8 Practical Examples of the usermod Command in Linux

2020-01-17 11:23:35

Games: Slay the Spire, Humble Australia Fire Relief Bundle, Stadia, Open Surge and Boxtron

2020-01-17 11:20:56

Graphics: CVE-2019-14615, Mir 1.7 Release, Panfrost Talk ("Liberating ARM GPUs")

2020-01-17 11:14:40

16 Open Source Cloud Storage Software for Linux in 2020

2020-01-17 10:59:23

The cloud by the name indicates something which is very huge and present over a large area. Going by the name, in a technical field, Cloud is something that is virtual and provides services to end-users in the form of storage, hosting of apps or virtualizing any physical space. Nowadays, Cloud computing is used by small as well as large organizations for data storage or providing customers with its advantages which are listed above. Mainly, three types of Services come associated with Cloud which are: SaaS (Software as a Service) for allowing users to access other publically available clouds of large organizations for storing their data like Gmail, PaaS (Platform as a Service) for hosting of apps or software on Others public cloud ex: Google App Engine which hosts apps of users, IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) for virtualizing any physical machine and availing it to customers to make them get feel of a real machine. read more

Programming: JetBrains, Git, Python and Perl

2020-01-17 10:51:20

JetBrains’ New Font (Apparently) Makes Reading Code Easier A new free and open source monospace font has been released by software development powerhouse JetBrains. Their typographic creation is called (surprise) JetBrains Mono and, they claim, it makes reading code much kinder on the eyes. Admittedly it feels a bit like everyone has their own monospace font these days: IBM released ‘Plex’ in 2017; Microsoft has launched ‘Casacida; and even Ubuntu has its own one for when you need to get up close with the command line. But with JetBrains being — apologies in advance, you knew this obvious pun was coming — the brains behind some of the world’s best-loved development and code creation tools, it kinda makes sense for them to have their own one too, doesn’t it? And lo: the creation of JetBrains Mono. 9 Best Free Git Clients Git is an open source distributed version control system which was originally designed by Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, in 2005 for Linux kernel development. This control system is widely used by the open source community, handling small to extremely large projects with an emphasis on speed and efficiency, but maintaining flexibility, scalability, and guaranteeing data integrity. Git is one of a number of open source revision control systems available for Linux. Other popular tools in this field include Subversion, Bazaar, Mercurial, Monotone, CVS, and SVN. However, Git is frequently regarded by many developers to be the finest version control tool available. There are two Git tools that are part of the main Git repository each designed for a different job. Git-gui is a Tcl/Tk-based graphical user interface that concentrates on commit generation and single file annotation. gitk is a repository browser that is also written in Tcl/tk. Whilst these two tools, used in conjunction, offer reasonable access to the power of Git, they lack integration, and functionality that other Git clients provide. The purpose of this article is to provide an insight into the best free open source Git clients that are available. We have covered the best graphical and console based clients available, so hopefully there will be something here of interest for anyone involved in the development of software projects. There are a large number of projects that use Git to aid their development. Notable examples include the Linux kernel, Eclipse, Wine, X.org, Ruby on Rails, ALSA, Bacula, Drupal, FreeRADIUS, Puppet, VLC, and many more. Code a Boulder Dash mining game | Wireframe #30 Learn how to code a simple Boulder Dash homage in Python and Pygame. Mark Vanstone shows you how.  Mocking in Python The first mission is called “Univocalic davasaan” created by Phil15 and here you have to write a function named davasaan which calculates the integer division by 10, and make your code as short as possible. The second one is the “Tree Walker” mission created by quarkov where you are given a tree and a target and your task is to calculate the number of leaves or subtrees that are equal to the target. Python Bytes: #164 Use type hints to build your next CLI app Talk Python to Me: #247 Solo maintainer of open-source in academia Do you run an open-source project? Does it seem like you never have enough time to support it? Have you considered starting one but are unsure you can commit to it? It's a real challenge. On this episode, we welcome back Philip Guo, who has been a solo maintainer of the very popular PythonTutor.com project for over 10 years. He has some non-traditional advice to keep your sanity and keep your project going while holding down a busy full-time job. Shorewall 5.2.3.5 Released! Shorewall 5.2.3.5 is now available for download. Shorewall is a gateway/firewall configuration tool for GNU/Linux, written in Perl. read more

KDE: KPatience and KDE Connect Website

2020-01-17 10:44:56

KPatience added to flathub. Which app should be next? This week we added KPatience to flathub. That makes for a quite a few applications from KDE already in flathub KDE Connect Website SoK 2020 Week 1 It had been great fun working with KDE Community on my SoK 2020 Project that is making a Website to promote KDE Connect. I started early off making the website from December by having a lot of discussion with my mentors Carl Schwan and Piyush Aggarwal, and the KDE Connect Developers. They were all very supportive and provided very constructive feedback. So when the project got accepted last week a lot of the work was already over. My proposal included the more work that is required on the website and taking the website to as much perfection as possible. read more

AlphaFold makes its mark in predicting protein structures

2020-01-17 10:40:01

Players applaud, say words like Whoo, bang plastic knives on the table and enjoy the best weekends with artificial intelligence as the main act, thanks to AI unleashed in games.

