How To Set Timezone And Enable Network Time Sync (NTP) From The Command Line

2019-07-20 02:37:43

Installing Microsoft's fonts on Solus

2019-07-19 20:03:10

Pango 1.44 Is Coming Thanks To The Revival By GNOME Developers

2019-07-19 20:00:00

Back in May there were the plans shared by Red Hat's Matthias Clasen to work out some improvements to the Pango layout engine library after going fairly stale in recent years. That work is coming to fruition with a Pango 1.44 release looking like it will be here soon with new features...

How To Use Certbot Standalone Mode to Retrieve Let's Encrypt SSL Certificates on Debian 10

2019-07-19 19:53:37

Another app with privacy concerns: TikTok, a popular video app with ties to China

2019-07-19 19:30:01

The resurgence of St. Petersburg, Russia-based FaceApp has sparked renewed concerns about online privacy, and popular video app TikTok is also raising red flags among security experts.

Shoppers say Amazon Prime Day glitch sold $13,000 camera equipment for $94, over 99% off

2019-07-19 19:24:19

On Monday and Tuesday, Amazon's annual Prime Day reportedly gave some shoppers deeper discounts than they expected, thanks to a system error.

Zstd 1.4.1 Further Improves Decode Speed, Other Optimizations

2019-07-19 19:20:33

Zstd 1.4.1 is out today as a maintenance release to Facebook's Zstandard compression algorithm but with this update comes even more performance optimizations...

Oracle Linux 8 Released

2019-07-19 19:17:37

Oracle has announced the general availability of Oracle Linux 8. With the release, the core operating environment and associated packages for a typical Oracle Linux 8 server are distributed through a combination of BaseOS and Applications Streams. BaseOS gives you a running user space for the operating environment. Application Streams provides a range of applications that were previously distributed in Software Collections, as well as other products and programs, that can run within the user space.

First Preview Release Of Fedora CoreOS

2019-07-19 19:12:59

First Preview Release Of Fedora CoreOS

VMware To Acquire AI, ML Accelerator Bitfusion

2019-07-19 19:07:30

VMware is acquiring Austin, Texas-based Bitfusion in a move to boost its ability to support artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) workloads in its core vSphere virtualization platform. Bitfusion last year joined VMware’s Technology Alliance Partner program. It later linked its FlexDirect platform with VMware and Mellanox for attaching GPUs to any virtual machine (VM) and be part of a common infrastructure resource pool. Source: SDX Central

Hardware With GNU/Linux

2019-07-19 18:46:06

Linux Foundation ? where do thou go? ? Stay out of the Desktop and you shalt be paid Acer Chromebook R 11 C738T Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K02US Acer Chromebook 14 HP Chromebook 11 G5 - X9U02UT Acer Chromebook Spin 15 HP Chromebook x2 ASUS Chromebook Flip C213SA Samsung Chromebook Plus - XE513C24-K01US Samsung Chromebook Pro - XE510C25-K01US ASUS Chromebit CS10 ASUS Chromebook Flip C434 - C434TA-DSM4T Lenovo Chromebook S330 - 81JW0001US Data in a Flash, Part IV: the Future of Memory Technologies As it relates to memory technologies, the future looks very promising and very exciting. Will the SSD completely replace the traditional spinning HDD? I doubt it. Look at tape technology. It's still around and continues to find a place in the archival storage space. The HDD most likely will have a similar fate. Although until then, the HDD will continue to compete with the SSD in both price and capacity. Jonathan McDowell: Upgrading my home server At the end of last year I decided it was time to upgrade my home server. I built it back in 2013 as an all-in-one device to be my only always-on machine, with some attempt towards low power consumption. It was starting to creak a bit - the motherboard is limited to 16G RAM and the i3-3220T is somewhat ancient (though has served me well). So it was time to think about something more up to date. Additionally since then my needs have changed; my internet connection is VDSL2 (BT Fibre-to-the-Cabinet) so I have an BT HomeHub 5 running OpenWRT to drive that and provide core routing/firewalling. My wifi is provided by a pair of UniFi APs at opposite ends of the house. I also decided I could use something low power to run Kodi and access my ripped DVD collection, rather than having the main machine in the living room. That meant what I wanted was much closer to just a standard server rather than having any special needs. The first thing to consider was a case. My ADSL terminates in what I call the “comms room” - it has the electricity meter / distribution board and gas boiler, as well as being where one of the UniFi’s lives and where the downstairs ethernet terminates. In short it’s the right room for a server to live in. I don’t want a full rack, however, and ideally wanted something that could sit alongside the meter cabinet without protruding from the wall any further. A tower case would have worked, but only if turned sideways, which would have made it a bit awkward to access. I tried in vain to find a wall mount case with side access that was shallow enough, but failed. However in the process I discovered a 4U vertical wall mount. This was about the same depth as the meter cabinet, so an ideal choice. I paired it with a basic 2U case from X-Case, giving me a couple of spare U should I decide I want another rack-mount machine or two. read more

New Releases of GNU/Linux: Clonezilla, EasyOS and ARCOLINUX

2019-07-19 18:42:38

Stable Clonezilla live (2.6.2-15) Released This release of Clonezilla live (2.6.2-15) includes major enhancements and bug fixes. ENHANCEMENTS and CHANGES from 2.6.1-25 EasyOS version 1.0.92 1.1RC I already posted about French and German editions, this one is the English build. ARCOLINUX -D -B 19.7 read more

Debian-based deepin 15.11 Linux distribution now available for download

2019-07-19 18:14:26

deepin is the most beautiful desktop operating system on the planet, besting both macOS, and Windows. Hell, it is even prettier than all other Linux distributions too. And yes, that matters. While an operating system shouldn't impede productivity or behave obnoxiously, it should inspire the user. deepin does this. Today, the Debian-based deepin 15.11 becomes available, and it looks like another winner. While not radically different from deepin 15.10, it has enough bug fixes and additions to make it worthwhile. For instance, even though optical discs (CD, DVD, Blu-ray, etc.) are dramatically declining in popularity (near obsolete), the deepin devs have… [Continue Reading]

Oracle Linux 8 Released, Microsoft Offering Free Open-Source Software to Help Secure Voting Machines, Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" Cinnamon Beta Is Out, First Beta of Latte Dock for v0.9 Now Available and U

2019-07-19 17:51:39

News briefs for July 19, 2019.

How to reinstall a package using apt-get on a Debian or Ubuntu Linux

2019-07-19 17:49:00

The merciless roguelike "Jupiter Hell" goes Vulkan, with another free demo weekend now up

2019-07-19 17:30:51

Tags: Roguelike, Demo, Early Access, Upcoming, SteamJupiter Hell from ChaosForge is the successor to DoomRL (Doom the roguelike, now "DRL" after lawyers came knocking), it's a brutal and atmospheric roguelike and you can try it out again. Just recently, they gave it a pretty big update which comes with Vulkan support by default. However, if that causes you issues you can add "--gl" as a launch option to get it in OpenGL mode. That's not all! They've also pulled in Mark Meer (Commander Shepard - Mass Effect) to be the voice of "JupiterGuy", with some colourful voice lines which can be tweaked to be less foul if you wish. Additionally, a new and more difficult ULTRAVIOLENCE level is available for those who really like a challenge. There's also SMGs, each class now has a Skilled trait that improves their class active and passive abilities and quite a few other smaller changes. Free to try across the whole weekend, ahead of the Early Access release on August 1st. Just like the previous times, you do need a special Steam key to access the free demo. You need to hop onto their Discord Channel and message the "CRI Command" bot with the code "!Hell4U". It will then send you a Steam key instantly to access the demo. It's definitely worth spending a few hours with this weekend, it's quickly becoming my favourite roguelike. Atmospheric, brutal action, it looks damn good and for me the Linux version runs amazingly. Would you like to know more? Click here for the Steam page. Note: I personally pledged during their Kickstarter, but the developer gave me early access to test it after the campaign was finished.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Malware in PyPI Code Shows Supply Chain Risks

2019-07-19 17:30:00

A code backdoor in a package on the Python Package Index demonstrates the importance of verifying code brought in from code repositories.

Neon: A Wannabe Linux Distro For KDE Lovers

2019-07-19 17:11:52

KDE Neon is a bit of an oddball Linux thing. Linuxland has an impressive collection of oddball things. Neon looks and feels much like a Linux distribution, but its developers assert quite openly on their website that Neon is not a real Linux distro. It just installs and functions like one -- sort of. That can make deciding to use it a little confusing.

GLava - OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for desktop windows or backgrounds

2019-07-19 17:00:00

GLava is an OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for Linux.

Linux Execute Cron Job After System Reboot

2019-07-19 16:59:00

Brazil's Petrobras refuses to refuel Iran ships due to US sanctions

2019-07-19 16:45:09

US-listed Brazilian state oil giant Petrobras said Friday it will not refuel two Iranian vessels that have been stuck for weeks at a Brazilian port for fear of violating American sanctions.

IBM and Red Hat Leftovers

2019-07-19 16:36:50

Big Blue’s Red Hat Brings A Big Change Of Heart Perhaps, many years hence, we will call the company that, more than any other, created the enterprise computing environment Big Purple now that it has acquired the company that made open source software in the enterprise safe, sane, and affordable. Twenty years ago next month, Red Hat went public and everything about enterprise software changed. A company with some tens of millions of dollars in revenues, providing subscription support for a commercial Linux distribution for systems within a few months had a ridiculous market capitalization in excess of $20 billion and the mad dash for open source projects to be commercialized was on. Fast forward two decades, and Red Hat is the touchstone for how to work with upstream open source software projects related to datacenter infrastructure and to bring them downstream to harden them to be enterprise grade, package them up, and then sell support for them. Red Hat is by far and away the most successful provider of commercial support for open source code, and has moved well beyond its foundational Enterprise Linux distribution, mostly through key acquisitions including the companies behind the GNU compilers, JBoss application server, the KVM hypervisor, the Gluster parallel file system, the Ceph object storage, the innovative CoreOS Linux distribution, and the Ansible software provisioning tools as well as the OpenShift container controller (a mix of in-house and Kubernetes code these days), the OpenStack cloud controller, and the CloudForms hybrid cloud management system (also largely done in-house). Red Hat, we think, still needs to have a heavy duty open source database management system distribution – perhaps several different ones with different architectural tenets – but it was also perhaps prescient in that it stayed out of the Hadoop storage and data analytics racket, which has not panned out as planned. Splunk Connect for OpenShift: All About Objects This is the second post of our blog series on Red Hat OpenShift and Splunk Integration. In the first post, we showed how to send application and system logs to Splunk. The second part is focused on how to use Splunk Kubernetes Objects. Command Line Heroes season 3 episode 2: Learning the BASICs Command Line Heroes explores how beginner languages bring people into the world of programming. BASIC lowered the barrier to entry. Now, the next generation is getting their start modifying games, like Minecraft. Listen to the episode. Introducing Red Hat Smart Management for Red Hat Enterprise Linux How do you want to manage your systems? That probably depends a lot on the type of environment you have -- whether your systems are primarily on-prem, or if they reside in the cloud. Or a mixture of both. Either way, Red Hat is looking to meet you where you're at and provide management tools to suit your needs with Red Hat Smart Management. We introduced Red Hat Smart Management at Red Hat Summit earlier this year in Boston as a layered add on for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), as well as including Red Hat Insights with RHEL subscriptions. read more

Librem One Design Principles: Services You Can Trust

2019-07-19 16:31:58

Our hardware and software puts users back in control of computing–but, you may be wondering, can we do the same with our services? With Librem One, the answer is yes. We have big, no, huge dreams about what we can achieve with your support and the wealth of free software that already exists. But we need to keep our feet firmly on the ground. In this post we will outline the touchstones we have used to do just that–engineer trustworthy services that everyone can use–with a design process called user-centered software engineering. We hope it will facilitate communication with friends and colleagues as we hack towards a common goal… and also show all non-technical readers that human beings are at the center of our bits and bytes. So, how did we do it? Also: joining social media at DebConf19 read more

Programming Leftovers: Python, Go, LLVM and More

2019-07-19 16:26:41

Python List Sorting with sorted() and sort() In this article, we'll examine multiple ways to sort lists in Python. Python ships with two built-in methods for sorting lists and other iterable objects. The method chosen for a particular use-case often depends on whether we want to sort a list in-place or return a new version of the sorted list. ExpressPython: Lightweight, portable Python editor for small scripts There are many IDEs for Python, and it’s time for one more. ExpressPython is a lightweight, small code editor for Python 3. Originally built to help teach students how to code, it can be used in programming competitions, or just when you need a fast, small, clean code editor. There are a wide variety of Python IDEs and code editors available for programmers. Between PyCharm, VS Code, IDLE, Spyder, just to name a few, programmers have many to choose from depending on their needs and preferences. Add one more editor to the fray. ExpressPython is a small, lightweight Python 3 editor that can help with learning and competitive programming, such as coding challenges. Its creator started work on it in 2014 in order to fulfill a few needs, such as the ability to work offline. It is not made with the intent of becoming a fully-featured IDE, and does not include debugging features. However, it does have a few noteworthy features, so let’s take a look. Google's Go team decides not to give it a try The Go language will not be adding a "try" keyword in the next major version, despite this being a major part of what was proposed for version 1.14. Go, an open source language developed by Google, features static typing and native code compilation. It is around the 15th most popular language according to the Redmonk rankings. Error handling in Go is currently based on using if statements to compare a returned error value to nil. If it is nil, no error occurred. This requires developers to write a lot of if statements. "In general Go programs have too much code-checking errors and not enough code handling them," wrote Google principal engineer Russ Cox in an overview of the error-handling problem in Go. LLVM 9.0 Feature Work Is Over While LLVM 10.0 Enters Development Feature work is over on LLVM 9.0 as the next release for this widely-used compiler stack ranging from the AMDGPU shader compiler back-end to the many CPU targets and other innovative use-cases for this open-source compiler infrastructure. Ongoing LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg branched the LLVM 9.0 code-base this morning while in turn opening LLVM 10.0 development on trunk/master. This also marks the 9.0 branching for all LLVM sub-projects. Mu at EuroPython Mu made a number of appearances at last week’s wonderful EuroPython 2019 conference in Basel, Switzerland. PyCharm 2019.2 Release Candidate PyCharm 2019.2 is almost ready to be released, and we’re happy to announce that a release candidate is available for download now. read more

Security: EvilGnome Scaremongering, Intel Defects, New Patches and the "Desktop Security Nightmare"

