Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Magazine, This Week in Linux, Open Source Security Podcast and Linux Gaming News Punch

2019-06-25 01:18:17

GNOME Shell & Mutter See Their 3.33.3 Releases With Notable X11/Wayland Changes

2019-06-25 00:57:00

How to setup AMule and control it via web interface on a Raspberry Pi

2019-06-25 00:56:37

Servers for WordPress: Special Considerations

2019-06-25 00:45:47

While a traditional LEMP stack will work for hosting WordPress, it won't perform optimally, and it certainly won't be able to handle any significant amount of traffic. However, with a few special considerations, WordPress can be both snappy and scalable.

Fedora Workstation 31 Is Looking Great With Many Original Features Being Worked On

2019-06-25 00:00:00

Fedora Workstation 31 is shaping up to be another exciting release for this Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. As usual, a ton of original upstream features are being worked on for this innovative desktop/workstation Linux spin...

Wayland's Weston 6.0.1 Released With Build System Fixes & Other Corrections

2019-06-24 23:21:32

Weston 6.0 was released back in March with a remote/streaming plug-in and Meson becoming the preferred build system among other improvements. Weston 6.0.1 was released today by Simon Ser with various fixes to this reference Wayland compositor...

0.4.1 Release of Elisa

2019-06-24 23:17:08

Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users. We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android). We are creating a reliable product that is a joy to use and respects our users privacy. As such, we will prefer to support online services where users are in control of their data. read more

DDoS-for-Hire Services Doubled in Q1

2019-06-24 22:45:00

Impact of FBI's takedown of 15 'booter' domains last December appears to have been temporary.

A Socio-Technical Approach to Cybersecurity's Problems

2019-06-24 22:45:00

Researchers explore how modern security problems can be solved with an examination of society, technology, and security.

Using i3 with multiple monitors

2019-06-24 21:52:01

Are you using multiple monitors with your Linux workstation? Seeing many things at once might be beneficial. But there are often much more windows in our workflows than physical monitors — and that’s a good thing, because seeing too many things at once might be distracting.

Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 18

2019-06-24 21:43:05

Tags: GOL PodcastComing in on the newly scheduled day of Monday, the weekly round-up podcast Linux Gaming News Punch Episode 18 is now here. Watch video on YouTube.com Audio feeds: MP3: Download | RSS Feed OGG: Download | RSS Feed Also available on Spotify. Topics covered, click me Canonical, Ubuntu, Valve and 32bit [1 - 2 - 3 - 4] Streets of Rogue Dota Underlords A Year Of Rain ISLANDERS Eagle Island Epic Games, Wine and stuff What a week! I'm exhausted.

Health Insurer Reports Data Breach That Began 9 Years Ago

2019-06-24 21:20:00

Dominion National first spotted something awry in April of 2019.

Microsoft's New Windows Terminal Is Now Available

2019-06-24 21:06:00

You can now download a preview version of the new Windows Terminal app from the Store on Windows 10. From a report: Microsoft released this application on the evening of June 21 after a listing showed up earlier that day. After downloading the Windows Terminal app from the Store, you can take advantage of all the new features-- including tabs, finally! You can combine tabs from the traditional Command Prompt, Linux Bash instances, and PowerShell in the same window. It's a deeply customizable environment, too. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

189 lives changed - By Linux

2019-06-24 20:50:29

In May of this year, I received a call from a teacher from the high school here in Taylor. She asked me if we could accommodate 189 new students. Could we provide these 189 kids their first-time computers. I did a quick inventory in my head of what we had and what was parojected and told her yes. I then began calling my Directors, telling them of the upcoming project.

Canonical Releases Linux Kernel Security Patch for 64-Bit PowerPC Ubuntu Systems

2019-06-24 20:44:00

Canonical released today a new Linux kernel security update for several of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases to address a security issue affecting 64-Bit PowerPC systems. Affecting the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating systems, the new Linux kernel security patch fixes a vulnerability (CVE-2019-12817) on 64-bit PowerPC (ppc64el) systems, which could allow a local attacker to access memory contents or corrupt the memory of other processes. "It was discovered that the Linux kernel did not properly separate certain memory mappings when creating new userspace processes on 64-bit Power (ppc64el) systems. A local attacker could use this to access memory contents or cause memory corruption of other processes on the system," reads the security advisory. Users are urg...

Researchers create multi-junction solar cells from off-the-shelf components

2019-06-24 20:25:54

Multi-junction solar cells are both the most efficient type of solar cell on the market today and the most expensive type of solar cell to produce. In a proof-of-concept paper, researchers from North Carolina State University detail a new approach for creating multi-junction solar cells using off-the-shelf components, resulting in lower cost, high-efficiency solar cells for use in multiple applications.

2 Simple Steps to Set up Passwordless SSH Authentication In Linux

2019-06-24 19:36:09

If you would like to automate many things in Linux based systems, the first requirement is to set up a passwordless SSH authentication between the Linux systems. It can be done easily by two simple steps. In this tutorial we will explain how to set up passwordless SSH login on Linux system.

Canonical returning 32-bit Ubuntu Linux support after gaming uproar

2019-06-24 18:44:00

32-bit software should be functionally obsolete, but it turns out to live on in a 64-bit computing world. So, Canonical is putting 32-bit libraries back in to its next Ubuntu Linux releases.

Ubuntu Reverses Decision, Says It Will Continue To Support 32-bit Packages

2019-06-24 18:40:00

Canonical has issued a statement on Ubuntu's 32-bit future, saying it will continue to build and maintain a 32-bit archive going forward. From a report: Of course, there was some negativity surrounding the decision -- as is common with everything in the world today. In particular, developers of WINE were upset, since their Windows compatibility layer depends on 32-bit, apparently. In a statement, Canonical said: "Thanks to the huge amount of feedback this weekend from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community, we will change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. We will put in place a community process to determine which 32-bit packages are needed to support legacy software, and can add to that list post-release if we miss something that is needed. Community discussions can sometimes take unexpected turns, and this is one of those. The question of support for 32-bit x86 has been raised and seriously discussed in Ubuntu developer and community forums since 2014. That's how we make decisions." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Distribution Release: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1

2019-06-24 18:17:14

The SUSE team has announced the release of a new service pack (SP) for SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE). The new update, SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1, offers security improvements, techniques to reduce downtime during security patches, and a smoother transition from openSUSE Leap to SUSE Linux Enterprise: "Improved....

Windows Event Log Types | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure

2019-06-24 17:59:05

When it comes to security, the more information we have, the more easily we can pinpoint malicious activities. The post Windows Event Log Types | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure appeared first on Linux Academy Blog.

Canonical foolishly backpedals on 32-bit packages in Ubuntu Linux

2019-06-24 17:59:04

Having an open mind and admitting when you are wrong is a noble quality. Those that are stubborn and continue with bad ideas just to save face are very foolish. With all of that said, sometimes you have to stick with your decisions despite negative feedback because you know they are right. After all, detractors can often be very loud, but not necessarily large in numbers. Not to mention, you can't please everyone, so being indecisive or "wishy-washy" in an effort to quash negativity can make you look weak. And Canonical looks very weak today. When the company announced it was… [Continue Reading]

Ubuntu Reverses Decision, Says It Will Continue To Support 32-bit Apps

2019-06-24 17:58:53

Canonical has issued a statement on Ubuntu’s 32-bit future — and gamers, among others, are sure to relieved! The company says Ubuntu WILL now continue to build and maintain a 32-bit archive going forward — […] This post, Ubuntu Reverses Decision, Says It Will Continue To Support 32-bit Apps, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Why is Your Website a Target? The SEO Value of a Website

2019-06-24 17:55:43

Website security is what we eat, sleep, and breathe. It’s what we do best because we deal with hacked websites every single day, thousands of them. Among the various types and evolution in attack scenarios, one has remained the same for all these years—spam infections. A spam infection could be a serious problem for online businesses when it remains on the website long enough for Google, Bing, or other website blacklist authorities to spot it and block site access. Continue reading Why is Your Website a Target? The SEO Value of a Website at Sucuri Blog.

Oaths, coalitions and betrayal — some thoughts on Total War: THREE KINGDOMS

2019-06-24 17:49:00

Tags: Feral Interactive, Review, Steam, StrategyThe latest entry in the Total War franchise has had me battling all over China in a bid to obtain the mandate of heaven. Becoming emperor is easier when you've got good friends. Watch video on YouTube.com   Note: Key provided by Feral Interactive Total War: THREE KINGDOMS was released in its all-caps glory about a month ago and saw a same-day Linux release thanks to porters Feral Interactive. The action this time around is centered in China during its fractious Three Kingdoms period of history that saw the end of the Han dynasty and warlords and coalitions battle it out for supremacy. More specifically, this Total War title also takes inspiration from the Romance of the Three Kingdoms novel and its larger-than-life heroes and villains. Developer Creative Assembly has put in plenty of time and effort to capture the feeling of both novel and the historical conflict. At the heart of this design philosophy is the option to play the turn-based campaign in Romance mode. Veteran players that have played other Total War titles such as the Warhammer entries may be familiar with the prominence that hero units and leaders have come to take in the series. Romance mode continues this trend by making it so the commanders of retinues are key to warfare. They lead troops, use abilities to buff allies and hamper enemies, can stand up to dozens of regular troops and fight duels with enemy commanders. A more classic mode, where regular troops feature more prominently, is also available but I spent the majority of my time with the game playing in Romance mode. The character-heavy approach definitely feels like a good call. They may be outsized influences in battle but characters also play important roles outside of it. As turns pass and factions expand or are wiped out, characters develop traits and affinities for other characters. Friendships and rivalries spring up and may have consequences beyond the immediate; the most obvious result is that an unhappy character may be more willing to betray their master or a foe that’s been treated with honor may be more willing to accept a player’s overlordship later in the game. Titles, higher salaries, technology, items and other factors may also influence how characters feel and contribute to the emergent storytelling. When it comes to these characters and their relationships, the game competently balances micromanagement potential and the amount of time you need to worry about them. The end result is that I felt invested enough to care that my characters got on well together and that they worked towards a common goal. Small details like characters going berserk if their oathsworn brother falls in battle are a great touch and reward of sorts for caring. It’s simple to tell when two characters don’t get along as well, and not that costly to reassign them elsewhere. So it should never come as a surprise that the more ambitious and imperious characters may eventually alienate most other characters in events and through other means before staking it out on their own, perhaps founding their own faction in the process. Most of your faction’s objectives are completed in stages with some level of historicity thrown into the mix. As might be expected, most of these are about warring and hegemony. From time to time, things may be shook up by special events particular to your faction or characters in your employ, following story threads from the Romance of the Three Kingdoms novel. These are mostly for flavor’s sake and some of the decisions are serious no-brainers to choose because they have no downsides other than changing history. Which, you know, you’re probably doing anyways by conquering up China. It’s a system that could do with some better trade-offs for the sake of variety. Diplomacy has traditionally been a weaker part of these games but Three Kingdoms makes a good effort to change things up. Relationships can be more complicated than the usual alliances and vassalage with temporary coalitions and actions dominating the early game. You can haggle with and bribe the AI as always but the faction leaders are swayed by more than just money and the relationship between characters can also be a decisive factor. Things are much more organic and from humble beginnings a haphazard coalition of shared values can become an ironclad military alliance up until the end of the game. It pays to play the diplomatic game and, while military conquest remains the easiest way to expand, having good allies and trade relations can mean the difference between a successful campaign outcome and a stalled one. The espionage system promises similar complexity and depth. By embedding a character into a faction, you can manipulate their standing and their career path and perform various actions that might be to your advantage. In other words, you can do things like to tell a general that secretly works for you to leak the location of an army or an administrator to encourage corruption in a province. The problem with this is that it’s both time and cash-consuming. However cool the idea of having a man on the inside to bring down a rival might be, the results aren’t sure certain. There’s a risk your agent can get in too deep and defect. A lot of the time the wage you’re paying these spies is money better spent on armies and upgrades. Let’s not kid ourselves—this is still a game about warfare. Beating armies, taking settlements and selling your loot continues to be a major source of resources throughout most of the game. Some factions have special characteristics that allow for better trade, diplomacy and whatever else but the only way that you’re going to win things in the end is by making sure you have the best and strongest armies. The large emphasis on battle almost dwarfs the empire-building economics side of the game. Provinces and settlements can get upgrades and improvements, with branching build chains and specialization options. I played several campaigns as different factions and my overall impression is that very little of this actually matters. So long as you have ae surplus of food and income, it doesn’t matter which cities have decreased recruitment costs or specialize in commerce instead of industry. Retinues recruit globally and reinforce in friendly areas so all that is really required from your cities is to be a net contributor to your faction. Investment is a balancing act done to make sure cities don’t rebel, that they generate money and have sufficient defenses. That said, I never really cared about conquering or defending a city other than what it meant for its strategic position. At higher difficulties, maximizing profits and minimizing corruption and waste can be a life-or-death issue. But that’s just not going to be the experience of the average player and so it’s mostly safe to spend most of your attention elsewhere. Likewise, the technology tree feels bolted on and static—every several turns you unlock something new along a branch. The technologies themselves can be big boosts to under-performing areas of your faction but aren’t game-changers in of themselves. It doesn’t pay to specialize too much as you’ll miss out on basic units and buildings if you simply dedicate yourself to one branch. As opponents also unlock things with you, these tend to feel less like milestones and mere regular powerups. All that said, sense of challenge and competition remains constant until the later stages of the campaign. It’s only once the titular three kingdoms come into play and one of them is battered beyond recovery that the familiar Total War endgame slog rears its head. The increased distances, the proliferation of vassals and stronger economic base can make humbling your last rival a drawn-out affair. By the time the AI is willing to abdicate its claim to emperorship, it is usually already been reduced to a shell of its former glory by your experienced armies. For your armies to get experienced, they’re going to fight a lot. And the core warfare experience is one of the best in the series. Moving armies around on the map, minding supply levels, reinforcing retinues, and advanced actions like ambushes are easy to do and understand. The emphasis on characters in Romance mode makes it easier to specialize armies as each character is classified as a different type of leader. These leaders may specialized in ranged units, shock cavalry or whatever else and managing their strengths and weaknesses by pairing them with other complementary types of generals is vital. As usual, the turn-based strategy yields to real-time battle whenever two armies clash. Things like terrain, unit morale and commander’s bonuses come into play as battle is joined. While some features like delegating part of your army to AI control are missing, the core Total War gameplay remains intact. Ordering around units is simple and these tactical engagements remain as exhilarating as ever. Winning total victories because of good use of archers and shock cavalry against a stronger opponent is satisfying no matter if the battle is set in ancient China, dark ages Britain or a fantasy setting. There’s a few idiosyncrasies when it comes to unit types and a abilities as always but this remains part the polished core of the strategy title. Fighting is overall fun but not without its pitfalls. The tactical battle AI is a competent opponent most of the time but it’s not brilliant by any stretch. It can be baited by units to expose cracks in its line without difficulty and it can be stupidly inflexible about positions on the map. On one occasion, I was attacked by a superior force on the AI’s turn and forced to do battle. I arrayed my forces, decided to wear them down as they advanced before trying to use cavalry to hit the flanks when they were charging at my battle line. I positioned my forces only to find out that the enemy refused to move at all. The attacking force stayed still, staring beyond the field at my lines. Taunts of varying levels of wit were exchanged with my generals but, for the entirety of the 60 minute battle, the AI stayed still. My generals got to enjoy a really beautiful sunset as a result but that’s not typically the real objective of an enemy attacking you, right? Incidents like that are few and far in between in all fairness. I can only think of three or so battles that the AI was completely hopeless at in several dozen hours of gameplay. The greater point is that Creative Assembly has yet to truly nail it. This is something minimized by playing against a human opponent but given that the Linux port segregates fellow penguins and macOS players from the general population, it’ll probably take a lot more effort for a casual player to find a fair match. Let alone organize a multiplayer campaign with anything but a friend on the same platform. I think that the atmosphere of the game has deftly found its mark. The music, art style and voice overs are all great. I appreciated the fact that I could switch the voiced language to Chinese. This is one of the more immersive entries in the Total War franchise and it’s lovely to see the important landmarks and features of China rendered faithfully. Armies also look good and zooming into the action during a battle is a treat. I don’t really have any complaints regarding the technical side of things. While I haven’t bothered to do comprehensive benchmarks, Feral’s port is consistent with little in the way of dips. I took a few glances at random Windows benchmarks floating on the net and my performance is in the same ballpark. I did experience some crashing while I was playing some of my campaigns but it was rare and possibly already fixed by the several patches since I started playing. I’ve critiqued systems and AI plenty but the biggest issue I’ve had with this game has to do with its learning curve. Simply put: there’s too much for players to absorb at once in the beginning. The game tries its best to mitigate that by having its usual advisor character pipe up and for the early missions to introduce some mechanics, but there’s still too much for players to discover on their own. The ever-popular tooltip exists for just about everything in the game and the help menu is incredibly comprehensive but they just aren’t enough. There needed to be a more directed tutorial for first time players. I can see some beginners possibly spending a dozen hours in a campaign before concluding that some of their earlier moves made things too difficult for them down the road. I like figuring out things for myself but there’s a fine line between that and having players flounder about. I think people not too sold on the concept might bounce off the game because of it at first. Persevering does reward players with a fun game. For all of the flaws I’ve mentioned in this review, it does so much more right. The action and tension paced steadily and the campaign feels competitive until its last stages. The setting is brought to life wonderfully and the heroic tendencies of the novel are translated into engaging gameplay. The character-based system isn’t as deep as, say, Crusader King II’s but it doesn’t have to be. It does a good job of creating enough context so that it doesn’t just feel like you’re painting the map via conquests all the time. It’s easy to recommend this game to both Total War fans and lovers of strategy titles. Despite it’s mixed accessibility, it’s also a good jumping in point for anyone as well. Three Kingdoms’ character and retinue system makes it easier to actually play competently and provides a good anchor point for the rest of the strategy that’s required. It sure doesn’t reinvent the wheel but this is an attractive and well-rounded game nonetheless. I look forward to seeing how Creative Assembly will build off its massive success. You can get Total War: Three Kingdoms through Feral’s webshop, the Humble Store or Steam.