11 Best Web Browsers I Discovered for Linux in 2020

2020-01-17 10:20:23

Web Browser is a software that provides an interface to surf the web. With an introduction in around 1991, there development and advancement have advanced many folds till the current stage which we see today. Earlier there used to be mostly text-based sites with few having images and graphical content, hence only text-based browsers sufficed with some of the early browsers being: Lynx, Netscape, and Opera. But, with the advancement of technology to support audio, video, images and even flash content, browsers also need to be that advanced to support such content. This has pushed the advancement of browsers to what we see today. A modern browser requires the support of many software which include: web browser engines like Geeko, Trident, WebKit, KHTML, etc, Rendering engine to render the web site content and display in a proper format. Linux being an open-source community gives freedom to developers across the globe to experiment with features they expect from an ideal browser. read more

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: KDE Plasma 5.18 Beta, Destination Linux, User Error and LHS

2020-01-17 10:16:59

KDE Plasma 5.18 Beta Run Through In this video, we are looking at KDE Plasma 5.18 Beta. Destination Linux 156 - CES 2020, Disaster Recovery Tips, Fallback Safe Distros?, Firefox Topics covered in this episode: openEuler New Firefox 72 Released Linus Say No To ZFS In Kernel New Dell Linux Laptop Nvidia Wakes Up No, But | User Error 83 Context switching, improving Linux conferences, a positive approach to life, what makes us cringe, and more. #ErrorAsk: What's the dumbest idea for an app that you can come up with? LHS Episode #321: The Weekender XL It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you. read more

Boxtron, the Steam Play tool to run games through a native DOSBox on Linux has a new release

2020-01-17 10:14:27

Tags: Open Source, DOSBox, Steam Play, New ReleaseBoxtron is another awesome Steam Play tool! Covered here a few times now, like Proton it enables you to play games on Linux that don't have a Linux build setup on Steam only this is for DOSBox games. Rather than running DOSBox-powered games on Steam through Proton when they don't have a Linux build of it all up, using Boxtron should give a better experience. Today a new release went up with Boxtron 0.5.4 fixing multiple issues including: games that use multiple CD images not starting like The Dame Was Loaded (and probably other FMV titles), they tweaked Retro City Rampage 486 to use "aspect=false", several bugs around parsing user-supplied regex for MIDI synthesiser detection were fixed, they also fixed a bug preventing MIDI port detection if there are no soundfonts installed and there's now several fallback soundfont names for various Linux distributions. Additionally, they have another build of DOSBox Staging up as well. DOSBox Staging is their attempt to improve DOSBox with new features, bug fixes and so on while also getting the patches hopefully accepted upstream to the main DOSBox project. You can download the releases of either Boxtron and DOSBox Staging here on GitHub. Alternatively, they also now have certain packages setup. If you're doing a manual install you can simply download the release archive, extract it and then place it in (make the compatibilitytools.d folder if it doesn't exist): ~/.steam/root/compatibilitytools.d/ Once you reload Steam, Boxtron then shows up as an option to force on a game in the Properties. Article from GamingOnLinux.com

The paints that eat pollutants and heat homes

2020-01-17 10:05:22

Applying a coat of paint on the walls of a house may soon help to heat it, saving energy and reducing CO2 emissions. It could also clean the air that we breathe, breaking down chemicals and pollutants, and eliminating harmful pathogens.

Move over Sonic, Surge has arrived with Open Surge - a game engine and retro platformer

2020-01-17 09:58:48

Tags: Free Game, Platformer, Game Engine, RetroI grew up playing the early Sonic games so Open Surge really speaks to me. A retro Sonic-inspired platformer (that's actually quite polished already) and a game engine for others to create with it. Open Surge is free and open source software (GPL license), so anyone can grab it from GitHub and do whatever they wish. Written from scratch in C, using the cross-platform Allegro programming library. Watch video on YouTube.com The built-in editor is a great idea, when you're on a level simply press F12 and you almost instantly get an editor to change everything about the level. It can be a lot more involved than that though, you can fully mod everything from sounds to sprites and then go even further with their SurgeScript—their specially made scripting language. Could be something fun to get a younger audience into game development, or if you just want to mess around building levels in a Sonic-like platformer this is for you. Find out more on the official site, download the latest release with a Snap. Hat tip to RTheren.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Security and Proprietary Software

2020-01-17 09:48:12

Patch Tuesday, January 2020 Edition As first reported Monday by KrebsOnSecurity, Microsoft addressed a severe bug (CVE-2020-0601) in Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016/19 reported by the NSA that allows an attacker to spoof the digital signature tied to a specific piece of software. Such a weakness could be abused by attackers to make malware appear to be a benign program that was produced and signed by a legitimate software company.                     Was It an Act of War? That’s Merck Cyber Attack’s $1.3 Billion Insurance Question. [iophk: Windows TCO]                                               In all, the attack crippled more than 30,000 laptop and desktop computers at the global drugmaker, as well as 7,500 servers, according to a person familiar with the matter. Sales, manufacturing, and research units were all hit. One researcher told a colleague she’d lost 15 years of work. Near Dellapena’s suburban office, a manufacturing facility that supplies vaccines for the U.S. market had ground to a halt. “For two weeks, there was nothing being done,” Dellapena recalls. “Merck is huge. It seemed crazy that something like this could happen.”                     A Windows 10 Vulnerability Was Used to Rickroll the NSA and Github [iophk: Windows TCO]                                               "What Saleem just demonstrated is: With [a short] script you can generate a cert for any website, and it's fully trusted on IE and Edge with just the default settings for Windows," Kenn White, a researcher and security principal at MongoDB, said. "That's fairly horrifying. It affects VPN gateways, VoIP, basically anything that uses network communications." (I spoke with White before Rashid had demonstrated the attack against Chrome.)                         The flaw involves the way the new versions of Windows check the validity of certificates that use elliptic-curve cryptography. While the vulnerable Windows versions check three ECC parameters, they fail to verify a fourth, crucial one, which is known as a base point generator and is often represented in algorithms as G. This failure is a result of Microsoft's implementation of ECC rather than any flaw or weakness in the ECC algorithms themselves. VirtaMove Announces Beta Version V-Migrate for Linux Container Migrations The new release of VirtaMove’s award-winning application migration product V-Migrate for Linux now moves legacy Red Hat and other Linux application infrastructure forward with a stateful re-install of applications into a container. You can now easily move legacy applications from Red Hat Enterprise Linux RHEL 5 and 6 to new Linux Docker containers on modern Linux releases and even run those containers on Microsoft Windows Server 2019. V-Migrate for Linux software automatically moves Linux-based applications from older to newer operating systems, on modern in-house servers or on hybrid or public cloud environments, including Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS clouds. RHEL 6 reaches End of Maintenance Support 2 on November 30, 2020. On January 14, 2020, Microsoft ended all support for Windows Server 2008 R2. read more