2019-07-19 16:24:28

EvilGnome Is A Linux Spyware That Records Audio And Steals Your Files [Ed: FOSSBytes has moved on from pushing non-FOSS misinformation to actually doing anti-FOSS FUD. Painting malware one needs to actually install as a real threat.] CPU vulnerability mitigations keeping Linux devs busy: SUSE's Pavlík [Ed: Intel defects now waste software developers' time. They should just replace/recall those billions of defective chips] A veteran Linux kernel developer at Germany-based SUSE says the one thing that keeps him and his team busy these days is CPU vulnerability mitigations... Security updates for Friday Security updates have been issued by Debian (bzip2), Fedora (freetds, kernel, kernel-headers, and knot-resolver), openSUSE (bubblewrap, fence-agents, kernel, libqb, libu2f-host, pam_u2f, and tomcat), Oracle (vim), SUSE (kernel, LibreOffice, libxml2, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (libmspack and squid, squid3). The Desktop Security Nightmare Many of us have extremely sensitive data on our systems. Emails to family, medical or bank records, Bitcoin wallets, browsing history, the list goes on. Although we have isolation between our user account and root, we have no isolation between applications that run as our user account. We still, in effect, have to be careful about what attachments we open in email. Only now it’s worse. You might “npm install hello-world”, and audit hello-world itself, but get some totally malicious code as well. How many times do we see instructions to gem install this, pip install that, go get the other, and even curl | sh? Nowadays our risky click isn’t an email attachment. It’s hosted on Github with a README.md. Not only that, but my /usr/bin has over 4000 binaries. Have every one been carefully audited? Certainly not, and this is from a distro with some of the highest quality control around. What about the PPAs that people add? The debs or rpms that are installed from the Internet? Are you sure that the postinst scripts — which run as root — aren’t doing anything malicious when you install Oracle Virtualbox? [...] One thing a person could do would be to keep the sensitive data on a separate, ideally encrypted, filesystem. (Maybe even a fuse one such as gocryptfs.) Then, at least, it could be unavailable for most of the time the system is on. Of course, the downside here is that it’s still going to be available to everything when it is mounted, and there’s the hassle of mounting, remembering to unmount, password typing, etc. Not exactly transparent. I wondered if mount namespaces might be an answer here. A filesystem could be mounted but left pretty much unavailable to processes unless a proper mount namespace is joined. Indeed that might be a solution. It is somewhat complicated, though, since nsenter requires root to work. Enter sudo, and dropping privileges back to a particular user — a not particularly ideal situation, and complex as well. Still, it might well have some promise for some of these things. read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, Python Podcasts, User Error

2019-07-19 16:10:01

Ubuntu Podcast: S12E15 – Diablo This week we’ve been buying a new phone and playing with QEMU. We discuss the release fo Debian 10, Ubuntu users saying “Thank you”, Nvidia drivers, WSL and Ubuntu MATE for the GPD MicroPC. We also round up some events and tech news. It’s Season 12 Episode 15 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Stuart Langridge are connected and speaking to your brain. Episode #139: f"Yes!" for the f-strings Episode #221: Empowering developers by embedding Python How do we get kids excited about programming? Make programming tangible with embedded devices. Did you know that after kids learned to code with the BBC micro:bit, 90% of kids "thought coding was for everyone" and 86% said it made CS topics more interesting? Old and Insecure | User Error 70 Whether Linux is inherently secure, the next phase of online interaction, and wasting our free time. Plus where to focus your contributions, and a tricky hypothetical question. read more

Europol Head Fears 5G Will Give Criminals an Edge

2019-07-19 16:10:00

Catherine De Bolle is concerned law enforcement will lose its ability to track criminals with the arrival of 5G networks.

Graphics: Nouveau, Wayland's Weston and Libinput

2019-07-19 16:07:24

The Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Driver Gets A Batch Of Fixes For Linux 5.3 Originally on Thursday was finally the Nouveau-next 5.3 pull request that offered improvements to the display color management, fixes to Secure Boot on newer hardware, and Turing TU116 mode-setting support. But that was rejected by the DRM maintainers for being way too late as usually the cut-off for new feature material is when hitting RC6 on the previous cycle, just not days before the end of the current merge window. Not that those changes were all too exciting or notable, but this pushes back the color management and other work to Linux 5.4. Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs of Red Hat as a result today sent in Nouveau-fixes 5.3. This pull request has support still for the TU116 GPU since that shouldn't regress any existing support as well as having fixes around KMS, a memory leak, and a few other basic fixes. Wayland's Weston Lands A Pipewire Plug-In As New Remote Desktop Streaming Option Wayland's Weston compositor for the past year has provided a remoting plug-in for virtual output streaming that was built atop RTP/GStreamer. Now though a new plug-in has landed in the Weston code-base making use of Red Hat's promising PipeWire project. The PipeWire plug-in was merged into Weston today and is similar to the GStreamer-powered remoting plug-in but instead leverages PipeWire. The compositor's frames are exported to PipeWire and the same virtual output API is shared between these plug-ins. The virtual outputs can be configured using the weston.ini configuration file. Any PipeWire client in turn can read these frames. Libinput 1.14 RC Arrives With Better Thumb Detection & Dell Canvas Totem Support Linux input expert Peter Hutterer of Red Hat shipped the much anticipated release candidate today for libinput 1.14, the open-source input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland systems. libinput 1.13.901 The first RC for libinput 1.14 is now available. We have new and improved thumb detection for touchpads, thanks to Matt Mayfield. On Clickpad devices this should make interactions where a thumb is resting on the touchpad or dropped during an interaction more reliable. A summary of the changes can be found here: https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/07/libinputs-new-thumb-detection-code.html The Dell Canvas Totem is now supported by libinput. It is exposed as a new tool type through the tablet interface along with two new axes. Note that this is only low-level support, the actual integration of the totem needs Wayland protocol changes and significant changes in all applications that want to make use of it. A summary of the changes can be found here: https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/06/libinput-and-dell-canvas-totem.html Touch-capable tablets now tie both devices together for rotation. If you set the tablet to left-handed, the touchpad will be rotated along with the tablet. Note that this does not affect the left-handed-ness of the touchpad, merely the rotation. Tablet proximity out handling for tablets that are unreliably sending proximity out events is now always timeout-based. It is no longer necessary to add per-device quirks to enable this feature and it is completely transparent on devices that work correctly anyway. A summar of the changes can be found here: https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/06/libinput-and-tablet-proximity-handling.html Tablets that send duplicate tools (BTN_TOOL_PEN and BTN_TOOL_ERASER) now ignore the latter. This is an intermediate fix only but at least makes those tablets more usable than they are now. Issue #259 is the tracker for this particular behaviour if you are affected by it. The handling of kernel fuzz has been slightly improved. Where our udev rule fails to reset the fuzz on the kernel device, we disable the hysteresis and rely on the kernel now to handle it. Previously our hysteresis would take effect on top of the kernel's, causing nonresponsive behaviour. Note to distribitors: the python-evdev dependency has been dropped, the tools that used it are now using python-libevdev instead. And of course a random assortment of fixes, improvements, etc. Many thanks to all contributors and testers. As usual, the git shortlog is below. read more

How To Install the Apache Web Server on Debian 10

2019-07-19 16:07:18

This deep neural network fights deepfakes

2019-07-19 16:05:18

Seeing was believing until technology reared its mighty head and gave us powerful and inexpensive photo-editing tools. Now, realistic videos that map the facial expressions of one person onto those of another, known as deepfakes, present a formidable political weapon.

Mirai Groups Target Business IoT Devices

2019-07-19 16:00:00

More than 30% of Mirai attacks, and an increasing number of variants of the malicious malare, are going after enterprise IoT devices, raising the stakes for business.

Beginner's guide on how to git stash :- A GIT Tutorial

2019-07-19 16:00:00

Git Stash allows us to keep aside the current working directory & provides us with a clean working directory.

Kernel: F2FS, AMDGPU/AMDKFD, RISC-V

2019-07-19 15:48:47

F2FS Is The Latest Linux File-System With Patches For Case-Insensitive Support Following EXT4 getting initial (and opt-in) support for case-insensitive directories/files, the Flash-Friendly File-System has a set of patches pending that extend the case-folding support to this F2FS file-system that is becoming increasingly used by Android smartphones and other devices. Sent out today were a revised set of two patches and just 300+ lines of code that implement case-folding support inside the F2FS file-system. This case-folding support for case-insensitive file-name look-ups is based upon the support found within EXT4 on the latest kernels. AMDGPU/AMDKFD Queue Up Early Linux 5.3 Fixes For Navi & More While the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window isn't even over until this weekend when it will kick off with 5.3-rc1 and headlining new features like Radeon RX 5700 series support, AMD has already sent in a batch of AMDGPU/AMDKFD fixes. Making these fixes notable are some early fixes around the new open-source Radeon RX "Navi" support. RISC-V's Kernel Support Continues Maturing With Linux 5.3 With the RISC-V support in Linux 5.3 there is now support for huge-pages, image header support (based on the ARM64 kernel image header), initial page table setup is split into two stages, CONFIG_SOC support has been started with initially catering to the SiFive SoCs, high resolution timers and dynamic ticks have now made it into the default RISC-V 64-bit default configuration, and other low-level work. read more

Maestral Is A New Open Source Dropbox Client For Linux And macOS

2019-07-19 15:40:08

Maestral is a new open source Dropbox client for macOS and Linux, that's currently in beta. Its porpose is to have a Dropbox client that supports syncing to drives which use Btrfs, Ext3, ZFS, XFS or encrypted filesystems. It's also a lot lighter than the official Dropbox client.

deepin 15.11 - Better Never Stops

2019-07-19 15:35:52

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. deepin is an open source GNU/Linux operating system, based on Linux kernel and mainly on desktop applications, supporting laptops, desktops, and all-in-ones. It preinstalls Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE) and nearly 30 deepin native applications, as well as several applications from the open source community to meet users' daily learning and work needs. In addition, about a thousand applications are offered in Deepin Store to meet users' various requirements. Welcome to deepin 15.11 release. Compared with deepin 15.10, deepin 15.11 comes with new features - Cloud Sync in Control Center and disc burning function in Deepin File Manager. Besides, kwin window manager was fixed and optimized for better stability and compatibility, and a number of bugs were fixed. In deepin 15.11, you will enjoy smooth and better user experiences! read more

How To Set Up an OpenVPN Server on Debian 10

2019-07-19 15:34:25

Distribution Release: deepin 15.11

2019-07-19 15:26:43

deepin is a Debian-based distribution featuring the custom Deepin desktop environment and associated tools. The project has published a new stable release, deepin 15.11. The new version features a Cloud Sync feature in the control panel and introduces the ability to burn optical media through the distribution's file....

SBC runs Yocto or Debian on STM32MP1 SoC

2019-07-19 15:04:00

i2SOM offers its PanGu SBC based on ST’s dual-core STM32MP1 series SoC. It supports both Yocto and Debian and provides 1GB DRAM, HDMI, Ethernet, LCD, USB OTG, USB Host, TF Card, audio and other interfaces. i2SOM has unveiled its PanGu SBC based on the STMicroelectronics (ST) STM32MP1 series SoC. The PanGu Board uses the STM32MP157AAA3 version of the SoC series. This version combines a 650MHz Arm dual-core Cortex-A7 core and 209MHz Cortex-M4 coprocessor with an FPU, MPU, and DSP instructions. The PanGu Board integrates HDMI, 1000Mbps Ethernet, LCD, USB OTG, USB Host, TF Card, audio and other interfaces. The 70 mm × 105.5mm form factor board is designed for applications including industrial systems, the IoT, portable consumer electronics, automotive electronics and others. The PanGu supports Yocto Linux as well as the Jessie version of Debian. read more

Indian politicians are missing a huge edutech leap by ignoring Raspberry Pi and Linux

2019-07-19 14:57:17

Around a decade ago, an India-based company called Datawind got a nod from the Central government to make and market a low-cost tablet PC called Aakash for students in the country. About half a decade before that — 2004, to be exact — the country launched GSAT-3 aka EDUSAT, its first satellite to be used entirely for the education sector. Cut to the present, and it is more than two months since Datawind shut down permanently. Meanwhile, EDUSAT was deactivated in 2010, and has since been moved to a part of space that the world refers to as "graveyard orbit." They were both examples of a political class thinking a little too ahead of time when it came to the technology needed for education. Something similar is now happening at the other end of the spectrum: While the world is agog about the latest iteration of the Raspberry Pi and an increasing number of people is adopting one or the other distro of Linux, most of India seems to be oblivious to both. read more

Celebrating Kubernetes and 5 Years of Open Source

2019-07-19 14:56:05

Happy 5th Birthday to Kubernetes! The post Celebrating Kubernetes and 5 Years of Open Source appeared first on Linux Academy Blog.

Deepfake videos pose a threat, but 'dumbfakes' may be worse

2019-07-19 14:50:02

Sophisticated phony videos called deepfakes have attracted attention as a possible threat to election integrity. But a bigger problem for the 2020 U.S. presidential contest may be "dumbfakes." These are simpler and more easily unmasked bogus videos that are cheap and easy to produce.

Israel spyware firm can mine data from social media

2019-07-19 14:40:01

An Israeli spyware firm thought to have hacked WhatsApp in the past has told clients it can scoop user data from the world's top social media, the Financial Times reported Friday.

Daniel Pocock: Codes of Conduct and Hypocrisy

2019-07-19 14:39:07

In 2016, when serious accusations of sexual misconduct were made against a volunteer who participates in multiple online communities, the Debian Account Managers sent him a threat of expulsion and gave him two days to respond. Yet in 2018, when Chris Lamb decided to indulge in removing members from the Debian keyring, he simply did it spontaneously, using the Debian Account Managers as puppets to do his bidding. Members targetted by these politically-motivated assassinations weren't given the same two day notice period as the person facing allegations of sexual assault. Two days hardly seems like sufficient time to respond to such allegations, especially for the member who was ambushed the week before Christmas. What if such a message was sent when he was already on vacation and didn't even receive the message until January? Nonetheless, however crude, a two day response period is a process. Chris Lamb threw that process out the window. There is something incredibly arrogant about that, a leader who doesn't need to listen to people before making such a serious decision, it is as if he thinks being Debian Project Leader is equivalent to being God. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 10 tells us that Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations. They were probably thinking about more than a two day response period when they wrote that. Any organization seeking to have a credible code of conduct seeks to have a clause equivalent to article 10. Yet the recent scandals in Debian and Wikimedia demonstrate what happens in the absence of such clauses. As Lord Denning put it, without any process or hearing, members are faced with the arbitrary authority of the despot. read more

Israel spyware firm can mine data from social media: FT

2019-07-19 14:38:42

An Israeli spyware firm thought to have hacked WhatsApp in the past has told clients it can scoop user data from the world's top social media, the Financial Times reported Friday.

Kenya launches Africa's biggest wind farm

2019-07-19 14:27:13

Kenya on Friday inaugurated Africa's biggest wind power plant, a mammoth project in a gusty stretch of remote wilderness that now provides nearly a fifth of the country's energy needs.

Kenya to launch Africa's biggest wind farm

2019-07-19 14:27:13

Kenya will on Friday inaugurate Africa's biggest wind power plant, a mammoth project in a gusty stretch of remote wilderness that now provides nearly a fifth of its energy needs.