Ubuntu To Provide Select 32-Bit Packages For Ubuntu 19.10 & 20.04 LTS

2019-06-24 17:25:53

It looks like my info from this weekend was accurate, "I'm hearing that Canonical may revert course and provide limited 32-bit support." Canonical issued a statement today that they indeed will provide "selected" 32-bit packages for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 as well as Ubuntu 20.04 LTS...

Canonical have released a statement on Ubuntu and 32bit support, will keep select packages

2019-06-24 17:16:42

Tags: MiscIt seems Canonical have done a bit of a U-turn on dropping 32bit support for Ubuntu, as many expected they would do. Their official statement is now out for those interested. The most important part to be aware of is their new plan: Thanks to the huge amount of feedback this weekend from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community, we will change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. We will put in place a community process to determine which 32-bit packages are needed to support legacy software, and can add to that list post-release if we miss something that is needed. That's not the end of it though of course, eventually 32bit will be dropped which is inevitable really. Just not fully this time. Touching on this, they said in the post about using "container technology" to address "the ultimate end of life of 32-bit libraries" so hopefully by that time everything they need will be in place to make it super easy for users. I'm glad Canonical have seen some sense on this, they clearly didn't communicate it well enough to begin with but they at least understand when they've made a big mistake like this and owning up to failures is part of what builds trust, so I'm happier now. Next time this happens, I just hope they give a very clear roadmap giving everyone proper time to prepare, which they didn't this time. Their full statement is here. It will be interesting to see how Valve react, after announcing an end of Ubuntu support for Steam for Ubuntu 19.10 onwards.

Raspberry Pi Used in JPL Breach

2019-06-24 17:00:00

NASA report shows exfiltration totaling more than 100 GB of information since 2009.

Benchmarking The Intel Performance Change With Linux FSGSBASE Support

2019-06-24 16:00:00

As covered last week, the Linux kernel is finally about to see FSGSBASE support a feature supported by Intel CPUs going back to Ivybridge and can help performance. Since that earlier article the FS/GS BASE patches have been moved to the x86/cpu branch meaning unless any last-minute problems arise the functionality will be merged for the Linux 5.3 cycle. I've also begun running some benchmarks to see how this will change the Linux performance on Intel hardware.

Hate speech on Twitter predicts frequency of real-life hate crimes

2019-06-24 15:57:34

According to a first-of-its-kind study, cities with a higher incidence of a certain kind of racist tweets reported more actual hate crimes related to race, ethnicity, and national origin.

Trump 5G push could hamper forecasting of deadly storms

2019-06-24 15:56:37

As atmospheric rivers dumped record volumes of rain on California this spring, emergency responders used the federal government's satellites to warn people about where the storms were likely to hit hardest.

BASIC CALCULATOR PROGRAM | LEARN BASH – PART 8

2019-06-24 15:53:08

We will build a simple calculator program using BASH scripting language and at the same time reinforce all the concepts already taught. In a quick summary, we’ve explored the fundamental topics on variables, decisions, control statements, and arguments. Then there were minor subtopics like using comments in bash programs and operator types.

SUSE: Release of SUSE CaaS Platform, SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 and More

2019-06-24 15:51:38

SUSE CaaS Platform 4.0 Beta 3 is out! SUSE CaaS Platform 4.0 is built on top of SLE 15 SP1 and requires either the JeOS version shipped from the product repositories or a regular SLE 15 SP1 installation. Please note that SLE 15 SP1 is now officially out! Check out the official announcement for more information. Thus you should not use a SLES 15 SP1 environment with the SLE Beta Registration Code anymore. Because the SLE Beta Registration Code has expired now, but you can either use your regular SLE Registration Code or use a Trial. SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Now Available With the current increase in data creation, increased costs and flat to lower budgets, IT organizations are looking for ways to deploy highly scalable and resilient storage solutions that manage data growth and complexity, reduce costs and seamlessly adapt to changing demands. Today we are pleased to announce the general availability of SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, the latest release of the award-winning SUSE software-defined storage solution designed to meet the demands of the data explosion. What’s New for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15 SP1 Happy Birthday! It’s been 1 year since we introduced the world’s first multimodal OS supporting 64-bit Arm systems (AArch64 architecture), SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15. Enterprise early adopters and developers of Ceph-based storage and industrial automation systems can gain faster time to market for innovative Arm-based server and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm is tested with a broad set of Arm System-on-a-Chip (SoC) processors, enabling enterprise-class security and greater reliability. And with your choice of Standard or Premium Support subscriptions you can get the latest security patches and fixes, and spend less time on problem resolution as compared to maintaining your own Linux distribution. Are you ready for the world’s first Multimodal Operating System Today, SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1, marking the one-year anniversary since we launched the world’s first multimodal OS. SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1 advances the multimodal OS model by enhancing the core tenets of common code base, modularity and community development while hardening business-critical attributes such as data security, reduced downtime and optimized workloads. The future of OpenStack? Before we can answer these questions, let’s take a look at its past to give some context. Since its original release in 2010 as a joint venture by Rackspace and NASA, and its subsequent spin-off into a separate open source foundation in 2012, OpenStack has seen growth and hype that was almost unparalleled. I was fortunate enough to attend the Paris OpenStack Summit in 2014, where Mark Collier was famously driven onto stage for a keynote in one of the BMW electric sports cars. The event was huge and was packed with attendees and sponsors – almost every large technology company you can think of was there. Marketing budget had clearly been splurged in a big way on this event with lots of pizazz and fancy swag to be had from the various vendor booths. Cycle forward 4 years to the next OpenStack Summit I attended – Vancouver in May 2018. This was a very different affair – most of the tech behemoths were no longer sponsoring, and while there were some nice pieces of swag for attendees to take home, it was clear that marketing budgets had been reduced as the hype had decreased. There were less attendees, less expensive giveaways, but that ever-present buzz of open source collaboration that has always been a part of OpenStack was still there. Users were still sharing their stories, and developers and engineers were sharing their learnings with each other, just on a slightly smaller scale. SUSE Academic Program to be present at 2019 UCISA SSG Conference Engaging with the community has always been important for SUSE and this is no different for our Academic Program. That is why next week, the SUSE Academic Program is excited to attend and participate in a three day event hosted by one of the most respected networks in UK education. read more

Glen Barber: Statement regarding employment change and roles in the [FreeBSD] Project

2019-06-24 15:35:09

Dear FreeBSD community: As I have a highly-visible role within the community, I want to share some news. I have decided the time has come to move on from my role with the FreeBSD Foundation, this Friday being my last day. I have accepted a position within a prominent company that uses and produces products based on FreeBSD. My new employer has included provisions within my job description that allow me to continue supporting the FreeBSD Project in my current roles, including Release Engineering. There are no planned immediate changes with how this pertains to my roles within the Project and the various teams of which I am a member. FreeBSD 11.3 and 12.1 will continue as previously scheduled, with no impact as a result of this change. I want to thank everyone at the FreeBSD Foundation for providing the opportunity to serve the FreeBSD Project in my various roles, and their support for my decision. I look forward to continue supporting the FreeBSD Project in my various roles moving forward. Glen Also: FreeBSD's Release Engineering Lead Departs The Foundation read more

Installing The Latest PHP on Ubuntu - Brandon Savage

2019-06-24 15:23:16

In the past I’ve written up installing various versions of PHP on new releases of Ubuntu, or for new releases of PHP. In those posts I’ve often recommended compiling PHP from scratch. However, compiling PHP from scratch is a serious chore, and keeping it up to date is even more of a serious responsibility. There […] The post Installing The Latest PHP on Ubuntu appeared first on BrandonSavage.net.

Raspberry Pi 4 on Sale Now, SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 Released, Instaclustr Service Broker Now Available, Steam for Linux to Drop Support for Ubuntu 19.10 and Beyond, and Linux 5.2-rc6 Is Out

2019-06-24 15:13:41

News briefs for June 24, 2019. Raspberry Pi 4 is on sale now, starting at $35. The Raspberry Pi blog post notes that "this is a comprehensive upgrade, touching almost every element of the platform. For the first time we provide a PC-like level of performance for most users, while retaining the interfacing capabilities and hackability of the classic Raspberry Pi line". This version also comes with different memory options (1GB for $35, 2GB for $45 or 4GB for $55). You can order one from approved resellers here. SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 on its one-year anniversary of launching the world's first multimodal OS. From the SUSE blog: "SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1 advances the multimodal OS model by enhancing the core tenets of common code base, modularity and community development while hardening business-critical attributes such as data security, reduced downtime and optimized workloads." Some highlights include faster and easier transition from community Linux to enterprise Linux, enhanced support for edge to HPC workloads and improved hardware-based security. Go here for release notes and download links. Instaclustr announces the availability of its Instaclustr Service Broker. This release "enables customers to easily integrate their containerized applications, or cloud native applications, with open source data-layer technologies provided by the Instaclustr Managed Platform—including Apache Cassandra and Apache Kafka. Doing so enables organizations—cloud native applications to leverage key capabilities of the Instaclustr platform such as automated service discovery, provisioning, management, and deprovisioning of data-layer clusters." Go here for more details. Valve developer announces that Steam for Linux will drop support for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release and future Ubuntu releases. Softpedia News reports that "Valve's harsh announcement comes just a few days after Canonical's announcement that they will drop support for 32-bit (i386) architectures in Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). Pierre-Loup Griffais said on Twitter that Steam for Linux won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10, nor any future releases. The Steam developer also added that Valve will focus their efforts on supporting other Linux-based operating systems for Steam for Linux. They will be looking for a GNU/Linux distribution that still offers support for 32-bit apps, and that they will try to minimize the breakage for Ubuntu users." Linux 5.2-rc6 was released on Saturday. Linus Torvalds writes, "rc6 is the biggest rc in number of commits we've had so far for this 5.2 cycle (obviously ignoring the merge window itself and rc1). And it's not just because of trivial patches (although admittedly we have those too), but we obviously had the TCP SACK/fragmentation/mss fixes in there, and they in turn required some fixes too." He also noted that he's "still reasonably optimistic that we're on track for a calm final part of the release, and I don't think there is anything particularly bad on the horizon." News Raspberry Pi SUSE Instaclustr Containers cloud native Valve Steam Ubuntu kernel

How To Configure a Galera Cluster with MariaDB on Ubuntu 18.04 Servers

2019-06-24 15:07:24

Goodvibes - internet radio player

2019-06-24 15:00:00

 Goodvibes is billed as a lightweight internet radio player offering a simple way to access your favorite radio stations.

Canonical Assures Users 32-bit Apps Will Run on Ubuntu 19.10 and Future - Updated

2019-06-24 15:00:00

Due to recent escalations, Canonical updated their view on the removal of support for the i386 (32-bit) architecture for Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases to assure users 32-bit apps will still run on the Linux-based operating system. Last week, Canonical announced that they will completely deprecate support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future Ubuntu Linux releases, starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system, due for release later this fall on October 17th. However, the company mentioned the fact that while 32-bit support is going away, there will still be ways to run 32-bit apps on a 64-bit OS. As Canonical didn't give more details on the matter at the time of the announcement, many users started complaining about how they will be able to run certain 32-bit apps and game...

Canonical Assures Users 32-bit Apps Will Run on Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

2019-06-24 15:00:00

Due to recent escalations, Canonical updated their view on the removal of support for the i386 (32-bit) architecture for Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases to assure users 32-bit apps will still run on the Linux-based operating system. Last week, Canonical announced that they will completely deprecate support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future Ubuntu Linux releases, starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system, due for release later this fall on October 17th. However, the company mentioned the fact that while 32-bit support is going away, there will still be ways to run 32-bit apps on a 64-bit OS. As Canonical didn't give more details on the matter at the time of the announcement, many users started complaining about how they will be able to run certain 32-bit apps and game...

One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop demostrated running Ubuntu

2019-06-24 14:34:46

If you are in interested in seeing how the Ubuntu Linux operating system runs on the new One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop. You are sure to be interested in the new video created by Brad Linder over at Liliputing. “ I posted some notes about what happened when I took Ubuntu 19.04 for a spin on the One Mix 3 Yoga in my first-look article, but plenty of folks who watched my first look video on YouTube asked for a video… so I made one of those too.” The creators of the One Mix Yoga 3 have made it fairly easy to boot an alternative operating system simply by plugging in a bootable flash drive or USB storage device. As the mini laptop is powering up simply hit the delete key and you will be presented by the BIOS/UEFI menu. Simply change the boot priority order so that the computer will boot from a USB device and you are in business. read more

The Raspberry Pi 4 is Here — And It’s a BEAST!