Debian Xfce vs Gnome

2020-01-17 09:43:24

XFCE is a light desktop environment compatible with low resource systems while keeping a nice visual interface and effects like screen rotation and transparency. Xfce is extremely user friendly and it is a lot more user friendly than new GNOME versions for PC users without touch screen. read more

Google plan over 120 Stadia games this year, 10 coming to Stadia before other platforms

2020-01-17 09:29:16

Tags: Google, Stadia, Game StreamingIn their latest community update, the Stadia Team have given a small insight into what's coming to the Linux-powered game streaming service Stadia across 2020. Missed our first impressions of Stadia? Check them out here. They said "more than" 120 games will be coming to Stadia this year, more interestingly though they also mentioned that 10 will be arriving in the "first half of this year" that will be on "only" be on Stadia when they launch. So that's presumably some timed-exclusives they have going. No names were mentioned, so we just have to wait and see. 120 doesn't sound like a lot, when compared with how many launch per month on Steam but the difference here of course is how Google will be curating the selection to pull in big titles. Over the next three months they will also be rolling out 4K support in the web browser, more Google Assistant features in the web browser, more Android phone support and finally wireless gameplay on the web browser with the official Stadia Controller. Personally, I think unless Google will be rolling out Stadia Base soon the whole timed-exclusive thing doesn't make sense. What's Stadia Base? It's what everyone who doesn't pay for Stadia Pro will get, it's limited to 1080p but anyone can register an account and buy/play games at that point. So why pay for developers to release on Stadia first, when only people who purchase the Founder/Premier bundle can access? Since they mentioned the features coming in the next few months, I would expect Stadia Base to launch before the end of March to coincide with it working across a wider availability of devices. Additionally, Tequila Works who developed the Stadia-exclusive Gylt spoke to GamesIndustry.biz and they sound quite positive about their experience working with Google. They went so far as to say Gylt had the "smoothest production for a Tequila Works game ever.". They also mentioned "a few features that are going to blow people's minds" when they launch on Stadia at some point.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Google parent Alphabet valuation hit $1 trillion

2020-01-17 08:49:19

Google's parent company Alphabet saw its value reach $1 trillion for the first time Thursday, becoming the fourth US tech company to hit the milestone.

US tech sector sees only modest relief in China trade deal

2020-01-17 08:45:53

The US tech sector is getting some relief from a trade truce with China signed this week, but the deal leaves many of the industry's concerns unresolved.

Vodafone India's shares plunge almost 40%, future in doubt

2020-01-17 08:44:51

Shares in Vodafone's Indian unit plunged almost 40 percent on Friday after officials rejected its appeal against paying $4 billion in back fees, raising questions about the British giant's future in the country.

Get started with this open source to-do list manager

2020-01-17 08:02:00

Last year, I brought you 19 days of new (to you) productivity tools for 2019. This year, I'm taking a different approach: building an environment that will allow you to be more productive in the new year, using tools you may or may not already be using. read more

Use this Python script to find bugs in your Overcloud

2020-01-17 08:01:00

OpenStack stores and manages a bunch of log files on its Overcloud nodes and Undercloud host. Therefore, it's not easy to use OSP log files to investigate a problem you're having, especially when you don't even know what could have caused the problem. read more

C vs. Rust: Which to choose for programming hardware abstractions

2020-01-17 08:00:00

Rust is an increasingly popular programming language positioned to be the best choice for hardware interfaces. It's often compared to C for its level of abstraction. This article explains how Rust can handle bitwise operations in a number of ways and offers a solution that provides both safety and ease of use. read more

Benchmarks Of Arch Linux's Zen Kernel Flavor

2020-01-17 06:09:22

Following the recent Linux kernel tests of Liquorix and other scheduler discussions (and more), some requests from premium supporters rolled in for seeing the performance of Arch Linux's Zen kernel package against the generic kernel. Here are those benchmark results...

Rav1e Kicks Off 2020 With Speed Improvements For Rust-Based AV1 Encoding

2020-01-17 05:00:12

Xiph.org's Rustlang-written "Rav1e" AV1 video encoder is back on track with delivering weekly pre-releases after missing them over the past month due to the holidays. With Rav1e p20200115 are not only performance improvements but also binary side and build speed enhancements...

Basic Bash Commands for Linux Newbies

2020-01-17 02:20:25

While bash is fast and powerful, it's also difficult for beginners to pick up. Here are some basic bash commands that all new users should know.