Oracle Linux 8 Released, Microsoft Offering Free Open-Source Software to Help Secure Voting Machines, Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" Cinnamon Beta Is Out, First Beta of Latte Dock for v0.9 Now Available and Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish Reaches End of Life

2019-07-19 14:26:46

News briefs for July 19, 2019. Oracle yesterday announced the release of Oracle Linux 8. New features include Application Streams, a "Dandified Yum", RPM improvements and much more. From the announcement: "With Oracle Linux 8, the core operating environment and associated packages for a typical Oracle Linux 8 server are distributed through a combination of BaseOS and Applications Streams. BaseOS gives you a running user space for the operating environment. Application Streams provides a range of applications that were previously distributed in Software Collections, as well as other products and programs, that can run within the user space." Microsoft this week announced it was giving away software to help secure American voting machines. According to NBC News, "The company said it was rolling out the free, open-source software product called ElectionGuard, which it said uses encryption to 'enable a new era of secure, verifiable voting.' The company is working with election machine vendors and local governments to deploy the system in a pilot program for the 2020 election. The system uses an encrypted tracking code to allow a voter to verify that his or her vote has been recorded and has not been tampered with, Microsoft said in a blog post." Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" Cinnamon beta was released this week. Some highlights in version 19.2 include improved kernel support in the update manager, improved software manager and a new look and layout for system reports. Go here to read about all the new features, and read the release notes here. The first beta of Latte Dock for v0.9 (v0.8.97) has been released. New features include a new colors mechanism, online indicator, shared layouts and more. v0.9 is scheduled for release at the end of the month. The Psifidotos blog notes that you can help by finding bugs or with translations. Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) officially reaches end of life today. Package updates will no longer be accepted to 18.10, and security notices will no longer include information or package updates for 18.10. To upgrade, visit https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DiscoUpgrades. News Oracle Microsoft Latte Dock Ubuntu Linux Mint

Games: Vagrus, Hive Quest, ATRIUM, GameMode, Elemental War, TerraTech, Higurashi When They Cry Hou, Citadel

2019-07-19 14:17:05

The dark strategy RPG "Vagrus - The Riven Realms" is doing well, quite an experience to play Currently in "Open Access" on Fig, a hybrid Early Access/Crowdfunding model, Vagrus - The Riven Realms seems to be doing well. It's only been going for a couple of months but they've already managed to raise $23,071. It's an interesting system, where you back the campaign with your pledge and get immediate access. At various funding points, it unlocks the next part of their development roadmap with the very next milestone very close to being hit. The strange real time strategy adventure "Hive Quest" is now on Kickstarter Love insects and other creepy crawlies? Hive Quest might be a game you will enjoy, one that's coming to Linux and it's now crowdfunding on Kickstarter. Inspired partially by the classic Black & White from Lionhead Studios, it's not meant to be graphically impressive. In fact, the developer opted to go for a more retro 3D look with it. Gameplay involves you managing a tribe, along with gathering resources like food to keep them going. It's a bit of an odd one, due to the mix of gameplay involved. It blends a strategy game with puzzles, exploration and a little mystery wrapped in an ancient magical theme with insects and spirits. Strategy game "ATRIUM" released recently, it's pretty much the game Carcassonne Carcassonne is that you? Well if you want to play something almost the same, ATRIUM just recently released from Black Potion. ATRIUM is a tile-based digital board game, where the board gets built as you go. On each turn, a player can place down a tile which you're given two at random each time and a person, with different tiles giving different benefits. Some might turn your people into a powerful character, some might give you extra points and so on. You basically play each turn, until you run out of tiles and the person who has the most territory wins. GameMode – A Tool To Improve Gaming Performance On Linux Ask some Linux users why they still sticks with Windows dual boot, probably the answer would be – “Games!”. It was true! Luckily, open source gaming platforms like Steam and Lutris have brought many games to Linux platforms and improved the Linux gaming experience significantly over the years. Today, I stumbled upon yet another Linux gaming-related, open source tool named GameMode, which allows the users to improve gaming performance on Linux. GameMode is basically a daemon/lib combo that lets the games optimise Linux system performance on demand. I thought GameMode is a kind of tool that would kill some resource-hungry tools running in the background. But it is different. What it does actually is just instruct the CPU to automatically run in Performance mode when playing games and helps the Linux users to get best possible performance out of their games. GameMode improves the gaming performance significantly by requesting a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS while playing the games. Tower Defense game "Elemental War" leaves Early Access today Leaving Early Access today after nine months with a fresh update is Elemental War, a Tower Defense game from Clockwork Origins. This one is a little unusual, in the way that unlike a lot of Tower Defense games there's no story campaign to play through. Instead it offers multiple game modes for single-player including a standard 60 wave defence mode, a survival mode to go as long as you can and a hero mode where your enemies are given random abilities. On top of that, there's also a level editor and a versus online mode to send waves against other players. Open-world sandbox adventure game "TerraTech" now has a co-op campaign for up to 4 players This is awesome. TerraTech is actually a really fun game for those who like to build vehicles and then go exploring and it just got a big update. Version 1.3 was released yesterday, building on the work they did in a previous update to give a co-op creative mode it now has a fully online co-op campaign mode. You will be sharing everything from the blocks available to the mission log, so it will require working together. Chapter 7 of Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now out with Linux support After waiting a whole year, the seventh chapter of the Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now available with Higurashi When They Cry Hou - Ch.7 Minagoroshi. Continuing to support Linux just like all the other chapters, this highly rated series is worth a look for anyone who enjoys a good mystery. This is a kinetic/sound novel, not one if you like to pick lots of options and change the story. It's a linear experience but still worth going through if you like your novels. Looks like Valve are developing another new game, something to do with "Citadel" Warm up that cup of speculation, as it appears Valve are working on another game that seems to be going by the name of Citadel. Linking into Half-Life, since the Citadel is the HQ from where the Combine govern Earth. Apparently though, this is entirely separate to the unannounced Half-Life VR game with Citadel being a completely different Source 2 project. As always though, do not take this as any form of confirmation. read more

Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Alpha Arrives, But Only for the GPD MicroPC

2019-07-19 14:10:09

An Ubuntu MATE 19.10 alpha snapshot is available for testing on the GPD MicroPC, a 6-inch compact laptop crowdfunded on IndieGoGo. This post, Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Alpha Arrives, But Only for the GPD MicroPC, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta

2019-07-19 14:05:25

Today we are looking at Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta. Feren OS Next is Feren's distro in development, a work in progress, but it is improving a lot and this is a major release for this distro, as it is now called Beta. It is based on Ubuntu 18.04.2, uses Linux Kernel 4.18 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3. It uses about 700MB of ram when idling. Since the last point release, its highly customized features have been stabilized, not perfect yet as expected, and new features and graphical art has been added. It is truly becoming a beautiful and unique KDE Plasma distro. Original/video: Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta Run Through read more

How to Find Out Top Directories and Files (Disk Space) in Linux

2019-07-19 14:00:00

As a Linux administrator, you must periodically check which files and folders are consuming more disk space.

The Problem with Proprietary Testing: NSS Labs vs. CrowdStrike

2019-07-19 14:00:00

Why apples-to-apples performance tests are the only way to accurately gauge the impact of network security products and solutions.

The dark strategy RPG "Vagrus - The Riven Realms" is doing well, quite an experience to play

2019-07-19 13:09:32

Tags: Indie Game, Early Access, Alpha, Crowdfunding, RPG, Strategy, UnityCurrently in "Open Access" on Fig, a hybrid Early Access/Crowdfunding model, Vagrus - The Riven Realms seems to be doing well. It's only been going for a couple of months but they've already managed to raise $23,071. It's an interesting system, where you back the campaign with your pledge and get immediate access. At various funding points, it unlocks the next part of their development roadmap with the very next milestone very close to being hit. Quite an interesting story to Vagrus - The Riven Realms. It's post-apocalyptic but not of the usual sort. In the past, a huge empire (that looks a little like the Romans) began to stagnate and so they became oppressors. Seeking out other nations, destroying them and enslaving people. Eventually the gods got pissed, came down and unleashed their wrath destroying the empire. The gods left, shocked at what they had done and this caused all sorts of horrors to be unleashed with other creatures slipping through cracks in reality and some of these ended up rebuilding the empire in their own image. After all that is where your story begins, as a Vagrus you're responsible for leading a caravan and attempting to carve out a life in a hostile environment. Watch video on YouTube.com The developer, Lost Pilgrims Studio, did provide me with a copy and thankfully it runs without issues on Manjaro. It's a Unity game, so there shouldn't be too many distribution-specific issues. It's quite text-heavy, so you need to be a good reader and enjoy reading to appreciate Vagrus - The Riven Realms. Due to this, it can be quite a slow game. I'm enjoying it so far though, the writing and events are really good and it's managed to keep undivided my attention. Quite a lot to take in though, thankfully there's a linear tutorial to teach you the basics of the game and it does a good job of not only being clear, it's a somewhat interesting bit of backstory too. It has the kind of story telling seen in games like Sunless Skies, reminds of that quite a bit. Although the combat is turn-based and feels a lot more like Darkest Dungeon. It has all the makings of an excellent game, with a great atmosphere. I don't often enjoy such games but this seems like something a little special. Feature highlight: Branching narrative in the form of interactive events Turn-based, tactical combat A vast, hand-crafted, sandbox world to explore Digitally hand-painted maps, environments, and 2D artwork A colorful cast of companions with their own storylines and caravan roles Over a hundred different enemies Dynamically changing victory conditions and stories An elaborate trade system Factions you can join or fight against Note: While the Windows and Mac versions are distributed via Discord, the Linux version is being done through itch.io since the Discord store doesn't support Linux. Really great that the developer is able to accommodate Linux backers. You just need to pick the extra Linux option, so they know where to give your key if you back it on Fig. Find it on Fig in Open Access. You can also wishlist/follow it on Steam.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Crack the Defenses of iOS and other Platforms at Black Hat USA

2019-07-19 13:00:00

Get the latest insights into how to attack and defend platforms like iOS, MacOS, and Windows 10 at this upcoming August security conference.

How to Install and Use WP CLI on Linux

2019-07-19 13:00:00

Learn to install the WordPress Command Line Interface (WP-CLI) on Linux.

Flexible user interface distribution for ubiquitous multi-device interaction

2019-07-19 12:45:41

KAIST researchers have developed mobile software platform technology that allows a mobile application (app) to be executed simultaneously and more dynamically on multiple smart devices. Its high flexibility and broad applicability can help accelerate a shift from the current single-device paradigm to a multiple one, which enables users to utilize mobile apps in ways previously unthinkable.

The Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Driver Gets A Batch Of Fixes For Linux 5.3

2019-07-19 12:38:03

With last week's big DRM pull request for Linux 5.3 that brought Navi support most notably on the AMD side while Intel received HDR display support, continued Icelake/Gen11 work, and more, there weren't any changes to the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver. It was another unfortunate cycle of no major improvements for the Nouveau driver but at least sent out today were a set of new "fixes" for this driver that remains crippled on Maxwell GPUs and newer...

Buying a Linux-ready laptop

2019-07-19 12:22:00

Recently, I bought and started using a Tuxedo Book BC1507, a Linux laptop computer. Ten years ago, if someone had told me that, by the end of the decade, I could buy top-quality, "penguin-ready" laptops from companies such as System76, Slimbook, and Tuxedo, I probably would have laughed. Well, now I'm laughing, but with joy! read more

Use Hackmd to collaborate on open source projects

2019-07-19 12:20:00

HackMD.io is an open source, collaborative Markdown editor. It allows people to share, comment, and collaborate on documents. As open source software, users can choose between using the online platform or installing it as a local service using the upstream project CodiMD. read more

How to Install Snap Applications in Arch Linux

2019-07-19 12:00:00

 MakeTechEasier: Snap applications are not available for Arch Linux by default

Enable bootsplash on Manjaro

2019-07-19 11:57:08

If you use Manjaro and you like to have a harmonic and beautiful Linux system from boot to desktop, follow me as i will show you in this tutorial how to enable and configure the bootsplash screen on Manjaro. Let's go

Decline of U.S. auto industry linked to midcentury shift in production models

2019-07-19 11:52:58

A massive shift in production models by American automakers to limit the impact of worker strikes may have unintentionally stifled innovation and led to the present decline of the U.S. auto industry, argues Vanderbilt sociologist Joshua Murray in a new book.

Data in a Flash, Part IV: the Future of Memory Technologies

2019-07-19 11:30:00

by Petros Koutoupis I have spent the first three parts of this series describing the evolution and current state of Flash storage. I also described how to configure an NVMe over Fabric (NVMeoF) storage network to export NVMe volumes across RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) and again over native TCP. [See Petros' "Data in a Flash, Part I: the Evolution of Disk Storage and an Introduction to NVMe", "Data in a Flash, Part II: Using NVMe Drives and Creating an NVMe over Fabrics Network" and "Data in a Flash, Part III: NVMe over Fabrics Using TCP".] But what does the future of memory technologies look like? With traditional Flash technologies that are enabled via NVMe, you should continue to expect higher capacities. For instance, what comes after QLC or Quad-Level Cells NAND technology? Only time will tell. The next-generation NVMe specification will introduce a protocol standard operating across more PCI Express lanes and at a higher bandwidth. As memory technologies continue to evolve, the method in which you plug that technology into your computers will evolve with it. Remember, the ultimate goal is to move closer to the CPU and reduce access times (that is, latencies). Figure 1. The Data Performance Gap as You Move Further Away from the CPU Storage Class Memory For years, vendors have been developing a technology in which you are able to plug persistent memory into traditional DIMM slots. Yes, these are the very same slots that volatile DRAM also uses. Storage Class Memory (SCM) is a newer hybrid storage tier. It's not exactly memory, and it's also not exactly storage. It lives closer to the CPU and comes in two forms: 1) traditional DRAM backed by a large capacitor to preserve data to a local NAND chip (for example, NVDIMM-N) and 2) a complete NAND module (NVDIMM-F). In the first case, you retain DRAM speeds, but you don't get the capacity. Typically, a DRAM-based NVDIMM is behind the latest traditional DRAM sizes. Vendors such as Viking Technology and Netlist are the main producers of DRAM-based NVDIMM products. The second, however, will give you the larger capacity sizes, but it's not nearly as fast as DRAM speeds. Here, you will find your standard NAND—the very same as found in modern Solid State Drives (SSDs) fixed onto your traditional DIMM modules. Go to Full Article

The strange real time strategy adventure "Hive Quest" is now on Kickstarter

2019-07-19 11:18:28

Tags: Indie Game, Unity, Crowdfunding, Upcoming, Strategy, ExplorationLove insects and other creepy crawlies? Hive Quest might be a game you will enjoy, one that's coming to Linux and it's now crowdfunding on Kickstarter. Inspired partially by the classic Black & White from Lionhead Studios, it's not meant to be graphically impressive. In fact, the developer opted to go for a more retro 3D look with it. Gameplay involves you managing a tribe, along with gathering resources like food to keep them going. It's a bit of an odd one, due to the mix of gameplay involved. It blends a strategy game with puzzles, exploration and a little mystery wrapped in an ancient magical theme with insects and spirits. Watch video on YouTube.com They're seeking £14,000 and it seems they've had quite a slow start to the campaign, with less than £500 pledged so far. Still 28 days to go, so it may pick up yet. It's only mentioning a Windows demo on the Kickstarter page, weirdly, but if you head to Indie DB the Linux demo is available and it does work as I previously tested it. The game is coming to Linux though of course, that's confirmed across the Kickstarter and the press kit. Find it on Kickstarter.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Virtual reality glove system takes shape in digital realm

2019-07-19 10:50:01

A glove focused on user experience in interacting with virtual objects is in the news. This virtual reality glove is the topic of a research article. The researchers described their virtual reality glove in detail in their paper, "Pneumatic actuator and flexible piezoelectric sensor for soft virtual reality glove system," in Scientific Reports.