2019-06-24 14:33:23

The Raspberry Pi 4 has arrived, albeit far earlier than anyone (even Raspberry Pi themselves) expected. Sporting several major upgrades, the new Raspberry Pi 4 can claim to be the fastest and most versatile version […] This post, The Raspberry Pi 4 is Here — And It’s a BEAST!, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Security: Curl, Fedora, Windows and More

2019-06-24 14:31:05

Daniel Stenberg: openssl engine code injection in curl This flaw is known as CVE-2019-5443. If you downloaded and installed a curl executable for Windows from the curl project before June 21st 2019, go get an updated one. Now. Fedora's GRUB2 EFI Build To Offer Greater Security Options In addition to disabling root password-based SSH log-ins by default, another change being made to Fedora 31 in the name of greater security is adding some additional GRUB2 boot-loader modules to be built-in for their EFI boot-loader. GRUB2 security modules for verification, Cryptodisk, and LUKS will now be part of the default GRUB2 EFI build. They are being built-in now since those using the likes of UEFI SecureBoot aren't able to dynamically load these modules due to restrictions in place under SecureBoot. So until now using SecureBoot hasn't allowed users to enjoy encryption of the boot partition and the "verify" module with ensuring better integrity of the early boot-loader code. Fedora 31 Will Finally Disable OpenSSH Root Password-Based Logins By Default Fedora 31 will harden up its default configuration by finally disabling password-based OpenSSH root log-ins, matching the upstream default of the past four years and behavior generally enforced by other Linux distributions. The default OpenSSH daemon configuration file will now respect upstream's default of prohibiting passwords for root log-ins. Those wishing to restore the old behavior of allowing root log-ins with a password can adjust their SSHD configuration file with the PermitRootLogin option, but users are encouraged to instead use a public-key for root log-ins that is more secure and will be permitted still by default. Warning Issued For Millions Of Microsoft Windows 10 Users Picked up by Gizmodo, acclaimed Californian security company SafeBreach has revealed that software pre-installed on PCs has left “millions” of users exposed to hackers. Moreover, that estimate is conservative with the number realistically set to be hundreds of millions. The flaw lies in PC-Doctor Toolbox, systems analysis software which is rebadged and pre-installed on PCs made by some of the world’s biggest computer retailers, including Dell, its Alienware gaming brand, Staples and Corsair. Dell alone shipped almost 60M PCs last year and the company states PC-Doctor Toolbox (which it rebrands as part of ‘SupportAssist’) was pre-installed on “most” of them. What SafeBreach has discovered is a high-severity flaw which allows attackers to swap-out harmless DLL files loaded during Toolbox diagnostic scans with DLLs containing a malicious payload. The injection of this code impacts both Windows 10 business and home PCs and enables hackers to gain complete control of your computer. What makes it so dangerous is PC-makers give Toolbox high-permission level access to all your computer’s hardware and software so it can be monitored. The software can even give itself new, higher permission levels as it deems necessary. So once malicious code is injected via Toolbox, it can do just about anything to your PC. Update Your Dell Laptop Now to Fix a Critical Security Flaw in Pre-Installed Software SafeBreach Labs said it targeted SupportAssist, software pre-installed on most Dell PCs designed to check the health of the system’s hardware, based on the assumption that “such a critical service would have high permission level access to the PC hardware as well as the capability to induce privilege escalation.” What the researchers found is that the application loads DLL files from a folder accessible to users, meaning the files can be replaced and used to load and execute a malicious payload. There are concerns the flaw may affect non-Dell PCs, as well. The affected module within SupportAssist is a version of PC-Doctor Toolbox found in a number of other applications, including: Corsair ONE Diagnostics, Corsair Diagnostics, Staples EasyTech Diagnostics, Tobii I-Series Diagnostic Tool, and Tobii Dynavox Diagnostic Tool. The most effective way to prevent DLL hijacking is to quickly apply patches from the vendor. To fix this bug, either allow automatic updates to do its job, or download the latest version of Dell SupportAssist for Business PCs (x86 or x64) or Home PCs (here). You can read a full version of the SafeBreach Labs report here. TCP SACK PANIC Kernel Vulnerabilities Reported by Netflix Researchers On June 17th, Researchers at Netflix have identified several TCP networking vulnerabilities in FreeBSD and Linux kernels. DNS Security - Getting it Right This paper addresses the privacy implications of two new Domain Name System (DNS) encryption protocols: DNS-over-TLS (DoT) and DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH). Each of these protocols provides a means to secure the transfer of data during Internet domain name lookup, and they prevent monitoring and abuse of user data in this process. DoT and DoH provide valuable new protection for users online. They add protection to one of the last remaining unencrypted ‘core’ technologies of the modern Internet, strengthen resistance to censorship and can be coupled with additional protections to provide full user anonymity. Whilst DoT and DoH appear to be a win for Internet users, however, they raise issues for network operators concerned with Internet security and operational efficiency. DoH in particular makes it extremely difficult for network operators to implement domain-specific filters or blocks, which may have a negative impact on UK government strategies for the Internet which rely on these. We hope that a shift to encrypted DNS will lead to decreased reliance on network-level filtering for censorship. read more

Compiling OmniSciDB: CentOS 7 (GPU-Enabled)

2019-06-24 14:13:19

Road types in Reston, VA from Open Street Map (rendered by OmniSci Immerse) In my role as Senior Director of Developer Advocacy at OmniSci, one of my many responsibilities is to monitor our various ‘Help’ areas like GitHub issues and the Community message board. While speaking at conferences and contributing to open-source projects is valuable, answering user questions provides a rich understanding of what our product currently does, what our users would like OmniSci to do, and where our documentation could be better. In this post, I’ll demonstrate how to compile OmniSciDB (open-source) on CentOS 7 with GPU-support, and in future posts, I will demonstrate how to compile OmniSci on various other platforms for both CPU-only and GPU-enabled.

Drawpile 2.1.11 release

2019-06-24 14:05:40

Version 2.1.11 is now out. In addition to bug fixes, this release adds one long awaited feature: the ability to detach the chat box into a separate window. Another important change is to the server. IP bans now only apply to guest users. When a user with a registered account is banned, the ban is applied to the account only. This is to combat false positives caused by many unrelated people sharing the same IP address because of NAT. Also: Drawpile 2.1.11 Released! Allow to Detach Chat Box into Separate read more

Open-world space arcade-action game "Underspace" is on Kickstarter with a Linux demo

2019-06-24 14:02:32

Tags: Crowdfunding, Indie Game, Community, Action, Arcade, Open WorldOh goodie, more space action goodness! Underspace from Pastaspace Interactive is on Kickstarter looking for funding and it seems like quite a promising game. Underspace is about exploring an alien galaxy filled with vast interstellar wonders, and confronting the terrors that lay within them. It is an open-world space arcade dogfighting game, where every star system is crafted by hand, and every star system has something to see or do. But beware! Any star system you end up in is ruled by the storms. Watch video on YouTube.com What features it's planned to have: Open-world: Traverse where you want, how you want. Action-based: Fast fluid gameplay that emphasizes and rewards speed and aggression. Hand-crafted: Every star system was made by a real person, and each has delicious discoveries, context and history. Filled with unique content: There are over 70 star systems in Underspace, and every single one has unique wonders and challenges, be it a unique quest, a harrowing bossfight, or a revealing vignette. Singleplayer and multiplayer: Pursue the extensive main campaign on your own, or go online to tackle unique challenges with friends.  Yesterday, the developer put up a Linux demo which I've given a spin and it works great on Manjaro. It's a little confusing since the tutorials are basic pictures and text you flick-through but I liked the feel of it. It's rough but then it is an early demo and it's promising enough that I'm keen to see this one nicely polished. I like that it's not randomly generated too, so it will be interesting to see what kind of encounters they will be adding into it. They're not asking for a big sum, the campaign total is only $10K which is pretty low. This seems to be due to the game already having all the core features in place. They said their aim now is to just finish all the actual content for you to explore as some of it is a bit basic right now to show it off. Find the Kickstarter here, Linux demo here. Hat tip to iiari.

Panfrost Gallium3D Picks Up Yet More Features Thanks To Collabora's Summer Internship

2019-06-24 14:00:00

Just a few days ago I wrote how the Panfrost Gallium3D driver continues making incredible progress for this community-driven, open-source graphics driver targeting Arm Bifrost/Midgard graphics. There's yet another batch of new features and improvements to talk about...

Never Trust, Always Verify: Demystifying Zero Trust to Secure Your Networks

2019-06-24 14:00:00

The point of Zero Trust is not to make networks, clouds, or endpoints more trusted; it's to eliminate the concept of trust from digital systems altogether.

Official Raspberry Pi OS Updated with Raspberry Pi 4 Support, Based on Debian 10

2019-06-24 13:55:00

The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced today the release of a new version of the official operating system for the tiny Raspberry Pi single-board computers to support their latest Raspberry Pi 4 release. With the launch of the Raspberry Pi 4 SBC series, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released a new version of Raspbian OS, the official Raspberry Pi operating system based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux distribution. This release adds numerous new features and improvements, but the biggest change is that it supports the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B single-board computer. Another major change in the new Raspbian OS release is that the entire operating system has been rebased on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, due for release next month on July 6th. This means that there are numerous updated components inc...

Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Linux Action News, TechSNAP, GNU World Order, Linux in the Ham Shack, Python Podcast

2019-06-24 13:54:03

Going Linux #371 · Listener Feedback Bill continues his distro hopping. We discuss the history of Linux and a wall-mountable timeline. Troy gives feedback on Grub. Grubb give feedback on finding the right distribution. Highlander talks communication security and hidden files. Ro's Alienware computer won't boot. David provides liks to articles. Linux Action News 111 Ubuntu sets the Internet on fire, new Linux and FreeBSD vulnerabilities raise concern, while Mattermost raises $50M to compete with Slack. Plus we react to Facebook’s Libra confirmation and the end of Google tablets. SACK Attack | TechSNAP 406 A new vulnerability may be the next ‘Ping of Death’; we explore the details of SACK Panic and break down what you need to know. Plus Firefox zero days targeting Coinbase, the latest update on Rowhammer, and a few more reasons it’s a great time to be a ZFS user. GNU World Order 13x26 LHS Episode #289: Linux Deep Dive Hello and welcome to Episode #289 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, LHS gets a visit from Jon "maddog" Hall, a legend in the open source and Linux communities. He discusses--well--Linux. Everything you ever wanted to know about Linux from its early macro computing roots all the way up to the present. If there's something you didn't know about Linux, you're going to find it here. Make sure to listen to the outtake after the outro for 30 more minutes on Linux you problem didn't know anything about. Thanks to Jon for an illuminating and fascinating episode. Podcast.__init__: Behind The Scenes At The Python Software Foundation One of the secrets of the success of Python the language is the tireless efforts of the people who work with and for the Python Software Foundation. They have made it their mission to ensure the continued growth and success of the language and its community. In this episode Ewa Jodlowska, the executive director of the PSF, discusses the history of the foundation, the services and support that they provide to the community and language, and how you can help them succeed in their mission. read more

Linux Package Managers Compared – AppImage vs Snap vs Flatpak

2019-06-24 13:40:56

Package managers provide a way of packaging, distributing, installing, and maintaining apps in an operating system. With modern desktop, server and IoT applications of the Linux operating system and the hundreds of different distros that exist, it becomes necessary to move away from platform specific packaging methods to platform agnostic ones. This post explores 3 such tools, namely AppImage, Snap and Flatpak, that each aim to be the future of software deployment and management in Linux. At the end we summarize a few key findings. read more

Games on GNU/Linux: Latest News and Titles

2019-06-24 13:24:55

Epic's Tim Sweeney thinks Wine "is the one hope for breaking the cycle", Easy Anti-Cheat continuing Linux support This is as a result of this article on Wccftech, which highlights a number of other interesting statements made by Sweeney recently. The funny this is, Valve themselves are helping to improve Wine (which Sweeney touches on below) with Steam Play (which is all open source remember) and a lot of the changes make it back into vanilla Wine. Insurgency: Sandstorm for Linux not due until next year, with a beta likely first We're in for a sadly longer wait than expected for the first-person shooter Insurgency: Sandstorm [Steam], as it's not coming until next year for Linux. On a recent Twitch broadcast during the free weekend, it was asked in their chat "Linux will be released along with consoles or after?" to which the Lead Game Designer, Michael Tsarouhas said (here) "We haven't really announced our Linux or Mac release either, but we will just have to update you later, right now we can say we are focused on the PC post-release content and the console releases.". Tense Reflection sounds like pretty original take on combining a shooter with a puzzle game Tense Reflection will ask you to think, solve and shoot as you need to solve puzzles to reload your ammo making it a rather unique hybrid of game genres. Developed by Kommie since sometime in 2016, the gameplay is split across three different panels you will need to switch between. A colour panel to pick the colour of your shots, the puzzle panel you need to solve to apply the colour and then the shooter to keep it all going. The survival game 'SCUM' seems to still be coming to Linux, no date yet though SCUM, a survival game from Gamepires, Croteam and Devolver Digital that was previously confirmed to eventually come to Linux is still planned. They never gave a date for the Linux release and they still aren't, but the good news is that it still seems to be in their minds. Writing on Steam, a developer kept it short and sweet by saying "Its not to far" in reply to my comment about hoping the Linux version isn't far off. Not exactly much to go by, but it's fantastic to know it's coming as I love survival games like this. In the real-time strategy game "Moduwar" you control and change an alien organism I absolutely love real-time strategy games, so Moduwar was quite a catch to find. It seems rather unique too, especially how you control everything. Instead of building a traditional base and units, you control an alien organism that can split and change depending on what you need to do. It sounds seriously brilliant! Even better, is that it will support Linux. I asked on the Steam forum after finding it using the Steam Discovery Queue, to which the developer replied with "Yes, there will be a Linux version, that's the plan. Thanks :)". read more

Phones and wearables combine to assess worker performance

2019-06-24 13:00:50

Using smartphones, fitness bracelets and a custom app, researchers have created a mobile-sensing system that judges employee performance.

Tense Reflection sounds like pretty original take on combining a shooter with a puzzle game

2019-06-24 12:49:44

Tags: Steam, Indie Game, Upcoming, Puzzle, ActionTense Reflection will ask you to think, solve and shoot as you need to solve puzzles to reload your ammo making it a rather unique hybrid of game genres. Developed by Kommie since sometime in 2016, the gameplay is split across three different panels you will need to switch between. A colour panel to pick the colour of your shots, the puzzle panel you need to solve to apply the colour and then the shooter to keep it all going. Watch video on YouTube.com Love the idea, looks like it will keep you on your toes. Hopefully the panel switching isn't too confusing, although it looks simple enough from the trailer. What's also nice, is that it will include a level editor with Steam Workshop support so I've no doubt players will come up with some pretty fun extras for it. The release is due sometime this "Summer" according to Steam but their press info says August, will keep you posted on the exact date. You can follow/wishlist it on Steam.