How to use rsync command to copy data locally and over SSH

2020-01-17 01:18:53

In this article, we will explain how to use rsync for copying data in Linux. We will use Debian 10 for describing the procedure mentioned in this article.

Can You Live Without These Five Companies That Rule Your Life?

2020-01-17 00:54:04

Want to get a PC that’s not a Mac or a Windows machine? Well, you’ve got to try using one that runs on Ubuntu or Linux, but it’s not everyone’s cup of tea. Similarly, good luck trying to get around using Word, Excel and Powerpoint like apps without cozying up to Apple or Google for that. read more

GNU Mes 0.17 released

2020-01-17 00:50:09

We are delighted to announce the release of GNU Mes 0.17, representing 64 commits over 6 weeks. Mes is now an official GNU package and we have bootstrapped gcc-4.7.4 for x86-linux with a reduced binary seed (i.e., without regular toolchain). Next targets: - upstream the x86 Mes bootstrap to GuixSD - create a x86_64 Mes C Lib, see if that is is enough to bootstrap x86_64 - reduce the 1MB ASCII M1 seed to ~5000 LOC/~100KB of M2 source - create a plan for Geesh and Gash and use them to reduce the bootstrap binary dependencies - and/or otherwise reduce the bootstrap binary dependencies Packages are available from Guix's wip-bootstrap branch. * About GNU Mes[0] aims to help create full source bootstrapping for GNU/Linux distributions such as GuixSD[1] as part of the bootstrappable builds[2] effort. It consists of a mutual self-hosting Scheme interpreter written in ~5,000 LOC of simple C and a Nyacc-based C compiler written in Scheme. This mes.c is being simplified[3] to be transpiled by M2-Planet[4]. The Scheme interpreter (mes.c) has a Garbage Collector, a library of loadable Scheme modules-- notably Dominique Boucher's LALR[5], Pre-R6RS portable syntax-case[6] with R7RS ellipsis, Matt Wette's Nyacc[7] --and test suite just barely enough to support a simple REPL and simple C-compiler: MesCC. Mes+MesCC can compile an only lightly patched TinyCC[8] that is self-hosting. Using this tcc and the Mes C library we now have a reduced-binary-seed bootstrap for the gnutools triplet: glibc-2.2.5, binutils-2.20.1, gcc-4.7.4. Mes is inspired by The Maxwell Equations of Software: LISP-1.5[9] -- John McCarthy page 13, GNU Guix's source/binary packaging transparency and Jeremiah Orians's stage0[10] ~500 byte self-hosting hex assembler. Also: Mes Becomes An Official GNU Project, Mes 0.17 Released To Bootstrap GNU/Linux Distros read more

Red Hat Recommends Disabling The Intel Linux Graphics Driver Over Hardware Flaw

2020-01-17 00:47:42

It's been another day testing and investigating CVE-2019-14615, a.k.a. the Intel graphics hardware issue where for Gen9 all turned out to be okay but for Gen7 graphics leads to some big performance hits. Besides the Core i7 tests published yesterday in the aforelinked article, tests on relevant Core i3 and i5 CPUs are currently being carried out for seeing the impact there (so far, it's looking to be equally brutal)...

JetBrains’ New Font (Apparently) Makes Reading Code Easier

2020-01-17 00:31:31

A new free and open source monospace font has been released by software development powerhouse JetBrains. Their typographic creation is called (surprise) JetBrains Mono and, they claim, it makes reading code much kinder on the […] This post, JetBrains’ New Font (Apparently) Makes Reading Code Easier, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Devices/Embedded/Gadgets/Hardware With GNU/Linux

2020-01-17 00:22:25

Cloud-based test farm lets you check out edge AI software on Linux dev boards FØCAL is a profiling and automated test farm platform based on Docker and LTTng for testing Linux edge AI software on the BeagleBone, Raspberry Pi, Jetson, Up Squared, and Google Coral. A venture-backed startup called FØCAL has launched a cloud-based test farm of the same name designed for hardware/software codesign of Linux-based edge AI and computer vision applications. The test farm offers testing on common Linux hacker boards for a flat price of $0.10 an hour Slim-height Whiskey Lake embedded PC doubles as panel PC Cincoze’s rugged “P2102” computer has an 8th Gen U-series CPU with up to 64GB DDR4, triple displays, 2x SATA, 2x GbE, 3x USB 3.2 Gen2, 2x mini-PCIe, and M.2 plus support for optional touchscreen modules. A P2102E model adds PCI/PCIe x4 and optional PoE. Cincoze announced a P2100 Series of rugged, industrial computers starting with P2102 and P2102E models that run on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake UE SoCs with 15W TDPs. The company refers to the 254.5 x 190 x 41.5mm, 2.2 kg P2102 and PCI/PCIe x4 enabled, 254.5 x 190 x 61mm, 2.7 kg P2102E as mini-PCs, but we would call them fanless, compact industrial computers. Krescue for Khadas VIM Boards Enables Backup/Restore of eMMC flash, Access to the Terminal, and More Snekboard Controls LEGO Power Functions with CircuitPython or Snek Programming Languages (Crowdfunding) NanoPi R2S Dual Gigabit Ethernet SBC & Router is Powered by Rockchip RK3328 SoC FriendlyElec launched NanoPi R1S router with two Ethernet ports based on either Allwinner H3 or H5 processor coupled with 512MB RAM last November. read more