New Linux Malware Called EvilGnome Discovered; First Preview of Fedora CoreOS Now Available; Germany Bans Schools from Using Microsoft, Google and Apple; VirtualBox 6.0.10 Released; and Sparky 5.8 Has

2019-07-19 10:42:47

News briefs for July 18, 2019.

Strategy game "ATRIUM" released recently, it's pretty much the game Carcassonne

2019-07-19 10:42:36

Tags: Board Game, Strategy, Itch.io, Steam, Indie Game, UnityCarcassonne is that you? Well if you want to play something almost the same, ATRIUM just recently released from Black Potion. ATRIUM is a tile-based digital board game, where the board gets built as you go. On each turn, a player can place down a tile which you're given two at random each time and a person, with different tiles giving different benefits. Some might turn your people into a powerful character, some might give you extra points and so on. You basically play each turn, until you run out of tiles and the person who has the most territory wins. Watch video on YouTube.com I have one pretty big complaint about it, which is the mostly useless tutorial. The English text is rough too which certainly doesn't help give me a full understanding of the rules. If it had a proper in-game guide (which all such games really should have), it would have been a lot better. I apparently won my first game, not that I had any clue how. No online play, single-player and local co-op only. For the local co-op, it's pretty basic as you both just use the mouse and place things when it's your turn. The biggest problem is how close to Carcassonne it seems, which the official adaption of only released on Steam back in 2017. It would have been interesting if they tried to make it more unique, as I certainly loved the idea being a fan of such games but to me it feels far too similar. If I was a developer of Carcassonne, I wouldn't be looking too kindly at this. There's being inspired by (without even mentioning it) and then there's this. You can find it on Steam and itch.io.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Wayland's Weston Lands A Pipewire Plug-In As New Remote Desktop Streaming Option

2019-07-19 10:25:17

Wayland's Weston compositor for the past year has provided a remoting plug-in for virtual output streaming that was built atop RTP/GStreamer. Now though a new plug-in has landed in the Weston code-base making use of Red Hat's promising PipeWire project...

Libinput 1.14 RC Arrives With Better Thumb Detection & Dell Canvas Totem Support

2019-07-19 10:07:40

Linux input expert Peter Hutterer of Red Hat shipped the much anticipated release candidate today for libinput 1.14, the open-source input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland systems...

Tower Defense game "Elemental War" leaves Early Access today

2019-07-19 10:01:18

Tags: Tower Defense, Strategy, Steam, Indie Game, New ReleaseLeaving Early Access today after nine months with a fresh update is Elemental War, a Tower Defense game from Clockwork Origins. This one is a little unusual, in the way that unlike a lot of Tower Defense games there's no story campaign to play through. Instead it offers multiple game modes for single-player including a standard 60 wave defence mode, a survival mode to go as long as you can and a hero mode where your enemies are given random abilities. On top of that, there's also a level editor and a versus online mode to send waves against other players. You can see some gameplay from a recent developer video below: Watch video on YouTube.com Feature Highlight: 65 different towers from a Ballista to a Volcano 3 singleplayer modes: Classic Mode, Survival Mode, Hero Mode 47 items from a Mithril Chassis to Deadly Poison Bombs 48 monster abilities from Gold Rush to Invincibility 7 settings from desert to ice world 21 different skills in multiplayer with multiple upgrades 107 different monsters containing 21 elementals 20 quests for bonus items in Hero Mode Truthfully, I haven't had the best time with Elemental War. After playing through quite a lot of Tower Defense games, nothing in Elemental War really stands out. I find the interface far too large and overbearing, making me feel boxed in. The zooming feature is rubbish too, requiring some heavy flicks on the mouse wheel for it to do anything and it jump-zooms, rather than smoothly scrolls in towards the map. The difficulty even on the highest mode is simply too easy and I end up bored with it. Most of my time was spent staring at a new wave appearing, then dying as soon as they enter the level due to the ability to just place towers right outside the portals. There's just no challenge in it. I did like the upgrade system though, taking down special enemies and then using their element to upgrade a tower. That's pretty cool but apart from that, it's just another TD game that doesn't really stand out from the crowd. Shame. Find it on Steam if you want to try it.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

A technique to improve machine learning inspired by the behavior of human infants

2019-07-19 10:00:01

From their first years of life, human beings have the innate ability to learn continuously and build mental models of the world, simply by observing and interacting with things or people in their surroundings. Cognitive psychology studies suggest that humans make extensive use of this previously acquired knowledge, particularly when they encounter new situations or when making decisions.

Kazakhstan Begins Intercepting HTTPS Internet Traffic Of All Citizens Forcefully

2019-07-19 09:53:41

If you are in Kazakhstan and unable to access the Internet service without installing a certificate, you're not alone. The Kazakhstan government has once again issued an advisory to all major local Internet Service Providers (ISPs) asking them to make it mandatory for all their customers to install government-issued root certificates on their devices in order to regain access to the Internet

Open-world sandbox adventure game "TerraTech" now has a co-op campaign for up to 4 players

2019-07-19 09:32:55

Tags: Adventure, Indie Game, Sandbox, Open World, Steam, Humble Store, UpdateThis is awesome. TerraTech is actually a really fun game for those who like to build vehicles and then go exploring and it just got a big update. Version 1.3 was released yesterday, building on the work they did in a previous update to give a co-op creative mode it now has a fully online co-op campaign mode. You will be sharing everything from the blocks available to the mission log, so it will require working together. Watch video on YouTube.com They also added even more blocks in this update too, mostly Hawkeye armour blocks. There's also a new Tech Manager available in the Campaign, Co-op Campaign, Creative, Co-op Creative and R&D modes which allows you to mess with non-player controlled tech. You can grab TerraTech on Humble Store and Steam.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Installing five flavours of Linux on my new laptop

2019-07-19 09:22:00

I got a very nice new laptop at a very good price, so I wiped Windows and installed Linux on it.

Chapter 7 of Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now out with Linux support

2019-07-19 09:15:43

Tags: Visual Novel, New Release, GOG, SteamAfter waiting a whole year, the seventh chapter of the Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now available with Higurashi When They Cry Hou - Ch.7 Minagoroshi. Continuing to support Linux just like all the other chapters, this highly rated series is worth a look for anyone who enjoys a good mystery. This is a kinetic/sound novel, not one if you like to pick lots of options and change the story. It's a linear experience but still worth going through if you like your novels. Watch video on YouTube.com Of course, you want to make sure you start with the first chapter, not one you can really skip through. Each chapter can take multiple hours to get through, thankfully though they're surprisingly engaging. If you've watched the Anime, this is still worth a look too as it goes into quite a bit more detail across various events. You can find Chapter 7 on GOG and Steam.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Looks like Valve are developing another new game, something to do with "Citadel"

2019-07-19 08:58:52

Tags: Speculation, Valve, Steam, VideoWarm up that cup of speculation, as it appears Valve are working on another game that seems to be going by the name of Citadel. Linking into Half-Life, since the Citadel is the HQ from where the Combine govern Earth. Apparently though, this is entirely separate to the unannounced Half-Life VR game with Citadel being a completely different Source 2 project. As always though, do not take this as any form of confirmation. You can see the video from Valve News Network below which is quite interesting: Watch video on YouTube.com I've no doubt that all the "leaks" that end up shipping with Valve games are completely intentional. They probably love seeing everyone try to guess what it's going to be. Will it be Half-Life 3? Probably not. Considering everything talked about in the video, it sounds like some sort of top-down game, possibly including some stealth elements. However, Valve are supposed to be launching a flagship VR game this year, which is likely Half-Life VR.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Powered by Plasma: ALBA Synchrotron in Barcelona, Spain

2019-07-19 08:57:19

As you go about your daily tasks, you’re probably unaware that Plasma runs on the computers in one of Europe’s largest research facilities. We were also oblivious – until we met Sergi Blanch-Torné at FOSDEM 2019. We’re always looking for interesting stories from people who use KDE software at their workplace, in school, or in government institutions. You can imagine our delight, then, when we met Sergi Blanch-Torné at this year’s FOSDEM. Sergi is a Controls Software Engineer at ALBA, a KDE user, and a Free software advocate and contributor. Not only was he willing to tell us about his favorite KDE apps, but he also works at one of the most amazing places on Earth! In this interview, he tells us what it’s like to work at ALBA, and answers the burning question: “what even is a synchrotron?”. ALBA is a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility in the Barcelona Synchrotron Park, in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain. Managed by the Consortium for the Construction, Equipping and Exploitation of the Synchrotron Light Source (CELLS), it is jointly funded by the Spanish and the Catalonian Administration. Aerial view of the ALBA facility. Source: CELLS media gallery. With its eight operational beamlines (and additional four in construction), ALBA has been serving more than 2000 researchers every year since first opening for experiments in 2010. It comprises a complex of electron accelerators that produce synchrotron light – electromagnetic radiation covering a continuum of wavelengths, ranging from infrared to hard X rays (including visible light). Synchrotron light is millions of times brighter than the surface of the Sun, which allows scientists to visualize atomic structures in extremely high resolutions. ALBA also happens to be the place where Plasma powers the majority of desktop computers in the controls department. Read more on this, plus a bunch of fascinating details on how synchrotrons work, in our interview with Sergi. Ivana Devcic: Sergi, thank you for accepting our invitation to the interview, and for taking the time out of your day to do this! Our story begins at this year's FOSDEM, where you met with developers from the KDE community, is that right? Sergi Blanch-Torné: That's right. I'm pretty much a regular at FOSDEM at this point. I think I attended it for the first time in 2004. One day at work, we had some trouble with Plasma. Conveniently, it was a few weeks before FOSDEM. I told my boss that there will surely be KDE people to ask for help, and there really were! And it was fun to find out they are from Catalonia too. So we arranged a visit with Aleix Pol and Albert Astals. They looked at the issue and found the right configuration that solved it. Ivana: Glad to hear you solved the issue! It would make for an awkward start to our interview otherwise. Could you please introduce yourself a bit to our readers? Sergi: Of course. I'm from Juneda, a small village in the west of Catalonia. Just 20 km away from the province capital Lleida. An hour and a half from the capital, Barcelona. I studied computer science at the University of Lleida. It was there that I started using KDE software, back in 1998. They are Linux evangelists at my university, and KDE's desktop environment was (and still is) the default desktop on the computers running Linux. I still contribute to my university with a yearly talk on how a computer scientist can end up in a weirder job than expected. After getting my Bachelor's degree, I went to an Erasmus project to the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, Netherlands. That's where I improved my English a lot. When I came back from Erasmus, I tried moving to another country, but ended up in Barcelona. The final project for my Bachelor's degree was related to Free software. I've had a great relationship with the Mathematics department, and there is a research group that works on cryptography. We thought of doing something practical that could be used by the Free Software community. At the time, the elliptic curve crypto wasn't really known to the general public, so we decided to prepare an implementation for GnuPG. I still maintain the website of our project. Sadly, I don't have the time to contribute with code any more, but I like to be in contact with the community. That's why every year at FOSDEM, we meet with Werner Koch, the project leader of GnuPG. Ivana: You've been involved with Free Software for quite a while. How did this lead to working at ALBA? Sergi: When I was looking for a job abroad after returning from Erasmus, I heard about the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility), the biggest synchrotron in Europe. I applied for a position there, and in one of the interviews in the hiring process they told me that a synchrotron was in construction near Barcelona. So I also applied there. Many of my current supervisors at ALBA were working at ESRF before. General view inside the facility. Photo by Sergi Blanch-Torné. Here at ALBA, I got a position in the controls section. We're part of the computing division that has different sections. One is called the Management Information System. That's where engineers who work mainly with the web and administrative applications. Then there are the people from infrastructure systems. And the sections for electronics and controls, that we have a lot in common with. Ivana: The controls section... Sounds exciting. But what exactly do you control from there? Sergi: To help you understand how it all works, maybe I should abstract first what a synchrotron is. A synchrotron is a kind of particle accelerator. In our case, it is an electron accelerator. You've probably heard about the LHC in CERN -- that's a collider, a very different facility, but also an accelerator. The difference is in the scale and in the purpose. At the LHC they have 27 kilometers in the circumference perimeter. We have about 400 meters. Colliders are made to produce those collisions we read about in the press, for discovering particles like the Higgs Boson. When those electrons in the accelerator are bent to maintain the circumference, they produce photons - basically, they generate light. In the LHC or other colliders, they like to set this light generation to the minimum. But in the synchrotrons, it is the light that is actually used. We could say that the accelerator itself is a bulb that generates an incredibly brilliant light. And it is because of this brilliance that those facilities are used, instead of other alternatives such as X-rays. There are experiments that require this kind of facility, because with a normal X-ray generator researchers would not be able to see what the experiment requires. In essence, you could also say that this is a big machine we use to see small things. We could even simplify it to the point of saying a synchrotron is like a huge microscope. It has applications in biology, chemistry, pharmacology... also in paleontology, or even art. Here at ALBA we did experiments on how a virus passes the membrane of a cell. We looked at the mechanisms of how the cell is invaded, and took pictures of that. We can also take a fossil and see inside - without having to crack it open and break it, we are able to see the remaining structure inside. Or we can stress a plastic to know how it will degrade under certain conditions. Sometimes famous artists used layers of paint to draw over something. We can see what's under the paint without destroying the layers. Beamline 24 end station, where the experiments happen. Photo by Sergi Blanch-Torné. Ivana: Fascinating! Sergi: It really is. And my job is to have the instruments under control and integrated to allow an experiment to be carried out. We provide the researchers with the tools they need, but we are rarely there when they're using the synchrotron. To have make sure an accelerator work correctly, many elements need to work together seamlessly. The electron beam is like, say, a train with its carriages. There is not a single electron, but a bunch revolving around in a circle. They are packed in bunches, and those bunches are separated from each other by 2 nanoseconds. So an extremely high level of precision is needed. First, there is a linear accelerator, with an electron gun that generates those bunches of electrons. We call it linac for short. This linac produces electron beams that travel at speeds close to the speed of light. Then they are passed through a booster ring, where they are accelerated even more. Even closer to the speed of light, but never reaching its physical bound. This acceleration process is repeated 3 times per second, and the beam is stored in a ring that is designed to generate this extremely brilliant light. For this whole process, there are hundreds or even thousands of elements to control. They have to work together, they have to be prepared to act just in that one precise moment. There are stepper motors, encoders, detectors, cameras, oscilloscopes, and even other weirder elements that need to work together. And we make sure they work properly. Ivana: Do you use any specialized software in your work? Sergi: Currently, the control room is running Debian 9 with Plasma. Almost everything in the controls section runs Linux. There are a few computers that require Windows because some manufacturers didn't provide the drivers for Linux... Computers in the control room, powered by Plasma. Photo by Sergi Blanch-Torné. As for the tools we use, the ESRF has been publishing the controls system as Free Software for decades now. There is a community of synchrotrons in Europe and many institutions and research facilities participate in this community. It's all about collaboration of several institutions and engineers like me in other facilities. In a way, it's exactly like in FOSS communities: we work on solving something that others can benefit from, and vice versa. To be more specific in terms of software, the distributed control system we use is called Tango. Ivana: It really does sound like your work has a lot in common with FOSS communities and their principles. After all, science and software freedom have always been intertwined. If I understood you correctly, you also write your own software at ALBA? Sergi: Yes, we make Free Software, and it's one of the reasons why I work here. I'm happy to have a job that produces Free Software. We are a public institution and, even though we make Free Software, there are things we still don't publish. That's why we have to keep pushing in this direction. Some of us have also participated in the FSFE “Public Money? Public Code!” campaign. It's an incredibly important initiative. Ivana: Can you share an example of what kind of software you produce? Sergi: Sure! From the control room, the people in charge of the facility need to have precise control of all the elements to ensure the stable control of the beam. They are not close to those elements, so it's necessary to be able to control everything remotely, from the network. And those people like graphical interfaces, so, a long time ago, we started a project based on Qt to build a framework that would make it easier to build those graphical interfaces. We called it Taurus. This is a LGPL framework, and since the latest release (4.5 at the time of writing), it supports Plasma 5. Screenshot of the Taurus software, courtesy of Sergi Blanch-Torné. Ivana: It’s nice to hear that. :) Apart from using Plasma as the desktop environment on your computers, do you use any other KDE apps at ALBA? Sergi: We are a scientific paper factory, so we use Kile and Okular all the time. In the controls section, we use Kate and KWrite quite often. Of course, there are also the Emacs people and the Vim users... Personally, I use KMail, Amarok, digiKam, and for my astronomy hobby, KStars. Whenever I show someone new how to start playing with a (domestic) telescope, KStars is the perfect application to learn everything you need to know. Ivana: We’ll make sure to forward the praise to the KStars team. Do you have any advice for young scientists who would like to work at ALBA or similar institutions? What kinds of skills should they have? Any particular programming languages that would be good to know? Sergi: For sure! The important thing is to apply. Apply to any job you think will make you happy. If there's a nice work opportunity, don't pass up on it. At ALBA, we work with C/C++ and Python. Sometime, but rarely in Java. I use Cython very often. There is a variety of skills that we, as a group, provide. One single person can't do everything alone, so the community aspect is crucial to us. Our work ranges from kernel drivers to graphical interfaces. Some of us are better in one area, some in another. The important thing is that in the end, the group is capable of working on the full stack. And the main driving force is that we're all contributing to science. Ivana: We hope you know your contributions are very much appreciated. This has been a fantastic interview – we’ve learned so many things! Thank you, Sergi. It would make us all happy if you could come to Akademy, KDE’s annual conference, so please think about it. :) Sergi: Thanks for having me! The next Akademy is in Italy, isn't it? I’ll be there. Would you like to meet KDE developers, or learn how to use Plasma in your company? Come to Milan, Italy, from September 7th to 13th and join us at Akademy! Our community conference is free and open to everyone.