The survival game 'SCUM' seems to still be coming to Linux, no date yet though

2019-06-24 12:30:49

Tags: Survival, Steam, Upcoming, Early AccessSCUM, a survival game from Gamepires, Croteam and Devolver Digital that was previously confirmed to eventually come to Linux is still planned. They never gave a date for the Linux release and they still aren't, but the good news is that it still seems to be in their minds. Writing on Steam, a developer kept it short and sweet by saying "Its not to far" in reply to my comment about hoping the Linux version isn't far off. Not exactly much to go by, but it's fantastic to know it's coming as I love survival games like this. Watch video on YouTube.com It seems very different to games like Rust and 7 Days to Die, with a heavy emphasis on character customization, control and progression. Apart from the usual survival mode, it also includes traditional gameplay modes like Deathmatch, Team Deathmatch along with NPCs to come across, “realistic” bullet physics, animal tracking and hunting, vehicles and more. It’s currently in Early Access and there’s plenty of reviews talking about the roughness of it, but there’s plenty of others that see a lot of promise in it. Either way, I shall take a look when Linux support is out. You can follow/wishlist SCUM on Steam.

How to Cool Your Raspberry Pi

2019-06-24 12:10:08

If you're overclocking your Raspberry Pi, you might run into overheating problems. Fortunately, you can prevent this by adding sufficient cooling to your Pi

Linux productivity: Why it's needed and the top 10 apps

2019-06-24 12:00:00

In this article, we will cover why increasing productivity on your Linux machine is important, along with the Top 10 apps to do so.

Out of Steam? Wine draining away? Ubuntu's 64-bit-only x86 decision is causing migraines

2019-06-24 11:50:07

i386 binaries will still run, says Canonical, but it may not be good enough for key apps Updated  Canonical's decision to effectively ditch official support for 32-bit x86 in Ubuntu 19.10, codenamed Eoan, means the Steam gaming runtime is likely to run aground on the Linux operating system – and devs say the Wine compatibility layer for running Windows apps will be of little use.…

Out of Steam, Wine draining away? Ubuntu's 64-bit only decision is causing problems

2019-06-24 11:50:07

32-bit binaries will still run, insists Canonical, but it may not be good enough for key apps Canonical's decision to cease development of 32-bit libraries in Ubuntu 19.10 "eoan" means it won't support Steam gaming runtime and devs say the Wine compatibility layer for running Windows apps will be little use.…

Out of Steam or Wine draining away? Ubuntu's 64-bit-only x86 decision is causing migraines

2019-06-24 11:50:07

i386 binaries will still run, says Canonical, but it may not be good enough for key apps Updated  Canonical's decision to effectively ditch official support for 32-bit x86 in Ubuntu 19.10, codenamed Eoan, means the Steam gaming runtime is likely to run aground on the Linux operating system – and devs say the Wine compatibility layer for running Windows apps will be of little use.…

Old Linus Torvalds is back: Linux page caching sparks 'bulls**t' outburst

2019-06-24 11:45:47

The real Linus Torvalds stands up.

Python's Mypy--Advanced Usage

2019-06-24 11:30:00

by Reuven M. Lerner Mypy can check more than simple Python types. In my last article, I introduced Mypy, a package that enforces type checking in Python programs. Python itself is, and always will remain, a dynamically typed language. However, Python 3 supports "annotations", a feature that allows you to attach an object to variables, function parameters and function return values. These annotations are ignored by Python itself, but they can be used by external tools. Mypy is one such tool, and it's an increasingly popular one. The idea is that you run Mypy on your code before running it. Mypy looks at your code and makes sure that your annotations correspond with actual usage. In that sense, it's far stricter than Python itself, but that's the whole point. In my last article, I covered some basic uses for Mypy. Here, I want to expand upon those basics and show how Mypy really digs deeply into type definitions, allowing you to describe your code in a way that lets you be more confident of its stability. Type Inference Consider the following code: x: int = 5 x = 'abc' print(x) This first defines the variable x, giving it a type annotation of int. It also assigns it to the integer 5. On the next line, it assigns x the string abc. And on the third line, it prints the value of x. The Python language itself has no problems with the above code. But if you run mypy against it, you'll get an error message: mytest.py:5: error: Incompatible types in assignment (expression has type "str", variable has type "int") As the message says, the code declared the variable to have type int, but then assigned a string to it. Mypy can figure this out because, despite what many people believe, Python is a strongly typed language. That is, every object has one clearly defined type. Mypy notices this and then warns that the code is assigning values that are contrary to what the declarations said. In the above code, you can see that I declared x to be of type int at definition time, but then assigned it to a string, and then I got an error. What if I don't add the annotation at all? That is, what if I run the following code via Mypy: Go to Full Article

Teaching robots what humans want

2019-06-24 11:10:02

Told to optimize for speed while racing down a track in a computer game, a car pushes the pedal to the metal … and proceeds to spin in a tight little circle. Nothing in the instructions told the car to drive straight, and so it improvised.

In the real-time strategy game "Moduwar" you control and change an alien organism

2019-06-24 11:08:57

Tags: RTS, Steam, Indie Game, UpcomingI absolutely love real-time strategy games, so Moduwar was quite a catch to find. It seems rather unique too, especially how you control everything. Instead of building a traditional base and units, you control an alien organism that can split and change depending on what you need to do. It sounds seriously brilliant! Even better, is that it will support Linux. I asked on the Steam forum after finding it using the Steam Discovery Queue, to which the developer replied with "Yes, there will be a Linux version, that's the plan. Thanks :)". Just look at how delightfully freaky and weird it is: Watch video on YouTube.com It's going to start off in Early Access, which the developer Biohex Games said should last for 6-12 months. Could be very interesting to play such a strategy game online against others. Planned features: Customizable Units: Grow your Modu, a base-unit that can split and reassemble, depending on your strategic needs and personal preferences. Explore Arkadia, a magnificent planet full of alien flora and fauna. Learn more about the Modu in a Single-Player story driven campaign, or play against your friends in Multiplayer mode. Grow weaponized organs or biological power-ups, to unlock dozens of unique combinations. Check it out and wishlist/follow on Steam, due out in "Q4" this year.

Linux Paste Command - Sequential Merging of Multiple Files

2019-06-24 10:55:48

Learn how to sequentially merge two or more files on the Linux command line. We explain all of the paste commands features and show examples of each.

Vulkan 1.1.112 Released While Open-Source ANV + RADV Drivers Continue Marching Along

2019-06-24 10:32:57

Vulkan 1.1.112 was outed this morning as the newest documentation update to this high performance graphics and compute API...

Raspberry Pi 4 announced and available - sounds like a pretty nice upgrade, Raspbian now based on Debian 10

2019-06-24 10:10:14

Tags: HardwareNot something we usually cover here, but it's a fun bit of hardware news. The Raspberry Pi 4 is now official and it's out and ready to pick up. Interestingly, they also overhauled their home-grown Raspbian Linux OS, as it's now based on Debian 10 Buster. To go along with this, their original graphics stack is being retired in favour of using the Mesa "V3D" driver developed by Eric Anholt at Broadcom. They say it has allowed them to remove "roughly half of the lines of closed-source code in the platform" which is a nice win. Here's the breakdown of the hardware: A 1.5GHz quad-core 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU (~3× performance) 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB of LPDDR4 SDRAM Full-throughput Gigabit Ethernet Dual-band 802.11ac wireless networking Bluetooth 5.0 Two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports Dual monitor support, at resolutions up to 4K VideoCore VI graphics, supporting OpenGL ES 3.x 4Kp60 hardware decode of HEVC video Complete compatibility with earlier Raspberry Pi products You can see their quick announcement video below: Watch video on YouTube.com The price still sounds great too, especially now with different RAM options (price may be slightly different in various shops stocking them): 1GB - $35/£34 2GB - $45/£44 4GB - $55/£54 For those who love to tinker, it really sounds like a great little unit. I've still never picked one up but I've always wanted one to play with. Sounds like my wait was worth it, might have to set one up as a little media centre of some sort. The additional performance should be quite interesting for gaming too, could also make a good streaming unit with the Steam Link App for Raspberry Pi. You can read their full announcement here.

Raspberry Pi 4 Announced With Dual HDMI, USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, V3D Driver Stack

2019-06-24 09:56:59

Managing to make it out today as a surprise is the Raspberry Pi 4. The Raspberry Pi 4 is a major overhaul and their most radical update yet while base pricing still starts out at $35 USD...

Official x86 Zhaoxin Processor Support Is Coming With Linux 5.3

2019-06-24 09:52:07

Zhaoxin is the company producing Chinese x86 CPUs created by a joint venture between VIA and the Shanghai government. The current Zhaoxin ZX CPUs are based on VIA's Isiah design and making use of VIA's x86 license. With the Linux 5.3 kernel will be better support for these Chinese desktop x86 CPUs...

Trulifi leveraging light waves for send-receive of office data

2019-06-24 09:50:01

Some companies need your time when they explain properly what their technology is all about and in turn brochures, white papers and video talks are in order. Signify is lucky. Two words wrap it up for them. Light connects.

How to Install and Configure an NFS Server on Ubuntu 18.04

2019-06-24 09:41:28

Network File System (NFS) is a distributed file system protocol that allows you to share remote directories over a network. With NFS, you can mount remote directories on your system and work with files on a remote machine as if they were local files.

Epic's Tim Sweeney thinks Wine "is the one hope for breaking the cycle", Easy Ant-Cheat continuing Linux support

2019-06-24 09:39:34

Tags: Epic Games, Editorial, WineHere's something interesting, Tim Sweeney, the founder and CEO of Epic Games has been chatting on Twitter again and what he said is quite interesting. In reply to a user on Twitter who said about users not liking change, Sweeney said this: Actually I think WINE is the one hope for breaking the cycle. If most PC games were automatically compatible with Linux, it would greatly increase the viability of Linux as a consumer platform. This is as a result of this article on Wccftech, which highlights a number of other interesting statements made by Sweeney recently. The funny this is, Valve themselves are helping to improve Wine (which Sweeney touches on below) with Steam Play (which is all open source remember) and a lot of the changes make it back into vanilla Wine. Another very interesting statement for Linux gamers, was a mention of Easy Ant-Cheat: No, that was a misleading article. The Easy Anti Cheat team is continuing to work on Linux support. Native support is in a beta state and works for some games, however we’re quite a ways from the ideal of a WINE/Proton solution for emulated games. Note: Not sure what article he is referring to, as he didn't link to any. Easy Ant-Cheat support in Wine really would be quite something, it would overnight make a huge amount more games work on Linux so fingers crossed something actually comes out of it. What I get from all this, is that Sweeney does seem to be keeping a close eye on Steam Play/Proton and Wine, to the point of even replying on Twitter about the Ubuntu situation: The problem isn’t Steam 64-bit support - Valve is working prodigiously to advance Linux and Proton - the problem is that Ubuntu dropping 32-bit support breaks all 32-bit Linux and Wine/win32 games, which comprise a huge fraction of the legacy game library. There's a lot of other things Sweeney talked about recently too, naturally exclusive games being a hot topic and something Sweeney certainly doesn't shy away from. Here's one such statement that actually did genuinely make me stop and think for brief moment: I’d like to challenge critics to state what moral principle you feel is at stake. If it’s okay for one company to avoid the 30% Valve tax by selling exclusively through their own store, why is it wrong for multiple companies to work together to achieve the same goals? Let's take Feral Interactive as an example of this, I've seen a lot of comments from people saying they buy directly through the Feral store, so Feral gets the full cut and that's just one of many such examples. However, the difference of course is the majority of the time the games are available across multiple stores, you still have the choice. I'm personally torn on it all. I don't particularly like exclusives, as I don't like any kind of lock-in but I don't blame developers for doing it. Good games take a lot of time and money to produce and support after release. Offering developers the chance to earn more money from a smaller store cut, plus limited-time exclusive funds to help them finish their game and improve it, developers are obviously going to take it. It's just a huge shame for Linux users, since the Epic Store is not available on Linux and it sounds like they still have no plans to change that any time soon. There's been a few times a game was announced with Linux support, to then later became an Epic Store exclusive which means they won't even be doing a Linux version until the exclusive time is over. For us, that really sucks and it's part of the reason I don't like it. I do hope all of that changes eventually but I am glad that Sweeney seems to be quite positive about things like Wine and possible EAC support in future.

Epic's Tim Sweeney thinks Wine "is the one hope for breaking the cycle", Easy Anti-Cheat continuing Linux support

2019-06-24 09:39:34

Tags: Epic Games, Editorial, WineHere's something interesting, Tim Sweeney, the founder and CEO of Epic Games has been chatting on Twitter again and what he said is quite interesting. In reply to a user on Twitter who said about users not liking change, Sweeney said this: Actually I think WINE is the one hope for breaking the cycle. If most PC games were automatically compatible with Linux, it would greatly increase the viability of Linux as a consumer platform. This is as a result of this article on Wccftech, which highlights a number of other interesting statements made by Sweeney recently. The funny this is, Valve themselves are helping to improve Wine (which Sweeney touches on below) with Steam Play (which is all open source remember) and a lot of the changes make it back into vanilla Wine. Another very interesting statement for Linux gamers, was a mention of Easy Anti-Cheat: No, that was a misleading article. The Easy Anti Cheat team is continuing to work on Linux support. Native support is in a beta state and works for some games, however we’re quite a ways from the ideal of a WINE/Proton solution for emulated games. Note: Not sure what article he is referring to, as he didn't link to any. Easy Ant-Cheat support in Wine really would be quite something, it would overnight make a huge amount more games work on Linux so fingers crossed something actually comes out of it. What I get from all this, is that Sweeney does seem to be keeping a close eye on Steam Play/Proton and Wine, to the point of even replying on Twitter about the Ubuntu situation: The problem isn’t Steam 64-bit support - Valve is working prodigiously to advance Linux and Proton - the problem is that Ubuntu dropping 32-bit support breaks all 32-bit Linux and Wine/win32 games, which comprise a huge fraction of the legacy game library. There's a lot of other things Sweeney talked about recently too, naturally exclusive games being a hot topic and something Sweeney certainly doesn't shy away from. Here's one such statement that actually did genuinely make me stop and think for brief moment: I’d like to challenge critics to state what moral principle you feel is at stake. If it’s okay for one company to avoid the 30% Valve tax by selling exclusively through their own store, why is it wrong for multiple companies to work together to achieve the same goals? Let's take Feral Interactive as an example of this, I've seen a lot of comments from people saying they buy directly through the Feral store, so Feral gets the full cut and that's just one of many such examples. However, the difference of course is the majority of the time the games are available across multiple stores, you still have the choice. I'm personally torn on it all. I don't particularly like exclusives, as I don't like any kind of lock-in but I don't blame developers for doing it. Good games take a lot of time and money to produce and support after release. Offering developers the chance to earn more money from a smaller store cut, plus limited-time exclusive funds to help them finish their game and improve it, developers are obviously going to take it. It's just a huge shame for Linux users, since the Epic Store is not available on Linux and it sounds like they still have no plans to change that any time soon. There's been a few times a game was announced with Linux support, to then later became an Epic Store exclusive which means they won't even be doing a Linux version until the exclusive time is over. For us, that really sucks and it's part of the reason I don't like it. I do hope all of that changes eventually but I am glad that Sweeney seems to be quite positive about things like Wine and possible EAC support in future.

Distribution Release: Raspbian 2019-06-20

2019-06-24 09:33:29

Eben Upton has announced the release of a major new version of Raspbian, a Debian-based distribution for the Raspberry Pi single-board computers. The updated build, version 2019-06-20, is the first image based on the upcoming release of Debian 10 "Buster". Information about the new Raspbian was provided as....