Destination Linux 156 - CES 2020, Disaster Recovery Tips, Fallback Safe Distros?, Firefox

2020-01-17 00:17:21

openEuler, New Firefox 72 Released, Linus Say No To ZFS In Kernel, New Dell Linux Laptop, Nvidia Wakes Up

The 15 Best Physics Tools for Linux System in 2020

2020-01-17 00:16:59

There are different types of applications of Linux physics software in the study and research of theoretical and applied physics. So, it’s very difficult to call a single piece of software the best. Here we have enlisted a collection of 15 best Physics tools for Linux. Some of them are for analyzing data, some for numerical applications, some for simulation, and even some will help you in programming the solution of different physics-related problems. We are certain that no matter what your requirement is, you are going to love this curated collection of Linux physics software. read more

Mir 1.7 Released With Improvements For Running X11 Software

2020-01-16 23:54:50

Mir 1.7 was released today as the newest feature release for this Ubuntu-focused display stack that for the past two years now has focused on serving viable Wayland support...

PaperWM: tiled window management for GNOME

2020-01-16 23:34:46

When I started using Linux on my personal computer, one of the first things I got excited about was tiny lightweight window managers, largely because my laptop at the time had 32MB of RAM and anything else was unusable. Then I got into tiling window managers like xmonad! I could manage my windows with my keyboard! They were so fast! I could configure xmonad by writing a Haskell program! I could customize everything in all kinds of fun ways (like using dmenu as a launcher)! I used 3 or 4 different tiling window managers over the years and it was fun. About 6 years ago I decided configuring my tiling window manager wasn’t fun for me anymore and switched to using the Ubuntu stock desktop environment: Gnome. (which is much faster now that I have 500x more RAM in my laptop ) So I’ve been using Gnome for a long time, but I still kind of missed tiling window managers. Then 6 months ago a friend told me about PaperWM, which lets you tile your windows in Gnome! I installed it immediately and I’ve been using it ever since. Also: Alberto Ruiz: GTK: OSX a11y support read more

Audiocasts/Show: Linux Headlines, TLLTS, Self-Hosted and BSD Now

2020-01-16 22:58:31

2020-01-16 | Linux Headlines Mozilla faces difficult choices after a major layoff, a new release of PyTorch adds long-awaited Java support, GNU Guile sees a significant speedup, and the LLVM community debates the future of decision making for the project. The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 840 nest, home, dan horror story Compromised Cameras | Self-Hosted 10 Wyze and Xiaomi suffer major cloud hosted blunders, so Alex tells us about his new fully offline camera secuirty system, tied into Shinobi. Plus Chris gets ready for Project Off-Grid’s solar upgrade, our new favorite self-hosted SpeedTest app, and a Ring alternative. Unix keyboard joy | BSD Now 333 Your Impact on FreeBSD in 2019, Wireguard on OpenBSD Router, Amazon now has FreeBSD/ARM 12, pkgsrc-2019Q4, The Joys of UNIX Keyboards, OpenBSD on Digital Ocean, and more. read more

With International Tensions Flaring, Cyber Risk is Heating Up for All Businesses

2020-01-16 22:55:00

Risks of nation-state attacks go beyond Iran, and the need for awareness and security don't stop at any national border.

