the notification doesn’t mention Windows 10, Microsoft links to a new Windows 7 site that encourages consumers to upgrade their PCs. Critical flaw lets [attackers] control lifesaving devices implanted inside patients The federal government on Thursday warned of a serious flaw in Medtronic cardio defibrillators that allows attackers to use radio communications to surreptitiously take full control of the lifesaving devices after they are implanted in a patient. Defibrillators are small, surgically implanted devices that deliver electrical shocks to treat potentially fatal irregular heart rhythms. In recent decades, doctors have increasingly used radios to monitor and adjust the devices once they're implanted rather than using older, costlier, and more invasive means. An array of implanted cardio defibrillators made by Medtronic rely on two types of radio-based consoles for initial setup, periodic maintenance, and regular monitoring. Doctors use the company's CareLink Programmer in clinics, while patients use the MyCareLink Monitor in homes to regularly ensure the defibrillators are working properly. New vulnerability reporting platform aims to make open source safer [Ed: Ad disguised as an article for firm that works with Microsoft and never speaks about back doors in proprietary software] read more

CI/CD Gets Governance and Standardization

2019-03-22 09:22:33

Kubernetes, microservices and the advent of cloud native deployments have created a Renaissance-era in computing. As developers write and deploy code as part of continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) production processes, an explosion of tools has emerged for CI/CD processes, often targeted for cloud native deployments.

Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail

2019-03-22 09:14:54

Ibase’s 21.5-inch “UPC-7210” and “UPC-6210” panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection. Sometimes there’s a fine line between digital signage players and touch-panel PCs. Touch panels tend to be bulkier with lower resolution and fewer multi-display options [[he]#8230[/he]]