Insurgency: Sandstorm for Linux not due until next year, with a beta likely first

2019-06-24 09:07:38

Tags: FPS, Steam, UpcomingWe're in for a sadly longer wait than expected for the first-person shooter Insurgency: Sandstorm [Steam], as it's not coming until next year for Linux. On a recent Twitch broadcast during the free weekend, it was asked in their chat "Linux will be released along with consoles or after?" to which the Lead Game Designer, Michael Tsarouhas said (here) "We haven't really announced our Linux or Mac release either, but we will just have to update you later, right now we can say we are focused on the PC post-release content and the console releases.". After which, the Founder & CEO Jemery Blum, also jumped in to say "I think for Linux and Mac it would be fair to say sometime next year is the likely window for that, it may start out first as sort-of like a beta, we won't necessarily announce that we support Linux and Mac on the store page immediately but we will roll out a Linux and Mac build and announce that to the community, it may not be fully stable and fully polished yet but to us the way that we develop and the size of our team, that really seems like the best way to go about getting our way to a Linux and Mac release". So it's very much still coming, but it won't be until next year and it will get a beta version first. I don't blame them for focusing on the larger markets but it's quite a long wait now, since it was released in December last year. Hopefully when we get it, the gameplay will be nicely polished. Hat tip to Jolltz.

Raspberry PI 4 Released – Complete specs and pricing

2019-06-24 08:49:11

How to Install Ruby 2.6 & Rails 6 on Ubuntu 19.04

2019-06-24 08:27:08

In this tutorial, we'll see how we can install the latest version of Ruby v2.6 on Ubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo. and next we'll see how to set up a development environment for Ruby on Rails 6.

Review: Clear Linux and Guix System 1.0.1

2019-06-24 07:32:27

Clear Linux is a rolling release distro that places a strong emphasis on performance. The distribution focuses on providing optimizations for Intel (and compatible) CPU platforms and often scores well in benchmark tests. I previously experimented briefly with Clear Linux in 2017 and found it to be very minimal in its features. The distribution presented users with a command line interface by default and, while it was possible to install a desktop environment from the project's repositories, it was not focused on desktop computing. These days Clear Linux is available in several editions. There are separate builds for command line and desktop editions, along with cloud and specially tailored virtual machine builds. I downloaded the distribution's live desktop edition which was a 2.2GB compressed file. Expanding the download unpacks a 2.3GB ISO. It actually took longer for me to decompress the file than it would have to download the extra 100MB so the compression used on the archive is probably not practical. Trying to boot from the live desktop media quickly resulted in Clear Linux running into a kernel panic and refusing to start. This was done trying version 29410 of the distribution and, since new versions come along almost every day, I waited a while and then downloaded another version: Clear Linux 29590. The new version had an ISO approximately the same size and, after it passed its checksum, it too failed to boot due to a kernel panic. I have used Clear Linux on this system before and, though it technically utilizes an AMD CPU, that was not an issue during my previous trial. The current situation does make me wonder if Clear Linux might have optimized itself so much that it is no longer capable of running on previous generation processors. read more

Horde vs Roundcube vs Squirrelmail - Which Works Best

2019-06-24 07:19:03

Webmail is a great way to access your emails from different devices and when you are away from your home. Now, most web hosting companies include email with their server plans. And all of them offer the same three, webmail clients as well: RoundCube, Horde, and SquirrelMail. They are part of the cPanel - most popular hosting control panel. read more

Cyprus racers show budget solar cars have a sunny future

2019-06-24 07:14:17

Venetia Chrysostomide fastened her helmet and rolled her solar-powered car into the sunny streets of Cypriot capital Nicosia for a race to showcase such vehicles' eco-friendly potential, even on a budget.

Check your password security with Have I Been Pwned? and pass

2019-06-24 07:01:00

Password security involves a broad set of practices, and not all of them are appropriate or possible for everyone. Therefore, the best strategy is to develop a threat model by thinking through your most significant risks—who and what you are protecting against—then model your security approach on the activities that are most effective against those specific threats. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has a great series on threat modeling that I encourage everyone to read. read more

What are you working on this summer?

2019-06-24 07:00:00

Do you have a summer goal? Do longer days allow you to finally carve out time to work on a certain passion project? Will you be spending time AFK (away from keyboard) to enjoy no-code hobbies or volunteer? Are you traveling to any conferences or taking a family vacation? If you're still looking for inspiration, read what our writers had to say: "Getting some sleep. :-)" —Mike Bursell "Learning Python and coming up with cool ways I can use it to support ChickTech Austin." —Nicole Baratta "Finishing up an electric motorcycle conversion." —DJ Delorie read more

Fedora's GRUB2 EFI Build To Offer Greater Security Options

2019-06-24 06:35:35

In addition to disabling root password-based SSH log-ins by default, another change being made to Fedora 31 in the name of greater security is adding some additional GRUB2 boot-loader modules to be built-in for their EFI boot-loader...

Open Data, Open Access and Open Hardware

2019-06-24 06:20:25

DoD’s Joint AI Center to open-source natural disaster satellite imagery data set As climate change escalates, the impact of natural disasters is likely to become less predictable. To encourage the use of machine learning for building damage assessment this week, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute and CrowdAI — the U.S. Department of Defense’s Joint AI Center (JAIC) and Defense Innovation Unit — open-sourced a labeled data set of some of the largest natural disasters in the past decade. Called xBD, it covers the impact of disasters around the globe, like the 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. “Although large-scale disasters bring catastrophic damage, they are relatively infrequent, so the availability of relevant satellite imagery is low. Furthermore, building design differs depending on where a structure is located in the world. As a result, damage of the same severity can look different from place to place, and data must exist to reflect this phenomenon,” reads a research paper detailing the creation of xBD. [...] xBD includes approximately 700,000 satellite images of buildings before and after eight different kinds of natural disasters, including earthquakes, wildfires, floods, and volcanic eruptions. Covering about 5,000 square kilometers, it contains images of floods in India and Africa, dam collapses in Laos and Brazil, and historic deadly fires in California and Greece. The data set will be made available in the coming weeks alongside the xView 2.0 Challenge to unearth additional insights from xBD, coauthor and CrowdAI machine learning lead Jigar Doshi told VentureBeat. The data set collection effort was informed by the California Air National Guard’s approach to damage assessment from wildfires. Open-source textbooks offer free alternative for UC Clermont students Some UC Clermont College students are avoiding paying hundreds of dollars for textbooks — and getting the content for free — thanks to online open-source textbooks, a growing trend among faculty at the college and throughout higher education. UC Clermont Dean Jeff Bauer, who is also a professor of business, said the benefits of open textbooks are many. “All students have the book on the first day of class, it saves them a lot of money, and the information can be accessed anywhere, anytime, without carrying around a heavy textbook,” Bauer said. “They don’t need to visit the bookstore before or after each semester to buy or sell back books, either.” Open Source Computer Controlled Loom Knits Pikachu For You The origin story of software takes us back past punch card computers and Babbage's Difference Engine to a French weaver called Joseph Marie Jacquard. Successful open-source RISC-V microcontroller launched through crowdfunding X-FAB Silicon Foundries, together with crowd-sourcing IC platform partner Efabless Corporation, launched the first-silicon availability of the Efabless RISC-V SoC reference design. This open-source semiconductor project went from start of design to tape-out in less than three months employing the Efabless design flow produced on open-source tools. The mixed-signal SoC, called Raven, is based on the community developed ultra-low power PicoRV32 RISC-V core. Efabless has bench-tested the Raven at 100MHz, and based on simulations, the solution should operate at up to 150MHz. Open Hardware: Open-Source MRI Scanners Could Bring Enormous Cost Savings Wulfsberg explore the possibilities of open source MRI scanning. As open-source technology takes its place around the world—everywhere from makerspaces to FabLabs, users on every level have access to design and innovation. In allowing such access to MRI scanning, the researchers realize the potential for ‘technological literacy’ globally—and with MRIs specifically, astronomical sums could be saved in healthcare costs. The authors point out that medical technology is vital to the population of the world for treating not only conditions and illnesses, but also disabilities. As so many others deeply involved in the world of technology and 3D printing realize, with greater availability, accessibility, and affordability, huge strides can be made to improve and save lives. Today, with so many MRI patents expiring, the technology is open for commercialization. read more

Security: Password Managers, 'Cyber Militia', Linux Kernel "LOCKDOWN" and IPFire 2.23

2019-06-24 06:16:41

Open source vs proprietary password managers [Ed: If it's proprietary software, then you can never trust what it's doing with all your passwords; it can compromise everything you have. Like putting a bandit in charge of guarding a neighbourhood] Nowadays, we all have huge numbers of subscriptions to online accounts and services. For those accounts to be secure, each one of them must have a unique, robust password. What’s more, truly strong passwords must be complicated, which means that they are extremely difficult to remember. Cyber Militia Launches Non-Profit to Share Technology [Ed: The NSA uses the term "Cyber Militia"; what a bunch of thugs. RockNSM is a network security monitoring platform that uses open source technologies, such as CentOS, which is an operating system derived from the RedHat enterprise-level open source system. RockNSM formed the basis for a Task Force Echo network anomaly detection system used for real-world cyber operations. Linux Kernel "LOCKDOWN" Ported To Being An LSM, Still Undergoing Review It didn't make it for the Linux 5.2 kernel and now it's up to its 33rd revision on the Linux kernel mailing list... The "lockdown" patches for locking down access to various kernel hardware features has been reworked now and is a Linux Security Module (LSM) as it still tries to get enough endorsements to be mainlined. The Lockdown effort has been most recently led by Google's Matthew Garrett and with this 33rd revision he reworked the code to serve as an LSM module. The Lockdown functionality prohibits writing to /dev/mem, restricts PCI BAR and CPU MSR access, doesn't allow kernel module parameters that touch hardware settings, drops system hibernation support, and disables other functionality that could potentially change the hardware state or running Linux kernel image. IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 133 has been released This update brings many updates on the core libraries of the system. Various changes to our build system are also helping us to build a more modern distribution, faster. The toolchain is now based on GCC 8.3.0, binutils 2.32 and glibc 2.29 which bring various bugfixes, performance improvements and some new features. Although these might not be the most exciting changes, we recommend upgrading as soon as possible since this is essential hardening for backbone components of the user-space. read more

Raspberry Pi 4 is here!

2019-06-24 06:00:00

The latest version of the Raspberry Pi—Raspberry Pi 4—was released today, earlier than anticipated, featuring a new 1.5GHz Arm chip and VideoCore GPU with some brand new additions: dual-HDMI 4K display output; USB3 ports; Gigabit Ethernet; and multiple RAM options up to 4GB. read more

Cloudflares random number generator, robotics data visualization, npm token scanning, and more news

2019-06-24 05:52:45

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look Cloudflare[he]#039[/he]s open source random number generator, more open source robotics data, new npm functionality, and more!

FreeBSD's Release Engineering Lead Departs The Foundation

2019-06-24 04:27:36

Well known FreeBSD developer and leader of their release engineering team, Glen Barber, has left the FreeBSD Foundation but will continue working on FreeBSD as well as coordinating its releases...

Valve Says Steam for Linux Won't Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

2019-06-24 03:36:00

Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais working on Steam for Linux announced that they will drop support for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release, as well as future Ubuntu Linux releases. Valve's harsh announcement comes just a few days after Canonical's announcement that they will drop support for 32-bit (i386) architectures in Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). Pierre-Loup Griffais said on Twitter that Steam for Linux won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10, nor any future releases. The Steam developer also added that Valve will focus their efforts on supporting other Linux-based operating systems for Steam for Linux. They will be looking for a GNU/Linux distribution that still offers support for 32-bit apps, and that they will try to minimize the breakage for Ubuntu users. "Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not ...

Nordic Theme on Ubuntu Desktop GNOME 3

2019-06-24 03:29:15

Nordic is currently ranked #10 most popular GTK3 theme on OpenDesktop.org. This article exposes this theme beauty and explains how to install every component on Ubuntu 18.04. You can practice the installation procedures on other distros as long as it uses GNOME 3 as the user interface. read more

How to Install and Configure KVM on RHEL 8

2019-06-24 03:28:22

KVM is an open source virtualization technology which converts your Linux machine into a type-1 bare-metal hypervisor that allows you to run multiple virtual machines (VMs) or guest VMs KVM stands for Kernel based...

GNU APL 1.8 Released

2019-06-24 03:16:16

I am happy to announce that GNU APL 1.8 has been released. GNU APL is a free implementation of the ISO standard 13751 aka. "Programming Language APL, Extended", read more

KDE: Usability & Productivity, Skrooge 2.20.0, New Site for Konsole and GSoC

2019-06-24 03:13:40

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 76 Week 76 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative is here! This week’s progress report includes the first several says of the Usability & Productivity sprint, and as such, it’s absolutely overflowing with cool stuff! KDE's Night Color Feature Being Ported From Wayland To X11 It's another busy summer in the KDE space with a nice mixture of bug fixes and features being pursued for KDE Frameworks, KDE Plasma, and KDE Applications. One new feature coming is a back-porting of their night color feature from Wayland to X11. KDE, like many other desktops these days, has offered a "night color" option that adjusts the gamma ramp for the display output. This feature has just been supported on Wayland given that's their focus moving forward, but with no major blockers in supporting the feature on X11, that is now being addressed. This X11 support for the night color feature is coming for Plasma 5.17. Skrooge 2.20.0 released The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.20.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks. New website for Konsole The content could probably still need some improvements, so if you find typos or want to improve the wording of a sentence, please get in touch with KDE Promo. The good news is that you don’t need to be a programmer for this. [...] The new website uses Jekyll to render static html. Because the layout and the design aren’t unique to konsole.kde.org, I created a special Jekyll located at invent.kde.org/websites/jekyll-kde-theme, so that only the content and some configuration files are located in the websites/konsole-kde-org repository. This make it easier to maintain and will make it easier to change others website in the future without repeating ourself. This was a bit harder to deploy than I first though, I had problem with installing my Jekyll theme in the docker image, but after the third or fourth try, it worked and then I had an encoding issue, that wasn’t present on my development machine. Crazy Last Weeks Last weeks have been crazy for me. Since the GSoC began, I have been rushing everything related to university and my life to dedicate exclusively to the development. Besides the two classes I was taking, Static Code Analysis and Approximation Algorithms, I had my obligatory teaching internship in Project and Analysis of Algorithms for the postgraduate program, where I was responsible for creating and evaluating assignments for 50+ students and answering general questions. [...] I am using as my environment the Qt Creator, and I am focusing in the algorithm for creation of specific graph classes inside the generategraphwidget. I have already implemented algorithms for Paths, Complete and Complete Bipartite graphs, besides fixing some details here and there. These modifications are still only in my local machine, as I am having some problems pushing the commits (I must be doing something wrong in my configuration). read more

How To Install Docker on Debian 9

2019-06-24 03:12:39

In this article, we will be installing and setting up Docker on a Debian 9 VPS.