Programming: Rust, LLVM, COBOL and More

2020-01-16 22:45:31

This Week in Rust 321 Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started! LLVM Developers Discuss Improved Decision Making Process LLVM project founder Chris Lattner has proposed a new decision making process for the LLVM compiler stack around new sub-project proposals, new social policies, changes to core infrastructure, and other key changes. Lattner is proposing a process similar to the Swift language's Evolution Process (to which Lattner has been involved with Swift), Rust's RFC process, Python PEP, and other similar processes for different programming languages. The motivation is to provide clearer steps for developers wishing to propose effectively fundamental changes to the project with no code owners. And, yes, there still is the LLVM Foundation for more project related matters where as the process changes here are technical focused. LLVM 10 Adds Option To Help Offset Intel JCC Microcode Performance Impact Disclosed back in November was the Intel Jump Conditional Code Erratum that necessitated updated CPU microcode to mitigate and with that came with a nearly across the board performance impact. But Intel developers had been working on assembler patches for helping to reduce that performance hit. The GNU Assembler patches were merged back in December while now ahead of LLVM 10.0 that alternative toolchain has an option for helping to recover some of the lost performance. On the GNU side the exposed option is "-mbranches-within-32B-boundaries" for altering the handling of jump instructions to aide in reducing the performance hit from the Intel CPU microcode update for Skylake through Cascadelake. (More details in the original JCC article, which includes early benchmarks of the JCC impact and of the mitigated support that has been available within Intel's Clear Linux since the disclosure date.) RcppRedis 0.1.10: Switch to tinytest Another minor release of RcppRedis just arrived on CRAN, following a fairly long break since the last release in October 2018. RcppRedis is one of several packages connecting R to the fabulous Redis in-memory datastructure store (and much more). RcppRedis does not pretend to be feature complete, but it may do some things faster than the other interfaces, and also offers an optional coupling with MessagePack binary (de)serialization via RcppMsgPack. The package has carried production loads for several years now. This release switches to the fabulous tinytest package, allowing for very flexible testing during development and deployment—three cheers for easily testing installed packages too. Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn COBOL COBOL is an acronym which stands for Common Business-Oriented Language. The US Department of Defense, in a conference, formed CODASYL (Conference on Data Systems Language) to develop a language for meeting business data processing needs which is now known as COBOL. COBOL is a standard language that can be compiled and executed on various machines. It’s ideally suited for business-oriented applications as it can handle huge volumes of data. It provides numerous debugging and testing tools. COBOL is a structured language; it has different divisions, so it’s easy to debug. The language is not designed for writing systems programs. COBOL is one of the oldest computer languages. Perl Weekly Challenge - 043 Automating Helm deployments with Bash Some of our applications are hosted in a Kubernetes cluster, and we use GitLab Continuous Integration (CI) to automate deployments and Helm 2 to deploy our applications. Helm charts enable the storage of templates of Kubernetes object YAML files with variables that can be programmatically set from command-line arguments passed when the chart is used during deployments. This allows us to store critical secrets in GitLab-protected environment variables or in Hashicorp Vault and use them within the CI deployment job. [...] The script performs all tasks required to deploy a Helm chart for an application to Kubernetes and waits for the deployment to be ready using kubectl and Helm. Helm runs with a local Tiller installation instead of running Tiller in the Kubernetes cluster. The Kubernetes HELM_USER and HELM_PASSWORD are used to log into the Kubernetes CLUSTER_SERVER and PROJECT_NAMESPACE. Tiller is started, Helm is initialized in client-only mode, and its repo is updated. The template is linted with Helm to ensure that syntax errors have not been accidentally committed. The template is then deployed in declarative mode, using helm upgrade --install. Helm waits for the deployment to be ready using the --wait flag. Niko Matsakis: Async Interview #4: Florian Gilcher Hello! For the latest async interview, I spoke with Florian Gilcher (skade). Florian is involved in the async-std project, but he’s also one of the founders of Ferrous Systems, a Rust consulting firm that also does a lot of trainings. In that capacity, he’s been teaching people to use async Rust now since Rust’s 1.0 release. [...] We discussed the futures crate for a while. In particular, the question of whether we should be “stabilizing” traits by moving them into the standard library, or whether we can use the futures crate as a “semi-stable” home. There are obviously advantages either way. On the one hand, there is no clearer signal for stability than adding something to libstd. On the other, the future crate facade gives a “finer grained” ability to talk about semver. One thing Florian noted is that the futures crate itself, although it has evolved a lot, has always maintained an internal consistency, which is good. One other point Florian emphasized is that people really want to be building applications, so in some way the most important thing is to be moving towards stability, so they can avoid worrying about the sand shifting under their feet. Protect your veggies from hail with a Raspberry Pi Zero W Tired of losing vegetable crops to frequent summertime hail storms, Nick Rogness decided to build something to protect them. And the result is brilliant! read more

Welcoming the new Board of Directors at The Document Foundation

2020-01-16 22:38:16

In December, members of The Document Foundation voted for a new Board of Directors. The Board is the main administration of the Foundation’s projects and teams – including LibreOffice and The Document Foundation. The new Board will begin work after FOSDEM in February – and there are some new faces to welcome! Let’s hear from them… Also: Image Compression read more

New Attack Campaigns Suggest Emotet Threat Is Far From Over

2020-01-16 22:30:00

Malware described by the DHS as among the worst ever continues to evolve and grow, researchers from Cisco Talos, Cofense, and Check Point Software say.

PinePhone Linux Smartphone Shipment Finally Begins

2020-01-16 22:30:00

Pine64 will finally start shipping the pre-order units of PinePhone Braveheart Edition on January 17, 2020. Fossbytes reports: A year ago, PinePhone was made available only to developers and hackers. After getting better responses and suggestions, the Pine64 developers planned to bring Pinephone for everyone. In November last year, pre-orders for PinePhone Braveheart Edition commenced for everyone. But due to manufacturing issues coming in the way, the shipment date slipped for weeks, which was scheduled in December last year. PinePhone Braveheart Edition is an affordable, open source Linux-based operating system smartphone preloaded with factory test image running on Linux OS (postmarketOS) on inbuilt storage. You can check on PinePhone Wiki to find the PinePhone compatible operating system such as Ubuntu Touch, postmarketOS, or Sailfish OS, which you can boot either from internal storage or an SD card. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Red Hat: 'Cloud', 'Study', Hoodies and OpenShift

2020-01-16 22:20:25

Crafting a future-proof application environment across the hybrid cloud Modern information technology (IT) success requires the right investment in infrastructure and tooling. Beyond the tooling, however, the real benchmark for accomplishment lies in the successful development, deployment and operation of applications that power an organization. Ultimately the applications are what drive value to customers, partners and employees. The challenge for IT becomes how to combine available technologies to empower development teams to do their work and successfully operate the resulting applications. Thinking of the overall organizational IT capacity as an application environment that spans the various cloud locations, on-premises resources and technologies deployed seems daunting. However, it provides a very useful lens through which to look at long term IT strategy. The Red Hat Edge: How Red Hat OpenStack Platforms Delivers the Potential for Nearly 600 Percent ROI To conduct this study, IDC interviewed eight organizations asking survey respondents a mix of quantitative and qualitative questions about the impact that Red Hat OpenStack Platform has had on their IT operations, businesses and cost of deploying private cloud services. Interviewees encompassed the financial services, manufacturing, financial technology, information technology, medical research, automotive, education and healthcare sectors. Red Hat Summit 2020 flash sale: get your hoodie before it's gone! Planning to go to Red Hat Summit this year? You don't want to miss the industry's premier enterprise open source technology conference, and it's coming up fast! We've got an added incentive for you to sign up today, until end of day January 23 or we run out, we're giving a special bonus to folks who register for Red Hat Summit. Through January 23rd or until we've moved through our limited quantity (whichever comes first), those who register for Red Hat Summit will get an exclusive Red Hat Summit hoodie with their Summit registration. We expect these to go fast, so don't hesitate to register today and take advantage of the flash sale to get Early Bird Red Hat Summit pricing and a little something extra. OpenShift Container Storage 4: Introduction to Ceph This Blog will go through Ceph fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of the underlying storage solution used by Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4. New and improved Topology view for OpenShift 4.3 The Topology view in the Red Hat OpenShift console’s Developer perspective is a thoughtfully designed interface that provides a visual representation of an application’s structure. This view helps developers clearly identify one resource type from another, as well as understand the overall communication dynamics within the application. Launched with the 4.2 release of OpenShift, the Topology view has already earned a spotlight in the cloud-native application development arena. The constant feedback cycles and regular follow-ups on the ongoing trends in the developer community have helped to shape up a great experience in the upcoming release. This article focuses on a few showstopper features in the Topology view that were added for OpenShift 4.3. read more