IBM / Red Hat, Ubuntu & Nvidia, Firefox, Kdenlive, Syncthing, Huawei, Valve | This Week in Linux 74

2019-07-19 08:14:07

On this episode of This Week in Linux, AMD releases BIOS fix for the Linux booting issue, IBM closes on the landmark acquisition of Red Hat,and Ubuntu announces that Ubuntu LTS users will be getting the latest nvidia drivers much more easily.......................

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Server Planning A New Means For Automated Installations

2019-07-19 07:10:00

Canonical's server team is working on a new means of carrying out automated installations of Ubuntu Server in time for their 20.04 LTS release...

Setup Zsh + Powerline on Solus

2019-07-19 06:59:47

Have you asked yourself ? What is Zsh ? And why should I use it ? If yes, I will answer you briefly.The Z shell (Zsh) is a Unix shell that can be used as an interactive login shell and as a command interpreter for shell scripting. Zsh is an extended Bourne shell with a large number of improvements, including some features of Bash, ksh, and tcsh.If you are using Solus and you decided to switch your shell from bash to Zsh, I will show you how to Setup Zsh + Powerline on Solus.

Kernel: NVMe and VirtIO-IOMMU

2019-07-19 06:00:25

NVMe Patches to Allow macOS-Linux Dual Boot Under Review NVMe is a protocol used by Apple for PCIe solid state drives. It replaces the older Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI). On Tuesday, three NVMe patches were submitted to the Linux kernel to deal with Mac SSDs that use this protocol. VirtIO-PMEM Driver Added To Linux 5.3 For Paravirtualized Persistent Memory In addition to Linux 5.3 bringing a VirtIO-IOMMU driver, this next kernel version is bringing another new VirtIO virtual device implementation: PMEM for para-virtualized persistent memory support for the likes of Intel Optane DC persistent memory.  read more

Ubuntu/Debian: Comparison of Memory Usages, Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) End of Life and More

2019-07-19 05:57:17

Comparison of Memory Usages of Ubuntu 19.04 and Flavors in 2019 Continuing my previous Mem. Comparison 2018, here's my 2019 comparison with all editions of Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo". The operating system editions I use here are the eight: Ubuntu Desktop, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Budgie. I installed every one of them on my laptop and (immediately at first login) took screenshot of the System Monitor (or Task Manager) without doing anything else. I present here the screenshots along with each variant's list of processes at the time I took them. And, you can download the ODS file I used to create the chart below. Finally, I hope this comparison helps all of you and next time somebody can make better comparisons. Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) End of Life reached on July 18 2019 This is a follow-up to the End of Life warning sent earlier this month to confirm that as of today (July 18, 2019), Ubuntu 18.10 is no longer supported.  No more package updates will be accepted to 18.10, and it will be archived to old-releases.ubuntu.com in the coming weeks. The original End of Life warning follows, with upgrade instructions: Ubuntu announced its 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release almost 9 months ago, on October 18, 2018.  As a non-LTS release, 18.10 has a 9-month support cycle and, as such, the support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 18.10 will reach end of life on Thursday, July 18th. At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include information or updated packages for Ubuntu 18.10. The supported upgrade path from Ubuntu 18.10 is via Ubuntu 19.04. Instructions and caveats for the upgrade may be found at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DiscoUpgrades Ubuntu 19.04 continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes.  Announcements of security updates for Ubuntu releases are sent to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list, information about which may be found at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-security-announce Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users in homes, schools, businesses and governments around the world. Ubuntu is Open Source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs. On behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team, Adam Conrad CMake leverages the Snapcraft Summit with Travis CI to build snaps CMake is an open-source, cross-platform family of tools designed to build, test and package software. It is used to control the software compilation process and generate native makefiles and workspaces that can be used in any compiler environment.  While some users of CMake want to stay up to date with the latest release, others want to be able to stay with a known version and choose when to move forward to newer releases, picking up just the minor bug fixes for the feature release they are tracking. Users may also occasionally need to roll back to an earlier feature release, such as when a bug or a change introduced in a newer CMake version exposes problems within their project. Craig Scott, one of the co-maintainers of CMake, sees snaps as an excellent solution to these needs. Snaps’ ability to support separate tracks for each feature release in addition to giving users the choice of following official releases, release candidates or bleeding edge builds are an ideal fit. When he received an invitation to the 2019 Snapcraft Summit, he was keen to work directly with those at the pointy end of developing and supporting the snap system.  Ubuntu's Zsys Client/Daemon For ZFS On Linux Continues Maturing For Eoan Looking ahead to Ubuntu 19.10 as the cycle before Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, one of the areas exciting us with the work being done by Canonical is (besides the great upstream GNOME performance work) easily comes down to the work they are pursuing on better ZFS On Linux integration with even aiming to offer ZFS as a file-system option from their desktop installer. A big role in their ZoL play is also the new "Zsys" component they have been developing.  Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2019 Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. read more

RISC-V's Kernel Support Continues Maturing With Linux 5.3

2019-07-19 05:56:41

In-step with more RISC-V hardware becoming available over time, the Linux kernel architecture support for RISC-V has continued maturing and with Linux 5.3 is in better shape...

European Events: Apache and GStreamer

2019-07-19 05:54:48

ApacheCon Europe 2019 Schedule Revealed by The Apache Software Foundation If you’ve been following Apache Software Foundation (ASF) announcements for ApacheCon 2019, you must be aware of the conference in Las Vegas (ApacheCon North America) from September 9 to September 12. And, recently, they announced their plans for ApacheCon Europe 2019 to be held on 22-24 October 2019 at the iconic Kulturbrauerei in Berlin, Germany. It is going to be one of the major events by ASF this year. In this article, we shall take a look at the details revealed as of yet. GStreamer in Oslo Aaron discussed various ways to record RTSP streams when used with playbin and brought up some of his pending merge requests around the closed captioning renderer and Active Format Description (AFD) support, with a discussion about redoing the renderer properly, and in Rust. George discussed a major re-work of the gst-omx bufferpool code that he has been doing and then moved his focus on Qt/Android support. He mostly focused on the missing bits, discussing builds and infrastructure issues with Nirbheek and myself, and going through his old patches. read more

Latest Openwashing: Amazon, RedMonk/Microsoft/GitHub, Linux Foundation Energy, B2B on Red Hat/IBM Site

2019-07-19 05:51:59

The clearest sign of AWS' open source success wasn't built by Amazon [Ed: AWS is proprietary software, but one can always rely on Mac Asay to spin proprietary (like his employers past and  present) as "open". There's nothing "open" about AWS and in some sense it is even worse than traditional proprietary software because of the surveillance.] The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: June 2019 [Ed: Microsoft-funded 'analyst' RedMonk bases its "Programming" 'study' on Microsoft GitHub data, which is notoriously biased] Linux Foundation Energy member TenneT “open sources” their open source strategy [Ed: Another new example of openwashing by LF in a sector that usually relies on greenwashing to 'seem' or 'feel' "ethical"] TenneT is the first European cross-border electricity transmission system operator (TSO), with activities in the Netherlands and in Germany, providing uninterrupted electricity to over 41 million people. The security of our supply is among the best in Europe, with 99.99% grid availability. With the energy transition, TenneT is contributing to a future in which wind and solar energy are the most important primary sources to produce electricity. How to apply 'release early, release often' to build a better brand [Ed: Mere openwashing of the SPAM (B2B) ‘industry’] read more

Profit soars for Microsoft fueled by cloud, business services

2019-07-19 05:49:39

Microsoft on Thursday posted quarterly earnings that trounced expectations, citing growth in partnerships with companies on technology and cloud computing services.

Fast-growing web of doorbell cams raises privacy fears

2019-07-19 05:45:39

The woodsy community of Wolcott, Connecticut, doesn't see a lot of crime. But when the police chief heard about an opportunity to distribute doorbell cameras to some homes, he didn't hesitate.

Public Statement on Neutrality of Free Software

2019-07-19 05:45:27

F-Droid abandons neutrality to censor Gab oriented apps.

How To Flush Contents Of a Memcached Server Using Command Line

2019-07-19 04:06:00

AMDGPU/AMDKFD Queue Up Early Linux 5.3 Fixes For Navi & More

2019-07-19 04:00:00

While the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window isn't even over until this weekend when it will kick off with 5.3-rc1 and headlining new features like Radeon RX 5700 series support, AMD has already sent in a batch of AMDGPU/AMDKFD fixes. Making these fixes notable are some early fixes around the new open-source Radeon RX "Navi" support...

Security, DRM and Privacy

2019-07-19 03:33:47

Security updates for Thursday Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, firefox, and squid), CentOS (thunderbird and vim), Debian (libonig), SUSE (firefox, glibc, kernel, libxslt, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (libreoffice and thunderbird). EvilGnomes Linux malware record activities & spy on users [Ed: This is something the user actually installs, harming his/her machine. Original post here.]] Dubbed EvilGnomes by researchers; the malware was found masquerading as a Gnome shell extension targeting Linux’s desktop users. Mike Driscoll: New Malicious Python Libraries Found Targeting Linux They were written by a user named ruri12. These packages were removed by the PyPI team on July 9, 2019. However they were available since November 2017 and had been downloaded fairly regularly. See the original article for more details. As always, when using a package that you aren’t familiar with, be sure to do your own thorough vetting to be sure you are not installing malware accidentally. Latest Huawei 'Smoking Gun' Still Doesn't Prove Global Blackball Effort's Primary Justification We've noted a few times now how the protectionist assault against Huawei hasn't been supported by much in the way of public evidence. As in, despite widespread allegations that Huawei helps China spy on Americans wholesale, nobody has actually been able to provide any hard public evidence proving that claim. That's a bit of a problem when you're talking about a global blackballing effort. Especially when previous investigations as long as 18 months couldn't find evidence of said spying, and many US companies have a history of ginning up security fears simply because they don't want to compete with cheaper Chinese kit. That said, a new report (you can find the full thing here) dug through the CVs of many Huawei executives and employees, and found that a small number of "key mid-level technical personnel employed by Huawei have strong backgrounds in work closely associated with intelligence gathering and military activities." No love lost between security specialists and developers Unless you've been under a rock, you've noticed hardly a day goes by without another serious security foul-up. While there's plenty of blame to go around for these endless security problems, some of it goes to developers who write bad code. That makes sense. But when GitLab, a DevOps company, surveyed over 4,000 developers and operators, they found 68% of the security professionals surveyed believe it's a programmer's job to write secure code, but they also think less than half of developers can spot security holes. GitLab Survey Surfaces Major DevSecOps Challenges Ahead A report based on a survey of 4,071 software professionals published this week by GitLab, a provider of a continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) platform, found that while appreciation of the potential value of DevSecOps best practices is high, the ability to implement those practices is uneven at best. GitLab Survey Reveals Disconnect Between Developer And Security Teams In a survey conducted by GitLab, software professionals recognize the need for security to be baked into the development lifecycle, but the survey showed long-standing friction between security and development teams remain. While 69% of developers say they’re expected to write secure code, nearly half of security pros surveyed (49%) said they struggle to get developers to make remediation of vulnerabilities a priority. And 68% of security professionals feel fewer than half of developers are able to spot security vulnerabilities later in the lifecycle. Cook: security things in Linux v5.2 Over on his blog, Kees Cook runs through the security changes that came in Linux 5.2. Doctorow's novella "Unauthorized Bread" explains why we have to fight DRM today to avoid a grim future Salima has a problem: her Boulangism toaster is locked down with software that ensures that it will only toast bread sold to her by the Boulangism company… and as Boulangism has gone out of business, there's no way to buy authorized bread. Thus, Salima can no longer have toast. This sneakily familiar scenario sends our resourceful heroine down a rabbit hole into the world of hacking appliances, but it also puts her in danger of losing her home -- and prosecution under the draconian terms of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Her story, told in the novella “Unauthorized Bread,” which opens Cory Doctorow’s recent book Radicalized, guides readers through a process of discovering what Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) is, and how the future can look mightily grim if we don’t join forces to stop DRM now. “Unauthorized Bread” takes place in the near future, maybe five or ten years at most, and the steady creep of technology that takes away more than it gives has simply advanced a few degrees. Salima and her friends and neighbors are refugees, and they live precariously in low-income housing equipped with high-tech, networked appliances. These gizmos and gadgets may seem nifty on the surface, but immediately begin to exact an unacceptable price, since they require residents to purchase the expensive approved bread for the toaster, the expensive approved dishes for the dishwasher, and so on. And just as Microsoft can whisk away ebooks that people “own” by closing down its ebook service, the vagaries of the business world cause Boulangism to whisk away Salima’s ability to use her own toaster. New Linux Malware Called EvilGnome Discovered; First Preview of Fedora CoreOS Now Available; Germany Bans Schools from Using Microsoft, Google and Apple; VirtualBox 6.0.10 Released; and Sparky 5.8 Has New Live/Install Media for Download Germany has banned its schools from using cloud-based productivity suites from Microsoft, Google, and Apple, because the companies weren't meeting the country's privacy requirements. Naked Security reports, that the statement from the Hessische Beauftragte für Datenschutz und Informationsfreiheit (Hesse Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, or HBDI) said, "The digital sovereignty of state data processing must be guaranteed. With the use of the Windows 10 operating system, a wealth of telemetry data is transmitted to Microsoft, whose content has not been finally clarified despite repeated inquiries to Microsoft. Such data is also transmitted when using Office 365." The HBDI also stressed that "What is true for Microsoft is also true for the Google and Apple cloud solutions. The cloud solutions of these providers have so far not been transparent and comprehensible set out. Therefore, it is also true that for schools, privacy-compliant use is currently not possible." Microsoft, Google and Apple clouds banned in Germany’s schools Germany just banned its schools from using cloud-based productivity suites from Microsoft, Google, and Apple. The tech giants aren’t satisfying its privacy requirements with their cloud offerings, it warned. The Hessische Beauftragte für Datenschutz und Informationsfreiheit (Hesse Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, or HBDI) made the statement following a review of Microsoft Office 365’s suitability for schools. Microsoft, Google and Apple clouds banned in Germanys schools Did you know that Germany just banned its schools from using cloud-based productivity suites from Microsoft, Google, and Apple? The tech giants aren’t satisfying its privacy requirements with their cloud offerings, it warned. What are your thoughts? The Hessische Beauftragte für Datenschutz und Informationsfreiheit (Hesse Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, or HBDI) made the statement following a review of Microsoft Office 365’s suitability for schools. read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, Lunduke, Linux Journal, BSD Now and TLLTS