Games: EA, Lutris, and Canonical's Second Thoughts After Valve's Response

2019-06-24 03:01:09

EA calls loot boxes 'surprise mechanics' and compares them to Kinder Eggs Confusion was a theme—over language, games, the questions—with highlights including one MP asking if Epic can close down text messages. He meant chat, but for a moment Epic's representatives struggled to explain that they don't have control over SMS. Later, Fortnite gets compared to a casino. Lutris is an excellent gaming platform! In Linux, typically, when there's a solution to a problem, there are seven other solutions to the same problem. But not so when it comes to Linux gaming. Here, we only have several incomplete solutions to a rather big problem. Steam did massively improve the situation, and it looks like the most mature and likely technology slash software to bring parity to the Linux gaming scene. Still, it's not a perfect fix. There are many Linux games that don't quite fit the Steam category [sic]. You have old games, indie games with their distribution channels, Windows games that need WINE, and so forth. If you want to have all these under a single umbrella, there isn't really a solution. Well. Maybe. A challenger appears: Lutris. Let's have a review. Valve looking to drop support for Ubuntu 19.10 and up due to Canonical's 32bit decision (updated) Update: Canonical are now saying 32bit libraries will be "frozen" and not entirely dropped. read more

BSD: DragonFlyBSD, ZFS vs. OpenZFS, FreeBSD Code

2019-06-24 02:25:11

DragonFlyBSD Picks Up Radeon Performance Improvements With Latest Code Update Slipping just past this week's DragonFlyBSD 5.6 release is now an early feature for the next series: continued work on the Radeon DRM driver ported to this BSD from the Linux kernel. ZFS vs. OpenZFS You’ve probably heard us say a mix of “ZFS” and “OpenZFS” and an explanation is long-overdue. Our Senior Analyst clears up what ZFS and OpenZFS refer to and how they differ. 8 Popular Products You Didn't Know Were Built with Open Source A popular streaming service, video games consoles, and mobile messaging all owe a debt to FreeBSD. read more

Free Command in Linux Explained With Examples

2019-06-24 01:52:36

This tutorial will give you a handy guide to install and setup a SFTP server in Linux.

Play Ascii Patrol Game in Linux Terminal!

2019-06-24 00:32:32

Typing a command in the Linux terminal is one of the exciting things. We are like a king who is giving orders to his soldiers to do certain things. Terminal on Linux has many benefits when you understand the commands that exist. In addition to executing a command, we can play games at the terminal.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 820

2019-06-24 00:18:06

This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: Clear Linux and Guix System 1.0.1News: Debian's progressing RISC-V port, Ubuntu dropping 32-bit packages, Red Hat explains networking bug, Zorin partners with Star LabsTips and tricks: Running Android applications on GNU/Linux with AnboxReleased last week: PCLinuxOS 2019.06, DragonFly BSD 5.6.0, Alpine 3.10.0Torrent....

There's A Professional Grade Digital Cinema Camera Powered By Linux

2019-06-23 23:25:09

Digital camera startup Octopus Cinema has been designing the "OCTOPUSCAMERA" as a digital cinema camera that's professional grade yet is an open platform with removable/upgradeable parts and this camera platform itself is running Linux...

How to Install GCC Compiler on CentOS 7

2019-06-23 23:12:29

This tutorial explains how to install GCC compiler on CentOS 7. We will show you how to install the distro stable version and the newer version of GCC available from the SCL repository.

Linux computer seller Star Labs now offering laptops with Zorin OS

2019-06-23 23:01:15

If you want a computer with a Linux-based operating system pre-installed, you can never go wrong with System76 or Dell. Of course, those two companies are hardly the only ones selling Linux-powered computers. For instance, the UK-based Star Labs also sells machines with Ubuntu and Linux Mint -- two very good operating systems. Well, Star Labs has seemingly gotten the memo on how great Zorin OS is, as the computer seller is now offering laptops with that operating system pre-installed. Zorin OS is an operating system that is ideal for those that want to switch from Windows, so having it… [Continue Reading]

Arguments | Another way to work with user inputs – Part 7

2019-06-23 17:52:16

Welcome to Arguments chapter of BASH scripting series. This chapter will introduce you to another new method of getting user inputs for your script. In the previous chapter, we’ve used the read command to get user inputs. The read command works after our bash program is invoked by our bash interpreter ie., user input is prompted after the program is run, but this time we are interested in getting inputs as parameters or arguments so it will later be processed by our program.

Microsoft Office vs LibreOffice

2019-06-23 17:29:11

Microsoft Office and LibreOffice are both excellent office suites, but how can you be sure which is right for you? On the surface the two look very similar, but there are some important differences to bear in mind when making your decision. read more

Linux 5.2-rc6

2019-06-23 17:14:21

I really was hoping that we'd continue to have an increasingly quiet and shrinking rc series. But that was not to be. rc6 is the biggest rc in number of commits we've had so far for this 5.2 cycle (obviously ignoring the merge window itself and rc1). And it's not just because of trivial patches (although admittedly we have those too), but we obviously had the TCP SACK/fragmentation/mss fixes in there, and they in turn required some fixes too. Happily we did pick up on the problem quickly - largely thanks to the patches making it into distro kernels quickly and then causing problems for the steam client of all things - but it's still something that doesn't exactly make me get the warm and fuzzies at this point in the release cycle. I'm also doing this rc on a Saturday, because I am going to spend all of tomorrow on a plane once again. So I'm traveling first for a conference and then for some R&R on a liveaboard, so I'm going to have spotty access to email for a few days, and then for a week I'll be entirely incommunicado. So rc7 will be delayed. I was thinking that I timed it all really well in what should be the quietest period of the release cycle for me, and now I obviously hope that last week really was a fluke. read more

Linux 5.2 rc6

2019-06-23 17:00:00

Linus Torvalds: I really was hoping that we'd continue to have an increasingly quiet and shrinking rc series. But that was not to be.

Canonical are now saying Ubuntu's 32bit is not being entirely dropped, 32bit libraries will be "frozen"

2019-06-23 16:41:46

Tags: MiscAs an update to the situation around Canonical planning to drop 32bit support (and Valve saying bye-bye to Ubuntu 19.10+ support), apparently they're not. Instead, the 32bit libraries will be frozen. Are you confused yet? I sure am. Canonical's Steve Langasek has attempted to clarify the situation. Here's what they said: I’m sorry that we’ve given anyone the impression that we are “dropping support for i386 applications”. That’s simply not the case. What we are dropping is updates to the i386 libraries, which will be frozen at the 18.04 LTS versions. But there is every intention to ensure that there is a clear story for how i386 applications (including games) can be run on versions of Ubuntu later than 19.10. That's at least a little better, isn't it? They also said a little further: […] since the vast majority of i386-only software is also legacy (closed-source, will never be rebuilt), it also does not generally benefit from newer libraries […] There's a pretty big difference from not being "included as an architecture", to having them available but frozen and still possible to use, isn't there? It's confusing, since that's not how it was originally explained. This is something that should have been said very clearly from the start. Perhaps this might not be the epic disaster many people (myself included) thought it might turn out to be. We still have to wait and see how exactly they implement all this, and how it will affect gaming.

Openwashing and FUD: A Roundup

2019-06-23 16:40:29

ACEINNA Launches OpenIMU300RI – Rugged Open-Source Inertial Measurement Unit Sensor [Ed: Here's “open-source” with a dash; new example of openwashing. I’m all for "open source" if and when it’s just a synonym of/for free/libre software. Sadly, however, nowadays “opensource” or “open-source” with a dash has nothing to do with freedom and it’s mostly marketing by openwashing.] Unifying open source and proprietary software [Ed: SAS explains how to push proprietary software while making it seem and feel "open". Stallman was right about "open source" being BS all along or becoming marketing BS or BS agenda that's mostly a distraction from free software and freedom.] Swarm64 Improves Elastic Scalability for PostgreSQL [Ed: One must sign in to download? I smell a trap/crap.] ...free, open source extension to PostgreSQL that enables better scaling and performance for analytics (OLAP) applications. The elastic, parallel scaling extension runs on standard server hardware or servers that are accelerated by FPGA boards. SparkFun Electronics® Releases First Open-Source, U.S.-Manufactured Embedded Systems Module [Ed: Good example of openwashing as there's nothing "open" about it] How HackerOne open sources security--one hacker at a time [Ed: Mac Asay openwashing HackerOne even though the platform is proprietary software] Few business executives have had as big of an impact on open source as Mårten Mickos, former CEO of MySQL and Eucalyptus and current CEO of HackerOne. While HackerOne might not look much like an open source company, that's kind of the point behind why Mickos wanted to join. No, not to escape open source, but rather to apply some of the lessons learned from his time in open source while learning some new lessons along the way. As he said in an interview, "HackerOne is doing to cybersecurity what Red Hat and MySQL did to software. It is about bringing the power of a vast community in a neatly packaged way to the tech companies and enterprises of the world." Swimlane open-sources graphish to help SecOps Teams [Ed: Exchange is proprietary software, so this cannot be real FOSS but more like openwashing with Microsoft added for 'good measure'. There also back doors.] While having a conversation on Twitter about Microsoft Graph API I was convinced that the traditional Exchange eDiscovery features were not available in the Microsoft Graph API. Boy was I wrong. Hackers Can Spoof ‘Presidential Alerts’ Using Off-The-Rack Hardware And An Open-Source Software [Ed: How to make "Open Source" sound malicious just because rogue actors too can use it; they could use proprietary software instead.] The newly acquired system by the U.S. government to send unblockable messages to U.S. citizens in times of an emergency from the President can be hacked by hackers using off-the-rack hardware and open-source software, a study revealed. According to researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder in a study published this week, hackers can use the vulnerabilities in the LTE network in order to send bogus presidential alerts to Americans within the range of an entire 50,000-seat football stadium with little effort in order to incite panic and chaos among those who receive the fake message. Open Source Clones Unofficially Sold on the Microsoft Store [Ed: Microsoft keeps allowing these things again and again. If it harms FOSS and tarnishes its name, then Microsoft is OK with it.] Developers are taking free open source programs, repackaging them as Windows 10 UWP apps under different names, and then offering them on the Microsoft Store. In some cases, the developers are offering these programs as paid apps or with in-app purchases. This is not the first time third-party developers have brought open source software to the Microsoft Store and charged for it. Last year a third-party published LibreOffice to the Microsoft Store and was charging $2.99 for it while implying the money went to supporting the Document Foundation developers, which was not the case. Fake (Commercial) versions of Open Source applications on the Microsoft Store [Ed: Microsoft has long been happy to host anything that harms FOSS and makes it look bad. Long history to that.] The Microsoft Store, formerly known as Windows Store, has had its fair share of application related issues in the past that ranged from copycat applications, deceiving apps and deceptive apps being published to the Store, to publishers gaming the Store system to improve sales or visibility. I noticed for a while that third-party developers would publish open source applications on the Microsoft Store. A prime example of this is the release of Mozilla Thunderbird which is offered by a third-party developer for free. Publication is not illegal necessarily as it depends on the license of the Open Source application. A thread on the Portable Freeware Collection forum highlights a growing issue related to open source software on the Microsoft Store. O’Reilly Announces Speaker and Session Lineup for OSCON 2019 [Ed: Of course O’Reilly still boosts Microsoft's campaigns of entryism at OSCON (been doing it for a decade at least)] GitHub Releases New Tools to Report Vulnerabilities [Ed: Microsoft giving itself the authority to change other people's code on GitHub in the name of "security"; Microsoft is also the NSA's foremost back doors partner. It's even worse because not only can the NSA alter code in GitHub but it also gets a list of holes before they get patched.] Blue Star Software Announces 5-Day Training Course for Ghidra, Open Source Reverse Engineering Tool [Ed: Teaching an NSA tool] Google Turns to Retro Cryptography to Keep Datasets Private [Ed: No, Google does not keep data private. It asks everyone to give it data and then shares that with the US military/government. This is misleading a narrative, albeit a very common one.] Google open sources method to join datasets without gatecrashing privacy [Ed: Since when does Google care about privacy anyway? Its 'surveillance capitalism' business model is inherently antithetical to privacy.] Google open-sources cryptographic tool to keep data sets private [Ed: Perhaps partly a publicity stunt to help Google win contracts where it gets to suck up lots of data, such as medical files around the world] Google unveils open-source cryptography tool to protect collaborative datasets [Ed: It looks likely to be a charm offensive by Google and its military partners to suck up billions of people's medical data] Private Join and Compute is Google's free/open source tool to allow "mulitparty computation" of encrypted data without decryption [Ed: Even BoingBoing promotes this just because it's Google] Google open sources Private Join and Compute, a tool for sharing confidential data sets [Ed: Google releasing something called "Private" is like something called "Ethical" being released from Microsoft] As part of its efforts to support user privacy and security, Google on Wednesday announced the open-source release of Private Join and Compute, a multi-party computation (MPC) tool designed to help organizations work together with confidential data sets. Google Releases Open Source Cryptographic Tool [Ed: Google which sends all your data to the NSA through back doors wants you to use its encryption and reckons openwashing can help adoption.] Google has released an open source cryptographic tool called Private Join and Compute that allows for different datasets to calculate a result, while not revealing sensitive or private information about certain parts of the equation, according to a report by Wired. The report used the example of the relationship between school lunch and student health. In order to figure out how the two variables affect each other, the equation would need healthcare data, which is private, to be crossed with school data. Google’s service would let all of the parties compare info without the exposing of any private data. “The net result is that we can perform this computation without exposing any individual data and only getting the aggregate result,” said Amanda Walker, director of privacy tools and infrastructure engineering at the tech giant. “The naïve way to do this would be to take two sensitive data sets, dump them into a single database and do the join and the sum, but then you’ve got everything together and at risk of a data breach.” Open Source Software Policies – Why You Need Them And What They Should Include[Ed: Of course the lawyers spread FUD about FOSS in an effort to create complications and make themselves 'necessary'] Open Source Software Policies – Why You Need Them And What They Should Include[Ed: ...and to magnify their FUD the lawyers will post it everywhere they can...] Open Source Software Policies – Why You Need Them And What They Should Include Podcast: Development Agility and Open-Source Vulnerability Prioritization [Ed: Giving a platform to Microsoft partners whose business model is selling proprietary software by attacking and smearing FOSS, just like Black Duck -- they hijack FOSS voice] On this week’s episode of the SecurityIntelligence podcast, WhiteSource Senior Director of Product Management Rami Elron joins the dynamic duo of David Moulton and Pam Cobb to crack the case of open-source vulnerabilities. With security risks on the rise, how can organizations effectively prioritize top threats and control cybersecurity complexity? Can Your Patching Strategy Keep Up with the Demands of Open Source? [Ed: Dark Reading lets the Black Duck people (a Microsoft proxy that attacks FOSS for over a decade) spread self-promotion FUD for proprietary software.] Facebook debuts PyRobot, an open-source framework for controlling robots PyRobot: Facebook’s Open-Source Robotics Framework Designed To Make Controlling Bots Easy Facebook PyRobot goes open source to speed robotics, AI research [Ed: Merely a utility of spying, not anything else. Trying to make it seem "ethical".] Fusion Foundation Announces MainNet Launch of its Open Source Protocol to Bring Blockchain Finance to the Masses [Ed: "Open Source Protocol" (or API) classic example of openwashing] Applitools Eyes now free for open source libraries [Ed: The art of openwashing something because it is temporarily gratis] Applitools Launches Free Open Source Software Licensing, Partners with Open Source Apprentice Program [Ed: Just saying "Open Source" twice in the headline, but it's not FOSS] SD Times news digest: Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra, Applitools announces free OSS licensing, and Appery.io’s Ionic 4 integration Contrast Security Launches Next Generation Open Source Software Security Platform for DevOps [Ed: More openwashing nonsense; trying to make Contrast Security come across as "open" because it something it can analyse] Hazelcast open source in-memory data grid secures $21.5 million funding, expands platform to real-time streaming data Conceptually, caches and in-memory data grids are very close anyway: it's all about using fast memory to speed up access to data residing in slow(er) storage systems. Doing caching efficiently is a hard problem, and Luck is among the leading experts in the field. About a year ago, however, Luck stepped down from his role as Hazelcast CEO and took over the CTO role, while Kelly Herrell became CEO. Self-driving car startup Argo AI is giving researchers free access to its HD maps [Ed: They're openwashing by conflating access to some data with "open source"] Argo AI is releasing curated data along with high-definition maps to researchers for free, the latest company in the autonomous vehicle industry to open-source some of the information it has captured while developing and testing self-driving cars. WATCH: The Advantages of Not Being Open Source (Part II) [Ed: In 2019 I think that openwashing volume outweighs and headlines outnumber those of real FOSS. RIP, "open source" (1998-2018). You had a good run before becoming marketing strategy for proprietary software.] Hashgraph is an algorithm, correct. The IP for Hashgraph is privately owned. But it’s … we’re using the patent in order to solve a fundamental problem with existing networks. And the entire community of public distributed ledger technology platforms are all open source, they’re not proprietary, everything is open source. While that’s been good for innovation, it’s also created chaos in a certain way that has prevented mainstream adoption by big enterprise or even medium-sized businesses. And it’s because everyone knows that these networks like Bitcoin are going to ultimately split into competing networks with competing cryptocurrencies and that represents risk to any business manager considering building an application on one of these public networks. So we’re using the IP of Hashgraph to bring stability to a platform that no other open source platform can achieve. read more