How to change timezone in Linux

2020-01-16 22:14:17

When we install any Linux distribution, we can provide a timezone & time will be served based on that timezone. But we can also change the timezone once we have installed the operating system. In this tutorial, we…

Software: broot, VokoscreenNG, Kubic with Kubernetes

2020-01-16 22:11:25

broot Is An Interactive Treeview Directory Navigation Tool For The Command Line broot is an interactive command line tool written in Rust for navigating directories using a tree view and fuzzy search. It also incorporates a ncdu like disk usage mode. The tool is inspired by the tree command (which is not interactively searchable though, and doesn't act as a launcher) and the excellent fzf command line fuzzy finder, allowing users to navigate to a directory and locate a particular file with the minimum amount of keystrokes. It runs on Linux, macOS and Windows. There are some rough edges on Windows though - some things need fixing, and it's quite slow on Windows for now. It works great and it's very fast on Linux though (and I assume macOS, although I don't own a Mac so I didn't try it). VokoscreenNG – Vokoscreen Screencaster Rewritten From Scratch VokoscreenNG, open-source screen recording software formerly called Vokoscreen, released its first stable version days ago. Vokoscreen 2.5 is the last version with ffmpeg and will not more continue developed. The new VokoscreenNG, which is based of Qt and GStreamer, has been rewritten from scratch with new modern UI. And it works on Linux and Windows. VokoscreenNG so far does not provide any binary packages, though Linux binary Appimage and Flatpak package were requested. At the moment, you can build the software from the source. Kubic with Kubernetes 1.17.0 released The Kubic Project is proud to announce that Snapshot 20200113 has just been released containing Kubernetes 1.17.0. This is a particually exciting release with Cloud Provider Labels becoming a GA-status feature, and Volume Snapshotting now reaching Beta-status. read more

Arch Adopting Zstandard and More

2020-01-16 22:03:35

Now using Zstandard instead of xz for package compression zstd and xz trade blows in their compression ratio. Recompressing all packages to zstd with their options yields a total ~0.8% increase in package size on all of their packages combined, but the decompression time for all packages saw a ~1300% speedup. We already have hundreds of zstd-compressed packages in our repositories, and as packages get updated more will keep rolling in. No user-facing issues have been found as of yet, so things appear to be working. Everything you need to know about pacman rsync compatibility Our rsync package was shipped with bundled zlib to provide compatibility with the old-style --compress option up to version 3.1.0. Version 3.1.1 was released on 2014-06-22 and is shipped by all major distributions now. So we decided to finally drop the bundled library and ship a package with system zlib. This also fixes security issues, actual ones and in future. Go and blame those running old versions if you encounter errors with rsync 3.1.3-3. read more

Security: NSA, NSO, FCC's Lifeline, GNU/Linux/FOSS Updates and Linux 5.6 Crypto Getting AVX/AVX2/AVX-512 Optimized Poly1305

2020-01-16 21:15:45

Microsoft, NSA confirm killer Windows 10 bug, but a patch is available The flaw, CVE-2020-0601, was found in the usermode cryptographic library, CRYPT32.DLL, that affects Windows 10 systems. (Contrary to earlier rumors, it does not affect Windows 7, which coincidentally is being shut down Tuesday as well.) Fortunately, Microsoft reported that the library was not in active use, though that doesn’t prevent an attacker from weaponizing it now that it’s been disclosed. Specifically, the attack could allow malware to hide behind a spoofed cyrptographic signature. Antivirus software could therefore identify malware as legitimate applications, or fake banking sites could use the vulnerability to trick a user’s PC into thinking it was legitimate. Malware Marketer NSO Group Looks Like It's Blowing Off Facebook's Lawsuit In late October of last year, Facebook and WhatsApp sued Israeli surveillance tech provider NSO Group for using WhatsApp to deliver device-compromising malware. The lawsuit sought to use the CFAA to stop NSO from using WhatsApp as an attack vector. Some FCC Subsidized Low Income Phones Are A Chinese Malware Shitshow We've long talked about the problems with the FCC's Lifeline program, which was created by Reagan and expanded by Bush Junior (yet somehow earned the nickname "Obamaphone"). The $2 billion program doles out a measly $9.25 per month subsidy that low-income homes can use to help pay a tiny fraction of their wireless, phone, or broadband bills (enrolled participants have to choose one). But for years, the FCC has struggled to police fraud within the program, with big and small carriers alike frequently caught "accidentally" getting millions in taxpayer dollars they didn't deserve. Security updates for Thursday Security updates have been issued by Debian (debian-lan-config and phpmyadmin), openSUSE (openssl-1_1), Oracle (firefox and kernel), Red Hat (.NET Core, git, java-11-openjdk, and thunderbird), SUSE (Mesa, python3, shibboleth-sp, slurm, and tigervnc), and Ubuntu (libpcap and nginx). Linux 5.6 Crypto Getting AVX/AVX2/AVX-512 Optimized Poly1305 - Helps WireGuard Now that lead WireGuard lead developer Jason Donenfeld has managed to get this secure VPN tunnel technology queued for introduction in Linux 5.6 mainline, he's begun optimizing other areas of the kernel for optimal WireGuard performance. Poly1305 is used by WireGuard for the message authentication code and that's the latest bit being optimized in mainline to not only benefit WireGuard but other crypto users as well. Donenfeld has provided x86_64 vectorized implementations of Poly1305 for AVX, AVX-2, and AVX-512F. These AVX/AVX2/AVX-512 optimized versions are proving to be clearly faster -- though with AVX-512 is only enabled for Cannonlake/Icelake and newer as for Skylake the AVX-512 down-clocking is causing the performance to come up short. read more