2019-07-19 03:31:07

Destination Linux EP130 - Linux 5.2, Debian 10, AMD, System76’s Thelio, Valve’s Steam Labs & more Debian 10, Linux Kernel 5.2, Pi 4 more Flaws, AMD News, System 76 Thelio and AMD, Nvidia Responds, Ubuntu Snaps, Red Hat & IBM Merge, Valve Rolls Out Steam Labs, Valve Early Access Dota Underlords Comparing Linux Package Formats - Deb, Flatpak, AppImage, etc. Episode 23: Advertisers: Don't Be Creepy Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Linux Journal's Danna Vedder about the current state of advertising. Twitching with OpenBSD | BSD Now 307 FreeBSD 11.3 has been released, OpenBSD workstation, write your own fuzzer for the NetBSD kernel, Exploiting FreeBSD-SA-19:02.fd, streaming to twitch using OpenBSD, 3 different ways of dumping hex contents of a file, and more. The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 817 read more

Fedora, Red Hat Learning Community and Kubernetes

2019-07-19 03:25:07

Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2 The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.2. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, July 22, 2019 through Monday, July 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details. Red Hat Learning Community fosters open source tech education and reaches 10k members We are pleased to announce that the Red Hat Learning Community has reached more than 10,000 members! Since its launch in September 2018, the community has shown itself to be a valuable hub for those seeking to share knowledge and build their open source skill set. When we first started out, this was just an idea. We set out to support, enable, and motivate new and experienced open source learners as they learn how to work with Red Hat technologies, validate their technical skill sets, build careers and pursue Red Hat Certifications. We soft launched the community in July 2018 and invited 400 Red Hat Training instructors, students, curriculum developers and certifications team members to jump-start community discussion boards and earn a founding member badge. skuba Dives into Open Source Waters SUSE CaaS Platform 4, our next major release is now in beta. It has major architectural improvements for our customers. In the process of planning and developing it, we took a close look at bootstrapping clusters and managing node membership, and we listened to our customers. One of the things we heard from many of them was that they wanted a way to deploy multiple clusters efficiently, by scripting the bootstrap process or by integrating it into other management tools they use. To address this, we committed even more strongly to our upstream participation in Kubernetes development. Instead of building SUSE-specific tools as we had in earlier versions, we contributed the efforts of SUSE engineers to the upstream kubeadm component, helping it bridge the gap between its current state and the abilities we had previously implemented in the Velum web interface. Our bootstrap and node management strategy in version 4 is built on kubeadm. Deprecated APIs Removed In 1.16: Here’s What You Need To Know As the Kubernetes API evolves, APIs are periodically reorganized or upgraded. When APIs evolve, the old API is deprecated and eventually removed. read more

Easy way to create a Debian package and local package repository

2019-07-19 03:16:47

This article describes a simple way to create a home made debian package and include it into a local package repository. Although we could use an existing Debian/Ubuntu package, we will start from scratch by creating and packaging our own trivial application. Once our package is ready, we will include it into our local package repository. This article illustrates a very simplistic approach, however it may serve as a template in many different scenarios.

PCLinuxOS KDE Darkstar 2019.07 Release

2019-07-19 03:10:03

I am pleased to announce the July 2019 release of the PClinuxOS KDE Darkstar is ready for download. read more

Crostini/Google Update

2019-07-19 03:07:38

Acer Chromebook R 13 It has Android Apps (Google Play) and Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until September 2021. HP Chromebook x360 14 It has Android Apps (Google Play) and Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until June 2024. Linux disk resizing on Chromebooks pushed back to Chrome OS 78 Back in March, I reported on an effort that would enable resizing of the Linux partition for Crostini-supported Chromebooks. At that time, I expected the feature to land in Chrome OS 75. I’ve checked for the feature now that Chrome OS 75 is available (again) and it’s nowhere to be seen. That’s because it was recently pushed back to Chrome OS 78. [...] However, other aspects need to be considered: Storage of large media files, for example, or enabling Google Drive synchronization with the Chrome OS Files app for offline file access. And then there are Android apps, so of which – particularly games – can require one or two gigabytes of space. So far, I haven’t run into any storage issues on my Pixel Slate with 128 GB of data capacity. But it’s easy to see that the Linux container is using up the bulk of my tablet’s storage: As I understand it, /dev/vdb is the Crostini container with Linux, which is 88 GB in size with 58 GB free. read more

Software: Maestral, GLava and Pitivi

2019-07-19 02:31:06

Maestral Is A New Open Source Dropbox Client For Linux And macOS Maestral is a new open source Dropbox client for macOS and Linux, that's currently in beta. It can be used both with and without a GUI, and it was created with the purpose of having a Dropbox client that supports folder syncing to drives which use filesystems like Btrfs, Ext3, ZFS, XFS or encrypted filesystems, which are no longer supported by Dropbox. GLava – OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for desktop windows or backgrounds Over the past few months, I’ve written lots of reviews of open source audio software, focusing mainly on music players. Linux has a mouthwatering array of open source multimedia tools, so I’m going to turn my attention wider afield from music players. Let’s start with some multimedia candy. GLava is an OpenGL audio spectrum visualizer for Linux. An audio visualizer works by extracting waveform and/or frequency information from the audio and feeds this information through some display rules, which produces what you see on the screen. The imagery is usually generated and rendered in real time and in a way synchronized with the music as it is played. GLava makes a real-time audio visualizer appear as if it’s embedded in your desktop background, or in a window. When displayed as the background, it’ll display on top of your wallpaper, giving the appearance of a live, animated wallpaper. GLava is a simple C program that sets up the necessary OpenGL and Xlib code for sets of 2D fragment shaders. The software uses PulseAudio to sync the desktop visualizer with any music source. Millan Castro: GSoC: First month working in Pitivi Pitivi is a video editor, free and open source. Targeted at newcomers and professional users, it is minimalist and powerful. This summer I am fortunate to collaborate in Pitivi development through Google Summer of Code. My goal is to implement an interval time system, with the support of Mathieu Duponchell, my menthor, and other members of the Pitivi community. An interval time system is a common tool in many video editors. It will introduce new features in Pitivi. The user will be able to set up a range of time in the timeline editor, playback specific parts of the timeline, export the selected parts of the timeline, cut or copy clips inside the interval and zoom in/out the interval. Mi proposal also includes the design of a marker system to store information at a certain time position. read more

Distribution Release: Oracle Linux 8.0

2019-07-19 02:19:14

Simon Coter has announced the release of Oracle Linux 8.0, the first stable version of the project's enterprise-class server distribution built from the source code of the recently-released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8: "Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 8. With Oracle Linux....

SAMBA versus SMB: Adversarial Interoperability is Judo for Network Effects

2019-07-19 02:07:31

Before there was Big Tech, there was "adversarial interoperability": when someone decides to compete with a dominant company by creating a product or service that "interoperates" (works with) its offerings. In tech, "network effects" can be a powerful force to maintain market dominance: if everyone is using Facebook, then your Facebook replacement doesn't just have to be better than Facebook, it has to be so much better than Facebook that it's worth using, even though all the people you want to talk to are still on Facebook. That's a tall order. Adversarial interoperability is judo for network effects, using incumbents' dominance against them. To see how that works, let's look at a historical example of adversarial interoperability role in helping to unseat a monopolist's dominance. The first skirmishes of the PC wars were fought with incompatible file formats and even data-storage formats: Apple users couldn't open files made by Microsoft users, and vice-versa. Even when file formats were (more or less) harmonized, there was still the problems of storage media: the SCSI drive you plugged into your Mac needed a special add-on and flaky driver software to work on your Windows machine; the ZIP cartridge you formatted for your PC wouldn't play nice with Macs. But as office networking spread, the battle moved to a new front: networking compatibility. AppleTalk, Apple's proprietary protocol for connecting up Macs and networked devices like printers, pretty much Just Worked, providing you were using a Mac. If you were using a Windows PC, you had to install special, buggy, unreliable software. And for Apple users hoping to fit in at Windows shops, the problems were even worse: Windows machines used the SMB protocol for file-sharing and printers, and Microsoft's support for MacOS was patchy at best, nonexistent at worst, and costly besides. Businesses sorted themselves into Mac-only and PC-only silos, and if a Mac shop needed a PC (for the accounting software, say), it was often cheaper and easier just to get the accountant their own printer and backup tape-drive, rather than try to get that PC to talk to the network. Likewise, all PC-shops with a single graphic designer on a Mac—that person would often live offline, disconnected from the office network, tethered to their own printer, with their own stack of Mac-formatted ZIP cartridges or CD-ROMs. [...] Someone attempting to replicate the SAMBA creation feat in 2019 would likely come up against an access control that needed to be bypassed in order to peer inside the protocol's encrypted outer layer in order to create a feature-compatible tool to use in competing products. Another thing that's changed (for the worse) since 1993 is the proliferation of software patents. Software patenting went into high gear around 1994 and consistently gained speed until 2014, when Alice v. CLS Bank put the brakes on (today, Alice is under threat). After decades of low-quality patents issuing from the US Patent and Trademark Office, there are so many trivial, obvious and overlapping software patents in play that anyone trying to make a SAMBA-like product would run a real risk of being threatened with expensive litigation for patent infringement. read more

Games: Netherguild, Queen's Quest 5: Symphony of Death, Warhammer 40,000: Gladius, Steam/Apollo 11

2019-07-19 02:05:24

Netherguild, a promising team-based turn-based strategy about adventuring deep underground Netherguild is a recent discovery that's currently in development from David Vinokurov. It's a turn-based rogue-lite strategy game, about sending a team deep below ground. Ready for another beautiful hidden object puzzler? Queen's Quest 5: Symphony of Death is out Queen's Quest 5: Symphony of Death from Brave Giant LTD and Artifex Mundi has released today, another fantastic looking hidden object game for a more casual experience. The Chaos Space Marines have arrived in Warhammer 40,000: Gladius Today Proxy Studios and Slitherine have released the latest DLC for the turn-based strategy game Warhammer 40,000: Gladius, with the Chaos Space Marines making their way across the planet. Also available today is a big save-breaking patch. Update 1.3, which is actually a pretty huge patch for the game adds in new items, new achievements, new tips, new settings, performance improvements, fixes to the AI, save game format improvements to reduce UI lag with large saves, a mod management screen and there's quite a bit more. Good to see it really well supported a year after the original release. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Steam has a sale on Lookout! Another sale is approaching! This time it's Valve's turn, with Steam having a space themed sale for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. read more

How To Automatically Disable Touchpad When Typing In Ubuntu

2019-07-19 00:48:06

Three ways to automatically disable Touchpad when typing in Ubuntu operating system and its variants like Linux Mint.

F2FS Is The Latest Linux File-System With Patches For Case-Insensitive Support

2019-07-19 00:31:13

Following EXT4 getting initial (and opt-in) support for case-insensitive directories/files, the Flash-Friendly File-System has a set of patches pending that extend the case-folding support to this F2FS file-system that is becoming increasingly used by Android smartphones and other devices...

The 'Linux' Foundation is Acting Like a Microsoft ISV Now, Commitment to Linux and FOSS Deteriorates Even Further

2019-07-18 23:33:46

The Linux Foundation has just announced a new Microsoft-funded initiative that's pushing GitHub and CLAs (passing copyrights on code to corporations)

Security Lessons From a New Programming Language

2019-07-18 22:30:00

A security professional needed a secure language for IoT development. So he wrote his own, applying learned lessons about memory and resources in the process.

A Cold Take on IBM, Red Hat and Their Hybrid Cloud

2019-07-18 22:20:41

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A Cold Take on IBM, Red Hat and Their Hybrid Cloud Hyperbole

2019-07-18 22:20:41

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Finding malformed markup

2019-07-18 22:19:26

HTML tags in non-HTML documents sometimes get messed up. This post describes a two-step procedure for locating most of the usual errors.

BitPaymer Ransomware Operators Wage Custom, Targeted Attacks

2019-07-18 21:30:00

A new framework is allowing the threat group to compile variants of the malware for each victim, Morphisec says.

Oracle Linux 8.0 Released

2019-07-18 21:02:42

In early May right before the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 we saw the public beta of Oracle Linux 8 while today Oracle Linux 8.0 has been promoted to stable and production ready. Oracle Linux 8.0 is available today as Oracle's re-build of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 and the features it brings while adding in some extras like the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel option along with D-Trace integration and other bits. The default kernel shipped by Oracle Linux 8.0 is a Linux 4.18 derived kernel that remains compatible with Red Hat's official RHEL8 kernel package. Also: Announcing the Release of Oracle Linux 8 read more

VirtIO-PMEM Driver Added To Linux 5.3 For Paravirtualized Persistent Memory

2019-07-18 20:57:02

In addition to Linux 5.3 bringing a VirtIO-IOMMU driver, this next kernel version is bringing another new VirtIO virtual device implementation: PMEM for para-virtualized persistent memory support for the likes of Intel Optane DC persistent memory...

SAP Contributes UI5 Web Component to Open Source community

2019-07-18 20:45:45

SAP has deepened its commitment to the developer and open source community with the contribution of UI5 Web Components, a comprehensive library for Web developers. The new UI5 Web Components from SAP allow developers to take advantage of the features offered by OpenUI5 while using other frameworks such as React, Angular or Vue.js. This library enables web developers to create enterprise-grade Web applications more easily. 