Would Steam Losing Ubuntu Support Make You Switch Distro? [Poll]

2019-06-23 15:41:56

This week's poll asks whether Steam dropping official support for Ubuntu 19.10 would make you switch (or consider switching) Linux distribution. This post, Would Steam Losing Ubuntu Support Make You Switch Distro? [Poll], was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Microsoft Makes It Easier to Try the Open Source Windows Terminal App

2019-06-23 15:28:27

I carry word that users can now install the new Windows Terminal app on Windows 10 direct from the Microsoft Store – no need to build the app from source. This post, Microsoft Makes It Easier to Try the Open Source Windows Terminal App, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Microsoft Makes It Easier to Try the New Windows Terminal App

2019-06-23 15:28:27

I carry word that users can now install the new Windows Terminal app on Windows 10 direct from the Microsoft Store – no need to build the app from source. This post, Microsoft Makes It Easier to Try the New Windows Terminal App, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Steam Won’t Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

2019-06-23 15:12:10

One of the downsides of dropping 32 bit support.

Ubuntu Developer Talks Down Impact Of 32-Bit Changes For Ubuntu 19.10

2019-06-23 15:00:17

Following Valve saying they won't be officially supporting Ubuntu 19.10 and Wine developers questioning their Ubuntu 32-bit builds following the announcement this week of not providing new 32-bit packages for new Ubuntu releases, longtime Ubuntu developer and Canonical employee Steve Langasek is trying to provide some clarity into the situation...

Is Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All?

2019-06-23 14:34:34

A forum post from a leading Ubuntu developer appears to contradict early suggestions that Ubuntu will drop 32-bit app support beginning in 19.10. This post, Is Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All?, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All? (Updated)

2019-06-23 14:34:34

A forum post from a leading Ubuntu developer appears to contradict early suggestions that Ubuntu will drop 32-bit app support beginning in 19.10. This post, Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All? (Updated), was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All?

2019-06-23 14:34:34

A forum post from a leading Ubuntu developer appears to contradict early suggestions that Ubuntu will drop 32-bit app support beginning in 19.10. This post, Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All?, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Steam will not support Ubuntu 19.10 onwards

2019-06-23 13:57:26

It is only a few days since Canonical announced that it was dropping support for 32-bit packages as of Ubuntu 19.10. The fall out from this is now being felt. While there were many developers who were not happy with the decision, Linux-based gamers are now likely to be more than slightly annoyed. Steam has announced that "Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to our users". See also: Ubuntu is dropping i386 support and WINE developers are irked Kali Linux sets out its roadmap for 2019/20 Netflix discovers SACK Panic and other… [Continue Reading]

AMD Sends In Navi Support & Other Remaining AMDGPU Changes For Linux 5.3

2019-06-23 12:00:00

On Saturday night AMDGPU/Radeon DRM maintainer Alex Deucher sent in the final batch of feature updates to DRM-Next that is targeting the upcoming Linux 5.3 kernel...

KDE's Night Color Feature Being Ported From Wayland To X11

2019-06-23 10:51:49

It's another busy summer in the KDE space with a nice mixture of bug fixes and features being pursued for KDE Frameworks, KDE Plasma, and KDE Applications...

Fedora 31 Will Finally Disable OpenSSH Root Password-Based Logins By Default

2019-06-23 10:06:19

Fedora 31 will harden up its default configuration by finally disabling password-based OpenSSH root log-ins, matching the upstream default of the past four years and behavior generally enforced by other Linux distributions...

Microsoft Apparently Did a Patrick Durusau on Wim Coekaerts to Broaden Its Control Over GNU/Linux

2019-06-23 09:23:22

Microsoft tactics for defection and takeover of the competition (without coming across as hostile) aren't new tactics; internal documents from Microsoft explain how to achieve this

Linux Kernel "LOCKDOWN" Ported To Being An LSM, Still Undergoing Review

2019-06-23 08:45:55

It didn't make it for the Linux 5.2 kernel and now it's up to its 33rd revision on the Linux kernel mailing list... The "lockdown" patches for locking down access to various kernel hardware features has been reworked now and is a Linux Security Module (LSM) as it still tries to get enough endorsements to be mainlined...

How to Show a List of All Databases in MySQL

2019-06-23 07:51:53

This tutorial explains how to show all databases in a MySQL or MariaDB server through the command line.

KStars v3.3.1 is released

2019-06-23 07:34:05

KStars v3.3.1 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux on all platforms (Intel/AMD and ARM). This is yet another maintenance release with a few new experimental features and addons. read more

DragonFlyBSD Picks Up Radeon Performance Improvements With Latest Code Update

2019-06-23 06:57:59

Slipping just past this week's DragonFlyBSD 5.6 release is now an early feature for the next series: continued work on the Radeon DRM driver ported to this BSD from the Linux kernel...

One Of AMD's Leading LLVM Compiler Experts Jumped Ship To Unity

2019-06-23 04:05:19

AMD has lost one of their leading LLVM compiler developers as well as serving as a Vulkan/SPIR-V expert with being involved in those Khronos specifications...

Kernel: Rants, PulseAudio 12, Valve-Related Bug and Mesa 19.1.1 RC

2019-06-23 02:23:26

'Bulls%^t! Complete bull$h*t!' Reset the clock on the last time woke Linus Torvalds exploded at a Linux kernel dev Linux kernel chieftain Linus Torvalds owes the swear jar a few quid this week, although by his standards this most recent rant of his is relatively restrained. Over on the kernel development mailing list, in a long and involved thread about the functionality and efficiency of operating system page caches, firebrand-turned-woke Torvalds described Aussie programmer Dave Chinner’s arguments in the debate as "bullshit," "complete bullshit," and "obviously garbage." To be fair to the open-source overlord, this is a far less personal attack than previous outbursts, such as the time he slammed "some security people" as "just f#cking morons," or that unforgettable straight-to-the-point detonation: "Mauro, SHUT THE F**K UP." It Looks Like PulseAudio 13.0 Will Be Releasing Soon It's been a year since the release of PulseAudio 12 and even eleven months since the last point release but it looks like the next PulseAudio release will be out very soon. The next PulseAudio release has been under discussion with the sorting out of when the release will take place and any blocker bugs. As it stands now, there is just one blocker bug remaining and that is addressing a regression. A One Line Kernel Patch Appears To Solve The Recent Linux + Steam Networking Regression As a follow-up to the issue reported on Friday regarding the latest Linux kernel releases causing problems for Valve's Steam client, a fix appears pending that with changing around one line of code does appear to address the regression. Linus Torvalds got involved and pointed out a brand new kernel patch that may solve the issue. That patch was quickly reaffirmed by Linux gamers as well as prominent Valve Linux developer Pierre-Loup A. Griffais. Mesa 19.1.1 release candidate Hello list, The candidate for the Mesa 19.1.1 is now available. Currently we have: - 27 queued - 0 nominated (outstanding) - and 0 rejected patch The current queue consists mostly in fixes for different drivers (RADV, ANV, Nouveau, Virgl, V3D, R300g, ...) The queue also contains different fixes for different parts (Meson build, GLX, etc). Take a look at section "Mesa stable queue" for more information Testing reports/general approval -------------------------------- Any testing reports (or general approval of the state of the branch) will be greatly appreciated. The plan is to have 19.1.1 this Tuesday (25th June), around or shortly after 10:00 GMT. If you have any questions or suggestions - be that about the current patch queue or otherwise, please go ahead. Trivial merge conflicts ----------------------- commit 25a34df61439b25645d03510d6354cb1f5e8a185 Author: Kenneth Graunke iris: Fix iris_flush_and_dirty_history to actually dirty history. (cherry picked from commit 64fb20ed326fa0e524582225faaa4bb28f6e4349) Cheers, J.A. Mesa 19.1.1 Is Coming Next Week With A Variety Of Fixes Debuting two weeks ago was the Mesa 19.1 quarterly feature update while due out early next week is the first bug-fix point release. Mesa 19.1 is a huge update over 19.0 and earlier. Mesa 19.1 brought multiple new Gallium3D drivers as well as a new Vulkan driver (TURNIP), performance optimizations, new Vulkan extensions, mature Icelake support, and a variety of other features as listed in the aforelinked article. read more

OpenBSD Leftovers

2019-06-23 02:16:36

OpenBSD Adds Initial User-Space Support For Vulkan Somewhat surprisingly, OpenBSD has added the Vulkan library and ICD loader support as their newest port. This new graphics/vulkan-loader port provides the generic Vulkan library and ICD support that is the common code for Vulkan implementations on the system. This doesn't enable any Vulkan hardware drivers or provide something new not available elsewhere, but is rare seeing Vulkan work among the BSDs. There is also in ports the related components like the SPIR-V headers and tools, glsllang, and the Vulkan tools and validation layers. SSH gets protection against side channel attacks Implementation-wise, keys are encrypted "shielded" when loaded and then automatically and transparently unshielded when used for signatures or when being saved/serialised. Hopefully we can remove this in a few years time when computer architecture has become less unsafe. doas environmental security Ted Unangst (tedu@) posted to the tech@ mailing list regarding recent changes to environment handling in doas (in -current): [...] read more

Programming: PNG, AArch64, Python and Tor

2019-06-23 02:14:43

Segfaults and Twitter monkeys: a tale of pointlessness For a few years in the 1990s, when PNG was just getting established as a Web image format, I was a developer on the libpng team. One reason I got involved is that the compression patent on GIFs was a big deal at the time. I had been the maintainer of GIFLIB since 1989; it was on my watch that Marc Andreesen chose that code for use in the first graphics-capable browser in ’94. But I handed that library off to a hacker in Japan who I thought would be less exposed to the vagaries of U.S. IP law. (Years later, after the century had turned and the LZW patents expired, it came back to me.) Then, sometime within a few years of 1996, I happened to read the PNG standard, and thought the design of the format was very elegant. So I started submitting patches to libpng and ended up writing the support for six of the minor chunk types, as well as implementing the high-level interface to the library that’s now in general use. As part of my work on PNG, I volunteered to clean up some code that Greg Roelofs had been maintaining and package it for release. This was “gif2png” and it was more or less the project’s official GIF converter. AArch64 support for ELF Dissector After having been limited to maintenance for a while I finally got around to some feature work on ELF Dissector again this week, another side-project of mine I haven’t written about here yet. ELF Dissector is an inspection tool for the internals of ELF files, the file format used for executables and shared libraries on Linux and a few other operating systems. [...] ELF Dissector had its first commit more than six years ago, but it is still lingering around in a playground repository, which doesn’t really do it justice. One major blocker for making it painlessly distributable however are its dependencies on private Binutils/GCC API. Using the Capstone disassembler is therefore also a big step towards addressing that, now only the use of the demangler API remains. Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (clxxxiii) stackoverflow python report denemo @ Savannah: Release 2.3 is imminent - please test. Arguments | Another way to work with user inputs – Part 7 Call for setting up new obfs4 bridges BridgeDB is running low on obfs4 bridges and often fails to provide users with three bridges per request. Besides, we recently fixed a BridgeDB issue that could get an obfs4 bridge blocked because of its vanilla bridge descriptor: <https://bugs.torproject.org/28655> We therefore want to encourage volunteers to set up new obfs4 bridges to help censored users. Over the last few weeks, we have been improving our obfs4 setup guide which walks you through the process: <https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/PluggableTransports/obfs4proxy>p> read more

Security: Windows, 'DevSecOps', SSH, Bash and More

2019-06-23 02:10:47

Electronic Health Records at 26 Hospitals Hit by Two-Hour Outage [iophk: "Windows TCO"] Universal, which manages more than 350 health-care facilities in the U.S. and U.K., declined to specify the technical issues or say how many patient records were affected. The problem lasted for less than two hours and the affected hospitals have returned to normal operations, said Eric Goodwin, chief information officer of the King of Prussia, Pennsylvania-based company. DevSecOps: 4 key considerations for beginners Security used to be the responsibility of a dedicated team in the last development stage, but with development cycles increasing in number and speed, security practices need to be constantly updated. This has led to the rise of DevSecOps, which emphasizes security within DevOps. Companies need DevSecOps to make sure their initiatives run safely and securely. Without DevSecOps, DevOps teams need to rebuild and update all their systems when a vulnerability is found, wasting time and effort. OpenSSH to Keep Private Keys Encrypted at Rest in RAM A commit for the OpenSSH project adds protection for private keys in memory when they are not in use, making it more difficult for an adversary to extract them through side-channel attacks leveraging hardware vulnerabilities. OpenSSH is the most popular implementation of the SSH (Secure Shell) protocol, being the default solution in many Linux distributions for encrypting connections to a remote system. OpenSSH adds protection against Spectre, Meltdown, Rowhammer and RAMBleed attacks GNU Bash Unsupported Characters Heap-Based Buffer Overflow Vulnerability [CVE-2012-6711] A vulnerability in the lib/sh/strtrans.c:anicstr function of GNU Bash could allow an authenticated, local attacker to execute code on a targeted system.The vulnerability is due buffer errors within the lib/sh/strtrans.c:anicstr function of the affected software. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by providing print data through the echo built-in function. A successful exploit could allow the attacker to execute code on the targeted system.GNU Bash has confirmed this vulnerability and released a software patch. Daily News Roundup: Malware in Your Pirated Software Researchers at ESET and Malwarebytes have discovered crypto mining malware hidden in pirated music production software. A Method for Establishing Liability for Data Breaches Last month, the First American Financial Corporation—which provides title insurance for millions of Americans—acknowledged a cybersecurity vulnerability that potentially exposed 885 million private financial records related to mortgage deals to unauthorized viewers. These records might have revealed bank account numbers and statements, mortgage and tax records, Social Security numbers, wire transaction receipts, and driver’s license images to such viewers. If history is any guide, not much will happen and companies holding sensitive personal information on individuals will have little incentive to improve their cybersecurity postures. Congress needs to act to provide such incentives. The story is all too familiar, as news reports of data breaches involving the release of personal information for tens of millions of, or even a hundred million, Americans have become routine. A company (or a government agency) pays insufficient attention to cybersecurity matters despite warnings that the cybersecurity measures it takes are inadequate and therefore fails to prevent a breach that could be remediated by proper attention to such warnings. In the aftermath of such incidents, errant companies are required by law to report breaches to the individuals whose personal information has been potentially compromised. Frequently, these companies also offer free credit monitoring services to affected individuals for a year or two. read more