GitLab Survey Reveals Disconnect Between Developer And Security Teams

2019-07-18 20:19:50

In a survey conducted by GitLab, software professionals recognize the need for security to be baked into the development lifecycle, but the survey showed long-standing friction between security and development teams remain. While 69% of developers say they’re expected to write secure code, nearly half of security pros surveyed (49%) said they struggle to get developers to make remediation of vulnerabilities a priority. And 68% of security professionals feel fewer than half of developers are able to spot security vulnerabilities later in the lifecycle.

Comparing Linux Package Formats - Deb, Flatpak, AppImage, etc.

2019-07-18 20:17:56

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Optimize JPEG/JPG Images in Ubuntu with Jpegoptim

2019-07-18 20:15:59

In this article, we will describe how you can install the command line utility Jpegoptim on Ubuntu. We will also explain various ways in which you can use this application to optimize and compress your jpeg image files.

Introducing New Azure Hands-On Labs

2019-07-18 20:09:05

At Linux Academy, we have the most extensive learn-by-doing library of cloud training and the largest on-staff training team in the e-learning market. The post Introducing New Azure Hands-On Labs appeared first on Linux Academy Blog.

Episode 23: Advertisers: Don't Be Creepy

2019-07-18 19:57:55

Your browser does not support the audio element. Episode 23: Advertisers: Don't Be Creepy Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Linux Journal's Danna Vedder about the current state of advertising. Download ogg format

RDP Bug Takes New Approach to Host Compromise

2019-07-18 19:50:00

Researchers show how simply connecting to a rogue machine can silently compromise the host.

Open Source Hacking Tool Grows Up

2019-07-18 19:50:00

Koadic toolkit gets upgrades - and a little love from nation-state hackers.

8 Legit Tools and Utilities That Cybercriminals Commonly Misuse

2019-07-18 19:20:00

Threat actors are increasingly 'living off the land,' using publicly available management and administration tools to conceal malicious activity.

G7 ministers agree plan on digital tax but more work ahead

2019-07-18 19:10:02

Ministers from G7 top economies on Thursday reached consensus on steps towards an accord on taxing digital giants, an issue that has divided the United States and its allies Britain and France.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Steam has a sale on

2019-07-18 19:07:36

Tags: Steam, Game SaleLookout! Another sale is approaching! This time it's Valve's turn, with Steam having a space themed sale for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Some of the Linux native games on sale: Particle Fleet: Emergence - 80% off Planetary Annihilation: TITANS - 75% off Stellaris - 75% off FTL: Faster Than Light - 75% off Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth - 75% off Kerbal Space Program - 75% off Halcyon 6: Starbase Commander - 75% off Surviving Mars - 66% off (Also in the Humble Monthly) Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime - 60% off Starbound - 33% off See the special sales page here. Additionally, there's a lot more space themed games on sale that aren't on that page, find them here. There's actually some really good deals there, quite a few games at really low prices. This is coming only soon after their huge summer sale, it seems every store does a sale for every theme possible now, not that I am complaining it's good for my and your bank balance of course.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Security Things in Linux v5.2

2019-07-18 19:02:27

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How to Install Lighttpd on CentOS 7

2019-07-18 19:01:39

Lighttpd is a secure, open-source, fast, flexible and more optimized web server. Lighttpd has a high-speed infrastructure that allows for better performance with the same hardware when compared to other alternative web-servers. Lighttpd supports the FastCGI, SCGI and CGI interfaces and allows web applications that are written in any programming language to be used with the server. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Lighttpd on a Centos 7 VPS as well as set up MariaDB and PHP.

Poland, Lithuania probe Russian-made app behind viral old age selfies

2019-07-18 18:57:30

Poland and Lithuania said Thursday they were looking into the potential security risks of using a Russian-made face-editing app that has triggered a viral social media trend where users post "aged" selfies.

Facebook's Libra gets stark warning from G-7 finance chiefs

2019-07-18 18:50:18

Finance chiefs from the Group of Seven rich democracies issued a stark warning on Thursday that cryptocurrencies like Facebook's Libra should not be allowed before "serious regulatory and systemic concerns" are put in check.

Oakland, Calif., bars city from using facial recognition technology

2019-07-18 18:40:01

Oakland police and other city departments will not use facial recognition technology under a new policy—the third of its kind in the United States.

Oracle Linux 8.0 Released

2019-07-18 18:36:12

In early May right before the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 we saw the public beta of Oracle Linux 8 while today Oracle Linux 8.0 has been promoted to stable and production ready...

Is Facebook a bank? Congress pushes for answers on crypto foray

2019-07-18 18:20:02

After surviving a two-day battering on Capitol Hill, now comes the hard part for Facebook Inc.: turning its 12-page white paper into a legitimate cryptocurrency in the face of deep skepticism from central banks, regulators and politicians of all stripes.

The Strange Case of the Malicious Favicon

2019-07-18 18:00:32

During the past year, our Remediation department has seen a large increase in the number of fully spammed sites. The common factors are strangely named and unusually located favicon.ico files, along with the creation of “bak.bak” index files peppered around the website. In the majority of the cases, the pattern is similar regardless of the size of the website or the CMS being used. We have found WordPress, Magento, Joomla, and even HTML-only sites impacted by this campaign. Continue reading The Strange Case of the Malicious Favicon at Sucuri Blog.

Bulgarian Tax Breach Nets All the Records

2019-07-18 18:00:00

An attack by a 'wizard hacker' results in leaked records for virtually every Bulgarian taxpayer.

How Capture the Flag Competitions Strengthen the Cybersecurity Workforce

2019-07-18 18:00:00

These competitions challenge participants with problems involving digital forensics, cryptography, binary analysis, web security, and many other fields.

Disable SELinux on CentOS 7 / RHEL 7 / Fedora Linux

2019-07-18 17:51:56

Destination Linux EP130 - Linux 5.2, Debian 10, AMD, System76’s Thelio, Valve’s Steam Labs & more

2019-07-18 17:47:19

Debian 10, Linux Kernel 5.2, Pi 4 more Flaws, AMD News, System 76 Thelio and AMD, Nvidia Responds, Ubuntu Snaps, Red Hat & IBM Merge, Valve Rolls Out Steam Labs, Valve Early Access Dota Underlords

Social media, interactive AI tool can assist in saving lives during disasters, emergencies

2019-07-18 17:08:50

A platform to turn the growing sea of social media data into usable and lifesaving information in real time is advancing as more first responders and public safety agencies across the United States engage with the growing Social Media Analytics and Reporting Toolkit.

Slack Resets Passwords For Users Who Hadn't Changed It Since 2015 Breach

2019-07-18 17:04:38

If you use Slack, a popular cloud-based team collaboration server, and recently received an email from the company about a security incident, don't panic and read this article before taking any action. Slack has been sending a "password reset" notification email to all those users who had not yet changed passwords for their Slack accounts since 2015 when the company suffered a massive data

Peloton's Level 4 connection could turn page for trucking industry

2019-07-18 17:00:01

A Mountain View, California, company has a vision of driver assistive truck platooning as a potential change maker for the trucking industry—in a good way, namely, carrying with it safety and fuel efficiency.

How To Install Speedtest-cli On a CentOS / RHEL / Fedora Linux To Check Internet Speed

2019-07-18 16:40:00

LLVM 9.0 Feature Work Is Over While LLVM 10.0 Enters Development

2019-07-18 16:00:00

Feature work is over on LLVM 9.0 as the next release for this widely-used compiler stack ranging from the AMDGPU shader compiler back-end to the many CPU targets and other innovative use-cases for this open-source compiler infrastructure...

Slack Resets Passwords For Lazy Users Who Hadn't Changed It Since 2015 Breach

2019-07-18 15:50:39

If you use Slack, a popular cloud-based team collaboration server, and recently received an email from the company about a security incident, don't panic and read this article before taking any action. Slack has been sending a "password reset" notification email to all those users who had not yet changed passwords for their Slack accounts since 2015 when the company suffered a massive data

Getting Yesterdays or Tomorrows Day With Bash Shell Date Command

2019-07-18 15:43:00

Understanding Linux File Permissions

2019-07-18 15:18:38

In Linux & Unix operating system, everything is a file. It’s well organized in the form of files and directories. This tutorial helps Linux beginners to understand the Linux file permissions in detail.

Free dataset archive helps researchers quickly find a needle in a haystack

2019-07-18 15:00:01

Let's say you're doing research that requires millions of geotagged tweets. Or perhaps you're a journalist who wants to map murders in Chicago from 2001 to the present. You need to find large spatio-temporal datasets—but where?

The Chaos Space Marines have arrived in Warhammer 40,000: Gladius

2019-07-18 14:56:35

Tags: DLC, GOG, Steam, New ReleaseToday Proxy Studios and Slitherine have released the latest DLC for the turn-based strategy game Warhammer 40,000: Gladius, with the Chaos Space Marines making their way across the planet. Also available today is a big save-breaking patch. Update 1.3, which is actually a pretty huge patch for the game adds in new items, new achievements, new tips, new settings, performance improvements, fixes to the AI, save game format improvements to reduce UI lag with large saves, a mod management screen and there's quite a bit more. Good to see it really well supported a year after the original release. Watch video on YouTube.com Feature highlight: Boons of Chaos - Champions who prove themselves in battle might find boons bestowed upon them by the Dark Gods, and even rise to the rank of Daemon Prince. But beware, for the Gods are fickle, and those who they do not consider worthy will be transformed into Chaos Spawns instead. Veterans of the Long War - Chaos Space Marines have fought a 10,000 years long war on the Imperium and its Corpse-Emperor. All servants of the Imperium are their arch-enemy: as thus all Chaos Space Marines units have experience in fighting against Space Marine units and gain increased morale and melee accuracy. Unholy Rites - Chaos cities are designed to glorify the Dark Gods and torture their inhabitants in the Gods’ name. Population is a resource that Chaos Space Marines can use for unholy rites, granting significant temporary boosts depending on the God which is being worshipped. Mark of Chaos - Worship any of the four Chaos Gods, and spend influence to gain unique permanent buffs to individual units. The Dark Gods are generous! I have enjoyed quite a number of hours in it before this, especially with the previously released Tyranids DLC. It is a good game, great if you love both strategy games and Warhammer. I would still like the combat animations to be a bit more exciting but the rest seems good. You can pick up the game and DLC from Humble Store, GOG and Steam.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

AI radar system that can spot miniature drones 3 kilometers away

2019-07-18 14:51:02

DGIST announced on Tuesday, July 16 that Senior Researcher Dae-gun Oh's team in the Collaborative Robots Research Center developed a radar system that can detect subminiature drones that are 3km away. This research is expected to make huge contributions to strengthening domestic industries and defense capabilities by securing a world-class radar sensing technology.

79% of US Consumers Fear Webcams Are Watching

2019-07-18 14:50:00

Widespread privacy concerns have caused 60% of people to cover their laptop webcams - some in creative ways - survey data shows.

Ready for another beautiful hidden object puzzler? Queen's Quest 5: Symphony of Death is out

2019-07-18 14:37:29

Tags: Puzzle, Hidden Object, Steam, New Release, CasualQueen's Quest 5: Symphony of Death from Brave Giant LTD and Artifex Mundi has released today, another fantastic looking hidden object game for a more casual experience. A few months after stopping the intrigue of the evil queen and saving the fairy-tale land of Netherfall, King Robert asks for your help once again. This time the stakes are even higher. Children are disappearing from the capital and the suspicions fall on the local Pied Piper, playing his mesmerizing melodies. However, it quickly turns out that he is not the only one who came to the city and the case is much more complicated... and dangerous. I always adore the style in these games, they have such fabulous artwork you can see a lot of work goes into them. A very niche genre now but they usually get a few good reviews from players. Watch video on YouTube.com Features: An adventure for both enthusiasts and novice players of HOPA games Defeat a true crime virtuoso by solving 35 puzzles! Meet characters from fairy tales and folklore in over 40 locations! Prepare magical transformation potions! Learn the fate of Pied Piper in a exciting bonus adventure! To succeed as a gaming platform, Linux needs plenty of games across all genres, so it's good to see Artifex Mundi continue to publish their games on Linux. You can find it on Steam.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Corsair Force MP600 PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Linux

2019-07-18 14:32:18

One of the first PCIe Gen 4 NVMe SSDs to market has been the Corsair Force MP600. AMD included the Corsair MP600 2TB NVMe PCIe4 SSD with their Ryzen 3000 reviewer's kit and for those interested in this speedy solid-state storage here are some benchmarks compared to various other storage devices on Ubuntu Linux.

Hip and modern IBM can't beat legacy kit and services IBM: That's four consecutive quarters of revenue decline now

2019-07-18 14:27:05

8% cloud biz growth in 12 months. Where is Red Hat when you need it? IBM notched up its fourth straight quarter of revenue decline as the areas it deems strategic – hybrid cloud, AI and blockchain – couldn't paper over cracks in the legacy operations of big iron and outsourcing.…

Beginner's Guide to Building an Online Retail Web Shop Workshop: Domain-Specific Language

2019-07-18 14:24:50

With the release of Red Hat Decision Manager 7.3 I've started updating my free online workshop, a beginners guide to building an online retail web shop. The previous article covered creating a domain model for your online retail web shop.. This update is the for the fourth lab in this workshop, with more to follow. Learn how to create a domain specific language or DSL with Red Hat Decision Manager.

Kernel: Linux 5.3, DragonFlyBSD Takes Linux Bits, LWN Paywall Expires for Recent Articles

2019-07-18 14:22:36

Ceph updates for 5.3-rc1 Hi Linus, The following changes since commit 0ecfebd2b52404ae0c54a878c872bb93363ada36: Linux 5.2 (2019-07-07 15:41:56 -0700) are available in the Git repository at: https://github.com/ceph/ceph-client.git tags/ceph-for-5.3-rc1 for you to fetch changes up to d31d07b97a5e76f41e00eb81dcca740e84aa7782: ceph: fix end offset in truncate_inode_pages_range call (2019-07-08 14:01:45 +0200) There is a trivial conflict caused by commit 9ffbe8ac05db ("locking/lockdep: Rename lockdep_assert_held_exclusive() -> lockdep_assert_held_write()"). I included the resolution in for-linus-merged. Ceph Sees "Lots Of Exciting Things" For Linux 5.3 Kernel Ceph for Linux 5.3 is bringing an addition to speed-up reads/discards/snap-diffs on sparse images, snapshot creation time is now exposed to support features like "restore previous versions", support for security xattrs (currently limited to SELinux), addressing a missing feature bit so the kernel client's Ceph features are now "luminous", better consistency with Ceph FUSE, and changing the time granularity from 1us to 1ns. There are also bug fixes and other work as part of the Ceph code for Linux 5.3. As maintainer Ilya Dryomov put it, "Lots of exciting things this time!" The NVMe Patches To Support Linux On Newer Apple Macs Are Under Review At the start of the month we reported on out-of-tree kernel work to support Linux on the newer Macs. Those patches were focused on supporting Apple's NVMe drive behavior by the Linux kernel driver. That work has been evolving nicely and is now under review on the kernel mailing list. Volleyed on Tuesday were a set of three patches to the Linux kernel's NVMe code for dealing with the Apple hardware of the past few years in order for Linux to deal with these drives. On Apple 2018 systems and newer, their I/O queue sizing/handling is odd and in other areas not properly following NVMe specifications. These patches take care of that while hopefully not regressing existing NVMe controller support. DragonFlyBSD Pulls In The Radeon Driver Code From Linux 4.4 While the Linux 4.4 kernel is quite old (January 2016), DragonFlyBSD has now re-based its AMD Radeon kernel graphics driver against that release. It is at least a big improvement compared to its Radeon code having been derived previously from Linux 3.19. DragonFlyBSD developer François Tigeot continues doing a good job herding the open-source Linux graphics driver support to this BSD. With the code that landed on Monday, DragonFlyBSD's Radeon DRM is based upon the state found in the Linux 4.4.180 LTS tree. Destaging ION The Android system has shipped a couple of allocators for DMA buffers over the years; first came PMEM, then its replacement ION. The ION allocator has been in use since around 2012, but it remains stuck in the kernel's staging tree. The work to add ION to the mainline started in 2013; at that time, the allocator had multiple issues that made inclusion impossible. Recently, John Stultz posted a patch set introducing DMA-BUF heaps, an evolution of ION, that is designed to do exactly that — get the Android DMA-buffer allocator to the mainline Linux kernel. Applications interacting with devices often require a memory buffer that is shared with the device driver. Ideally, it would be memory mapped and physically contiguous, allowing direct DMA access and minimal overhead when accessing the data from both sides at the same time. ION's main goal is to support that use case; it implements a unified way of defining and sharing such memory buffers, while taking into account the constraints imposed by the devices and the platform. clone3(), fchmodat4(), and fsinfo() The kernel development community continues to propose new system calls at a high rate. Three ideas that are currently in circulation on the mailing lists are clone3(), fchmodat4(), and fsinfo(). In some cases, developers are just trying to make more flag bits available, but there is also some significant new functionality being discussed. clone3() The clone() system call creates a new process or thread; it is the actual machinery behind fork(). Unlike fork(), clone() accepts a flags argument to modify how it operates. Over time, quite a few flags have been added; most of these control what resources and namespaces are to be shared with the new child process. In fact, so many flags have been added that, when CLONE_PIDFD was merged for 5.2, the last available flag bit was taken. That puts an end to the extensibility of clone(). Soft CPU affinity On NUMA systems with a lot of CPUs, it is common to assign parts of the workload to different subsets of the available processors. This partitioning can improve performance while reducing the ability of jobs to interfere with each other. The partitioning mechanisms available on current kernels might just do too good a job in some situations, though, leaving some CPUs idle while others are overutilized. The soft affinity patch set from Subhra Mazumdar is an attempt to improve performance by making that partitioning more porous. In current kernels, a process can be restricted to a specific set of CPUs with either the sched_setaffinity() system call or the cpuset mechanism. Either way, any process so restricted will only be able to run on the specified CPUs regardless of the state of the system as a whole. Even if the other CPUs in the system are idle, they will be unavailable to any process that has been restricted not to run on them. That is normally the behavior that is wanted; a system administrator who has partitioned a system in this way probably has some other use in mind for those CPUs. But what if the administrator would rather relax the partitioning in cases where the fenced-off CPUs are idle and going to waste? The only alternative currently is to not partition the system at all and let processes roam across all CPUs. One problem with that approach, beyond losing the isolation between jobs, is that NUMA locality can be lost, resulting in reduced performance even with more CPUs available. In theory the AutoNUMA balancing code in the kernel should address that problem by migrating processes and their memory to the same node, but Mazumdar notes that it doesn't seem to work properly when memory is spread out across the system. Its reaction time is also said to be too slow, and the cost of the page scanning required is high. read more

How the Open Source Operating System Has Silently Won Over the World

2019-07-18 14:19:07

The current and future potential for Linux based systems is limitless. The system’s flexibility allows for the hardware that uses it to be endlessly updated. Functionality can, therefore, be maintained even as the technology around the devices change. This flexibility also means that the function of the hardware can be modified to suit an ever-changing workplace. For example, because the INSYS icom OS has been specifically designed for use in routers, this has allowed it to be optimised to be lightweight and hardened to increase its security. Multipurpose OS have large libraries of applications for a diverse range of purposes. Great for designing new uses, but these libraries can also be exploited by actors with malicious intent. Stripping down these libraries to just what is necessary through a hardening process can drastically improve security by reducing the attackable surfaces. Overall, Windows may have won the desktop OS battle with only a minority of them using Linux OS. However, desktops are only a minute part of the computing world. Servers, mobile systems and embedded technology that make up the majority are predominately running Linux. Linux has gained this position by being more adaptable, lightweight and portable than its competitors. read more

Operating-System-Directed Power-Management (OSPM) Summit

2019-07-18 14:05:23

The third Operating-System-Directed Power-Management summit he third edition of the Operating-System-Directed Power-Management (OSPM) summit was held May 20-22 at the ReTiS Lab of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna in Pisa, Italy. The summit is organized to collaborate on ways to reduce the energy consumption of Linux systems, while still meeting performance and other goals. It is attended by scheduler, power-management, and other kernel developers, as well as academics, industry representatives, and others interested in the topics. The future of SCHED_DEADLINE and SCHED_RT for capacity-constrained and asymmetric-capacity systems The kernel's deadline scheduling class (SCHED_DEADLINE) enables realtime scheduling where every task is guaranteed to meet its deadlines. Unfortunately SCHED_DEADLINE's current view on CPU capacity is far too simple. It doesn't take dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS), simultaneous multithreading (SMT), asymmetric CPU capacity, or any kind of performance capping (e.g. due to thermal constraints) into consideration. In particular, if we consider running deadline tasks in a system with performance capping, the question is "what level of guarantee should SCHED_DEADLINE provide?". An interesting discussion about the pro and cons of different approaches (weak, hard, or mixed guarantees) developed during this presentation. There were many different views but the discussion didn't really conclude and will have to be continued at the Linux Plumbers Conference later this year. The topic of guaranteed performance will become more important for mobile systems in the future as performance capping is likely to become more common. Defining hard guarantees is almost impossible on real systems since silicon behavior very much depends on environmental conditions. The main pushback on the existing scheme is that the guaranteed bandwidth budget might be too conservative. Hence SCHED_DEADLINE might not allow enough bandwidth to be reserved for use cases with higher bandwidth requirements that can tolerate bandwidth reservations not being honored. Scheduler behavioral testing Validating scheduler behavior is a tricky affair, as multiple subsystems both compete and cooperate with each other to produce the task placement we observe. Valentin Schneider from Arm described the approach taken by his team (the folks behind energy-aware scheduling — EAS) to tackle this problem. CFS wakeup path and Arm big.LITTLE/DynamIQ "One task per CPU" workloads, as emulated by multi-core Geekbench, can suffer on traditional two-cluster big.LITTLE systems due to the fact that tasks finish earlier on the big CPUs. Arm has introduced a more flexible DynamIQ architecture that can combine big and LITTLE CPUs into a single cluster; in this case, early products apply what's known as phantom scheduler domains (PDs). The concept of PDs is needed for DynamIQ so that the task scheduler can use the existing big.LITTLE extensions in the Completely Fair Scheduler (CFS) scheduler class. Multi-core Geekbench consists of several tests during which N CFS tasks perform an equal amount of work. The synchronization mechanism pthread_barrier_wait() (i.e. a futex) is used to wait for all tasks to finish their work in test T before starting the tasks again for test T+1. The problem for Geekbench on big.LITTLE is related to the grouping of big and LITTLE CPUs in separate scheduler (or CPU) groups of the so-called die-level scheduler domain. The two groups exists because the big CPUs share a last-level cache (LLC) and so do the LITTLE CPUs. This isn't true any more for DynamIQ, hence the use of the "phantom" notion here. The tasks of test T finish earlier on big CPUs and go to sleep at the barrier B. Load balancing then makes sure that the tasks on the LITTLE CPUs migrate to the big CPUs where they continue to run the rest of their work in T before they also go to sleep at B. At this moment, all the tasks in the wake queue have a big CPU as their previous CPU (p->prev_cpu). After the last task has entered pthread_barrier_wait() on a big CPU, all tasks on the wake queue are woken up. I-MECH: realtime virtualization for industrial automation The typical systems used in industrial automation (e.g. for axis control) consist of a "black box" executing a commercial realtime operating system (RTOS) plus a set of control design tools meant to be run on a different desktop machine. This approach, besides imposing expensive royalties on the system integrator, often does not offer the desired degree of flexibility for testing/implementing novel solutions (e.g., running both control code and design tools on the same platform). Virtual-machine scheduling and scheduling in virtual machines As is probably well known, a scheduler is the component of an operating system that decides which CPU the various tasks should run on and for how long they are allowed to do so. This happens when an OS runs on the bare hardware of a physical host and it is also the case when the OS runs inside a virtual machine. The only difference being that, in the latter case, the OS scheduler marshals tasks among virtual CPUs. And what are virtual CPUs? Well, in most platforms they are also a kind of special task and they want to run on some CPUs ... therefore we need a scheduler for that! This is usually called the "double-scheduling" property of systems employing virtualization because, well, there literally are two schedulers: one — let us call it the host scheduler, or the hypervisor scheduler — that schedules the virtual CPUs on the host physical CPUs; and another one — let us call it the guest scheduler — that schedules the guest OS's tasks on the guest's virtual CPUs. Now what are these two schedulers? That depends on the virtualization platform. They are always different, in the sense that it will never happen that, at runtime, a scheduler has to deal with scheduling virtual CPUs and also scheduling tasks that want to run on those same virtual CPUs (well, it can happen, but then you are not doing virtualization). They can be the same, in terms of code, or they can be completely different from that respect as well. Rock and a hard place: How hard it is to be a CPU idle-time governor In the opening session of OSPM 2019, Rafael Wysocki from Intel gave a talk about potential problems faced by the designers of CPU idle-time-management governors, which was inspired by his own experience from the timer-events oriented (TEO) governor work done last year. In the first place, he said, it should be noted that "CPU idleness" is defined at the level of logical CPUs, which may be CPU cores or simultaneous multithreading (SMT) threads, depending on the hardware configuration of the processor. In Linux, a logical CPU is idle when there are no runnable tasks in its queue, so it falls back to executing the idle task associated with it (there is one idle task for each logical CPU in the system, but they all share the same code, which is the idle loop). Therefore "CPU idleness" is an OS (not hardware) concept and if the idle loop is entered by a CPU, there is an opportunity to save some energy with a relatively small impact on performance (or even without any impact on performance at all) — if the hardware supports that. The idle loop runs on each idle CPU and it only takes this particular CPU into consideration. As a rule, two code modules are invoked in every iteration of it. The first one, referred to as the CPU idle-time-management governor, is responsible for deciding whether or not to stop the scheduler tick and what to tell the hardware to do; the second one, called the CPU idle-time-management driver, passes the governor's decisions down to the hardware, usually in an architecture- or platform-specific way. Then, presumably, the processor enters a special state in which the CPU in question stops fetching instructions (that is, it does literally nothing at all); that may allow the processor's power draw to be reduced and some energy to be saved as a result. If that happens, the processor needs to be woken up from that state by a hardware event after spending some time, referred to as the idle duration, in it. At that point, the governor is called again so it can save the idle-duration value for future use. read more

A squeaky clean: Friendly robots spruce up Singapore

2019-07-18 14:00:03

Hundreds of "friendly" robots that speak multiple languages and sing are being rolled out across hi-tech Singapore, to help clean the city-state's hotels, shopping malls and government buildings.

US senator Schumer calls for investigation into FaceApp

2019-07-18 14:00:02

Popular Russia-based application FaceApp, which allows users to change their appearance to look older or younger, came under fire in the United States Wednesday, with one senator urging an FBI investigation.

Calculating the Value of Security

2019-07-18 14:00:00

What will it take to align staff and budget to protect the organization?

Red Hat/IBM and Fedora Leftovers

2019-07-18 13:53:07

An introduction to cloud-native CI/CD with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 offers a developer preview of OpenShift Pipelines, which enable the creation of cloud-native, Kubernetes-style continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipelines based on the Tekton project. In a recent article on the Red Hat OpenShift blog, I provided an introduction to Tekton and pipeline concepts and described the benefits and features of OpenShift Pipelines. OpenShift Pipelines builds upon the Tekton project to enable teams to build Kubernetes-style delivery pipelines that they can fully control and own the complete lifecycle of their microservices without having to rely on central teams to maintain and manage a CI server, plugins, and its configurations. IBM's New Open Source Kabanero Promises to Simplify Kubernetes for DevOps At OSCON, IBM unveiled a new open source platform that promises to make Kubernetes easier to manage for DevOps teams. MySQL for developers in Red Hat OpenShift As a software developer, it’s often necessary to access a relational database—or any type of database, for that matter. If you’ve been held back by that situation where you need to have someone in operations provision a database for you, then this article will set you free. I’ll show you how to spin up (and wipe out) a MySQL database in seconds using Red Hat OpenShift. Truth be told, there are several databases that can be hosted in OpenShift, including Microsoft SQL Server, Couchbase, MongoDB, and more. For this article, we’ll use MySQL. The concepts, however, will be the same for other databases. So, let’s get some knowledge and leverage it. What you need to know to be a sysadmin The system administrator of yesteryear jockeyed users and wrangled servers all day, in between mornings and evenings spent running hundreds of meters of hundreds of cables. This is still true today, with the added complexity of cloud computing, containers, and virtual machines. Looking in from the outside, it can be difficult to pinpoint what exactly a sysadmin does, because they play at least a small role in so many places. Nobody goes into a career already knowing everything they need for a job, but everyone needs a strong foundation. If you're looking to start down the path of system administration, here's what you should be concentrating on in your personal or formal training. Building blocks of syslog-ng Recently I gave a syslog-ng introductory workshop at Pass the SALT conference in Lille, France. I got a lot of positive feedback, so I decided to turn all that feedback into a blog post. Naturally, I shortened and simplified it, but still managed to get enough material for multiple blog posts. PHP version 7.2.21RC1 and 7.3.8RC1 Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages. RPM of PHP version 7.387RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 28-29 and Enterprise Linux. RPM of PHP version 7.2.20RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 28-29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux. QElectroTech version 0.70 RPM of QElectroTech version 0.70, an application to design electric diagrams, are available in remi for Fedora and Enterprise Linux 7. A bit more than 1 year after the version 0.60 release, the project have just released a new major version of their electric diagrams editor. read more

Volvo Cars defies slowing market to hit record sales

2019-07-18 13:45:21

Volvo Cars, the Swedish luxury brand owned by China's Geely, defied a slowing global auto market to set a record for sales in the first half of the year, although US trade war tariffs and falling prices squeezed profits.

Better design could make mobile devices easier for seniors to use

2019-07-18 13:40:02

A loud "bing" sounded as we drove onto the highway access ramp. I didn't see a message on our car's screen. Was it my phone or my wife's? Was it a calendar alert, or did one of us receive a text message? Was it the low battery warning on one of our hearing aids? Was it our home security system? Maybe the car needed an oil change or lost tire pressure? Should we stop in heavy traffic or ignore it?

No love lost between security specialists and developers

2019-07-18 13:36:10

GitLab finds 68% of security professionals feel that less than half of developers can spot security vulnerabilities, but most people feel it's a programmer's job to write secure code.