How OIN's Linux-Based Patent Non-Aggression Community Drove Open Source Growth

2019-06-23 01:34:00

"Some businesses, such as pharmaceuticals, still spend enormous amounts of time and money on intellectual property (IP) fights," reports ZDNet. But "thanks to the Open Invention Network (OIN), the largest patent non-aggression community in history, Linux and related open-source technologies have become mostly free of these expensive entanglements." And now they're reporting that the OIN's membership has grown to over 3,000 licensees: OIN's mission is to enable Linux, its related software, and its programmers to develop and monetize without being hogtied by patent fights. In Linux's early years, this was a constant threat. Now, thanks largely to the OIN's efforts to get everyone to agree on the basic open-source principle -- that's it's better and more profitable to share than to cling to proprietary property -- open-source software has taken off in the marketplace... The OIN, which has grown by 50% in the last two years, has turned patent non-aggression into policy for thousands of companies. By agreeing to the OIN license, members gain access to patented inventions worth hundreds of millions of dollars while promoting a favorable environment for Linux and related open source software. The license works by everyone agreeing to patent non-aggression in core open-source technologies by cross-licensing Linux System patents to one another on a royalty-free basis. OIN-owned patents are similarly licensed royalty-free to any organization that agrees not to assert its patents against the Linux System. While it started out just covering the Linux operating system the Linux System has evolved to address Linux and adjacent Linux-related open-source technologies. It now covers open-source programs covering mobile communications, mobile payments, computing, blockchain, cloud, Internet of Things, and embedded and automotive technologies. "For innovation and invention, open source and Linux are unmatched in the modern world. The open-source community's success is powered by the fact that shared innovation acts as a force multiplier -- where one plus one equals orders of magnitude more than two," said Keith Bergelt, OIN's CEO. "OIN's remarkable growth has been driven by heightened recognition of the importance of open source and a broad-based recognition of patent non-aggression as a cultural norm in the Linux and greater open source community. Joining OIN is viewed by many as a litmus test of authenticity in the open-source community." The Linux Foundation's executive director says their group's success "has been directly enabled by the patent risk mitigation platform that the OIN has provided. "Absent the now 3,000 strong member community of patent non-aggression that Keith Bergelt and his team at OIN have painstakingly built over the last dozen or so years, the level of open-source software innovation and unprecedented adoption rates could simply not have been achieved." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Enso OS, A Desktop Mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS

2019-06-23 01:14:06

Enso OS is a relatively new GNU/Linux distro based on Ubuntu with XFCE desktop coupled with Gala Window Manager. Looking at Enso is like looking at a mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS. It features a Super key start menu called Panther and a global menu on its top panel, making the interface very interesting to try. This overview briefly highlights the user interface for you. read more

Stellarium v0.19.1 has been released!

2019-06-23 01:04:24

Thank you very much to community for bug reports, feature requests and contributions! Also: Stellarium 0.19.1 Released with A Large List of Changes read more

Games: Ascii Patrol Game, Canonical/Valve, and Weekend Picks

2019-06-23 00:50:53

Play Ascii Patrol Game in Linux Terminal! Typing a command in the Linux terminal is one of the exciting things. We are like a king who is giving orders to his soldiers to do certain things. Terminal on Linux has many benefits when you understand the commands that exist. In addition to executing a command, we can play games at the terminal. Playing games on the Linux terminal is one of entertainment. There are many Terminal-based games that you can play on the Linux terminal, one of which is Ascii Patroll. This game is inspired by the classic game "Moon Patrol", and we can run it on the CLI. Valve Will Not Be Officially Supporting Ubuntu 19.10+ The planned dropping of 32-bit support on Ubuntu saga continues... Well known Valve Linux developer Pierre-Loup Griffais has said they plan to officially stop supporting Ubuntu for Steam on Linux. Valve looking to drop support for Ubuntu 19.10 and up due to Canonical's 32bit decision Things are starting to get messy, after Canonical announced the end of 32bit support from Ubuntu 19.10 onwards, Valve have now responded. [...] I can't say I am surprised by Valve's response here. Canonical pretty clearly didn't think it through enough on how it would affect the desktop. It certainly seems like Canonical also didn't speak to enough developers first. Perhaps this will give Valve a renewed focus on SteamOS? Interestingly, Valve are now funding some work on KWin (part of KDE). What are you playing this weekend and what do you think about it? It's mostly Dota Underlords for me Let's lighten the mood a bit shall we? It's question time here on GamingOnLinux! Let's have a talk about what you've been playing recently. I will of course go first: Dota Underlords. I have quite the sweet spot for it already, even though I'm absolutely terrible at it. This might be the game to finally get me to kick my unhealthy Rocket League obsession, which is amazing considering how radically different they are. I adore strategy games though and unlike normal Dota, I don't need to think ridiculously quickly. Since you don't need any kind of reflexes for it, sitting back and relaxing with the Steam Controller is another reason I quite like Dota Underlords. In the evenings on weekends especially, I can be quite the lazy-gamer, so anything that allows me to kick back with it is likely to get my vote. After only being out for a few days, it's already annihilated the player record for Artifact. Artifact's all-time high was only just over 60K whereas Underlords has sailed past 190K, although that shouldn't be too surprising since Underlords is free and isn't rammed full of micro-transactions (yet?) and it helps being on mobile as well of course (According to one of the SteamDB folk, the mobile players are being counted too). read more

Linux 5.2-rc6 Released With Steam Networking Fix - The Biggest Post-RC1 Release

2019-06-22 23:48:24

Linus Torvalds released the Linux 5.2-rc6 development kernel a day ahead of schedule to better fit around his summer travels...

DSA-4470 pdns

2019-06-22 22:00:00

security update

What are you playing this weekend and what do you think about it? It's mostly Dota Underlords for me

2019-06-22 21:28:12

Tags: MiscLet's lighten the mood a bit shall we? It's question time here on GamingOnLinux! Let's have a talk about what you've been playing recently. I will of course go first: Dota Underlords. I have quite the sweet spot for it already, even though I'm absolutely terrible at it. This might be the game to finally get me to kick my unhealthy Rocket League obsession, which is amazing considering how radically different they are. I adore strategy games though and unlike normal Dota, I don't need to think ridiculously quickly. Since you don't need any kind of reflexes for it, sitting back and relaxing with the Steam Controller is another reason I quite like Dota Underlords. In the evenings on weekends especially, I can be quite the lazy-gamer, so anything that allows me to kick back with it is likely to get my vote. After only being out for a few days, it's already annihilated the player record for Artifact. Artifact's all-time high was only just over 60K whereas Underlords has sailed past 190K, although that shouldn't be too surprising since Underlords is free and isn't rammed full of micro-transactions (yet?) and it helps being on mobile as well of course (According to one of the SteamDB folk, the mobile players are being counted too). Based on what the Underlords team have said, coming "soon" will be: Full Scoreboard Social features: Scrolling through the map, hearing other player's fights and full chat. Hero VO. Balance: Dragon Alliance, Dragon Units and Items (Boots) They also said they're exploring a "Turbo Mode" for those who find games a bit too long. I also love the sound of that very much! What else? ISLANDERS! An instant purchase the moment Linux support became available, what a beautiful city-builder that's not really like any other. Incredible style, with fun game-play that has you trying to get your score constantly higher and it doesn't take a huge amount of attention from a tired mind. On top of that I also played the Linux Distribution-Hopping Game 2.0, with a full switch to Manjaro. So far, so good. Everything installed smoothly, grabbing extra software is easy and KDE shines on it. I also finally managed to get our livestreamer, Sin, to get rid of Windows finally too—result! Although her install wasn't so smooth, as the NVIDIA driver failed the first time much to my annoyance. A quick update, a second driver install attempt and all up and running once again. So, what have you been playing recently and what do you think about it?

Mesa 19.1.1 Is Coming Next Week With A Variety Of Fixes

2019-06-22 21:08:21

Debuting two weeks ago was the Mesa 19.1 quarterly feature update while due out early next week is the first bug-fix point release...

Touch panel PCs offer a choice of 64 models mixing different sizes and Intel chips

2019-06-22 20:45:23

Taicenn’s Linux-friendly, IP65 protected “TPC-DCM” industrial panel PCs let you choose between 6th or 7th Gen U-series Core, Apollo Lake, or Bay Trail CPUs with 2x GbE, SATA, optional wireless, and capacitive touchscreens between 15 and 24 inches. Taicenn, which last year introduced an Intel Bay Trail based, in-vehicle TPC-DCXXXC1E panel PC has now returned […]

Steam will no longer support Ubuntu, says Valve developer

2019-06-22 20:17:46

Steam is dropping official support for Ubuntu, which is currently the world’s most popular desktop Linux distribution. The bombshell news was delivered by Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais on Twitter: The move, not unexpected, follows Ubuntu’s […] This post, Steam will no longer support Ubuntu, says Valve developer, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Steam will no longer support Ubuntu, say Valve

2019-06-22 20:17:46

Steam is dropping official support for Ubuntu, which is currently the world’s most popular desktop Linux distribution. The bombshell news was delivered by Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais on Twitter: The move, not unexpected, follows Ubuntu’s […] This post, Steam will no longer support Ubuntu, say Valve, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

OpenBSD Adds Initial User-Space Support For Vulkan

2019-06-22 19:57:52

Somewhat surprisingly, OpenBSD has added the Vulkan library and ICD loader support as their newest port...

How to Install Phorum with Nginx on Fedora 30

2019-06-22 19:10:43

Phorum is a PHP and MySQL based Open Source forum software. In this guide, we will guide you step-by-step through the Phorum installation process on the Fedora 30 operating system using Nginx as the web server, MariaDB as the database, and acme.sh and Let's Encrypt for HTTPS.

The Linux Foundation’s New Vice Chair, Wim Coekaerts, Worked for Microsoft

2019-06-22 17:36:03

The Linux Foundation is boosting the Microsoft boosters (as above) and calls that “community”

Stable kernels 5.1.13, 5.1.14, 4.19.54, 4.19.55, 4.14.129, 4.9.183, and 4.4.183

2019-06-22 17:10:34

Linux 5.1.13 I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.13 kernel. All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s... Linux 5.1.14 Linux 4.19.54 Linux 4.19.55 Linux 4.14.129 Linux 4.9.183 Linux 4.4.183 read more

Fragmentation: Understanding Disk and RAM Fragmentation

2019-06-22 17:00:00

EnterpriseStorageForum: Disk fragmentation is a common occurrence in modern operating systems and applications as data storage is often allocated in an non-sequential approach.

OpenSSH Now Encrypts Secret Keys in Memory Against Side-Channel Attacks

2019-06-22 16:20:55

In recent years, several groups of cybersecurity researchers have disclosed dozens of memory side-channel vulnerabilities in modern processors and DRAMs, like Rowhammer, RAMBleed, Spectre, and Meltdown. Did you ever notice that they all had at least one thing in common? That's OpenSSH. As a proof-of-concept, many researchers demonstrated their side-channel attacks against OpenSSH

Valve Will Not Be Officially Supporting Ubuntu 19.10

2019-06-22 14:34:49

Comments

Microsoft Releases First Preview Of Windows Terminal

2019-06-22 13:49:24

In addition to the recent preview of Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL2), Microsoft also kept to their word from the Build 2019 conference of issuing their first preview of "Windows Terminal" in June. The first of several preview releases of Windows Terminal is now available from the Microsoft Store...

DevSecOps: 4 key considerations for beginners

2019-06-22 13:00:00

It isn't entirely up to the developer to implement DevSecOps standards within the organization.

Ubuntu 19.10 Dropping 32-bit Support Leaves Developers Fuming

2019-06-22 12:18:41

There will be no 32-bit support at all in Ubuntu 19.10. This is problematic for developers of Wine and Steam and gaming on Ubuntu might be in trouble. read more

Valve Is Funding Improvements To KDE's KWin & More Work On X.Org

2019-06-22 11:31:47

As some good news this week amid all the 32-bit Linux gaming drama this week and the networking snafu... Valve is now funding another developer to work on upstream open-source code, in particular on the KDE side this time with a developer who had been working for Blue Systems...

Wine-Staging 4.11 Released With Its 800+ Patches On Top Of Wine

2019-06-22 11:21:37

Just hours after releasing Wine 4.11, the team maintaining the experimental/testing version of Wine -- Wine-Staging -- issued their release with more than 800 patches re-based on top...

FLOSS Weekly 53:4 All Things Open 2019

2019-06-22 11:17:23

All Things Open is a polyglot technology conference focusing on the tools, processes and people making open source possible. Target audience includes designers, developers, decision makers, entrepreneurs and technologists of all types and skill levels.

It Looks Like PulseAudio 13.0 Will Be Releasing Soon

2019-06-22 11:17:18

It's been a year since the release of PulseAudio 12 and even eleven months since the last point release but it looks like the next PulseAudio release will be out very soon...

Valve Will Not Be Officially Supporting Ubuntu 19.10+

2019-06-22 11:00:52

The planned dropping of 32-bit support on Ubuntu saga continues... Well known Valve Linux developer Pierre-Loup Griffais has said they plan to officially stop supporting Ubuntu for Steam on Linux...

Important, but obscure, sysadmin tool osquery gets a foundation of its own

2019-06-22 09:42:43

This relatively unknown, but useful, sysadmin tool is getting a new chance for glory via The Linux Foundation.

PoC Released for Outlook Flaw that Microsoft Patched 6 Month After Discovery

2019-06-22 08:28:59

As we reported two days ago, Microsoft this week released an updated version of its Outlook app for Android that patches a severe remote code execution vulnerability (CVE-2019-1105) that impacted over 100 million users. However, at that time, very few details of the flaw were available in the advisory, which just revealed that the earlier versions of the email app contained a cross-site

Open Source Slack Alternative Mattermost Gets $50M Funding

2019-06-22 07:11:00

Mattermost, which presents itself as an open source alternative to Slack raised $50M in series B funding. This is definitely something to get excited for. Slack is a cloud-based team collaboration software that is mainly used for internal team communication. Enterprises, startups and even open source projects worldwide use it interact with colleagues and project members. Slack is free with limited features while the paid enterprise version has premium features. Slack is valued at $20 billion in June, 2019. You can guess the kind of impact it has made in the tech industry and certainly more products are trying to compete with Slack. read more

Cloudflare's random number generator, robotics data visualization, npm token scanning, and more news

2019-06-22 07:00:00

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look Cloudflare's open source random number generator, more open source robotics data, new npm functionality, and more! read more