elementary OS: 2019 in Review

2020-01-16 21:13:18

Our 2019 in Review 2019 was an intense and record-breaking year for us at elementary. You can read about the monthly updates in detail, but let’s take a look back at milestones from the year—and then look forward to our goals for 2020. elementary OS 6 Will Be Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) The elementary OS team is kicking off 2020 with a retrospective of the things they managed to do in 2019 and a set of goals for the year ahead as they want to further improve their Linux-based operating system. In a recent blog post, elementary co-founder Cassidy James Blaede talks about an "intense and record-breaking" 2019 and also highlights some of the major goals for 2020 while also revealing the fact that work on the next major release, elementary OS 6, is on the way and it will be based on the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system. "Ubuntu 20.04 LTS will be coming out this year, and subsequently we plan to release elementary OS 6 with a 20.04 base. We've begun some of the underlying work to migrate to and build against newer libraries, but much of that work still lies ahead," said Cassidy James Blaede, Co-founder & CXO of elementary. read more

Linux / Unix Rsync Copy Hidden Dot Files and Directories Only

2020-01-16 20:40:00

Add a new user account with admin access on Linux

2020-01-16 20:35:29

Austria fails to win over neighbours for nuclear phase-out

2020-01-16 20:32:36

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz, on his first trip abroad Thursday since being re-elected, failed to persuade the governments of four central European countries to give up on nuclear energy which they largely depend on.

'PigeonBot' brings aircraft closer to feathered-flight

2020-01-16 20:32:05

Since the dawn of the aviation era, inventors have strived to build aircraft that fly as nimbly as birds, whose morphable wings allow for faster, tighter turns and more efficient gliding.

Google Killing Things (Chrome Cookies and Chrome Apps)

2020-01-16 20:03:39

Google to kill third-party Chrome cookies in two years So it’ll slowly squish third-party cookies, but only after it’s found alternatives. What does that squishing look like, and what are those alternatives? The company already announced that it would limit third-party cookies to HTTPS connections, which will make them more secure. It plans to start doing that next month. It will also treat cookies that don’t use the SameSite label as first-party only. SameSite is a tag that developers can include with cookies. It sets the rules for exchanging the cookie with other sites. A bank could use it to avoid sending session cookies to another site that links to a customer’s transaction page, for example, so that a third party couldn’t harvest session information. So in future, developers have to be upfront about how third-party cookies will work, or Chrome won’t send them between sites at all. Chrome's Move To Stomp Out Third Party Cookies? Good For Privacy, Good For Google's Ad Business... Or Both? We've talked in the past how efforts solely focused on "protecting privacy" without looking at the wider tech ecosystem and the challenges its facing may result in unintended consequences, and now we've got another example. Google has announced that it's beginning a process to phase out support for third-party cookies in Chrome. Looking at this solely through the lens of privacy, many privacy advocates are celebrating this move, saying that it will better protect user privacy. But... if you viewed it from a more competitive standpoint, it also does much to give Google significantly more power over the ad market and could harm many other companies. Former Facebook CSO, Alex Stamos' take is pretty dead on here: Windows 10 users: Google reveals when it's killing off Chrome apps Chrome apps that work offline for Windows, Mac, and Linux have been around since 2013, but Google has now committed firm dates for switching off support for them. Google sets final timeline for killing and replacing Chrome Apps Back in 2016, Google announced that it was killing Chrome Apps in favor of the web. This process began with that category disappearing from the Web Store in late 2017, and Google now has a final timeline for the deprecation. Chrome Apps launched in 2013 to a different state of the web. “Packaged Apps” were built with HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript to offer an “experience comparable to a native application.” They were touted as allowing for a wider user base than just one OS, and targeted towards device manufacturers and educators. Citing “substantial progress” since then, Google believes that “modern browsers puts the Web in a good position to answer the vast majority of use cases.” Touted first-class experiences include Google Earth and Figma for designers, as well as Progressive Web Apps. read more

Linux tools: du vs. df

2020-01-16 20:00:00

Explore the difference between the du and df commands, and which of them is best for which use cases.

Kubuntu Focus Laptop is Now Ready for Pre-Order

2020-01-16 19:58:10

If you’ve ever wanted a KDE-specific, Linux-powered laptop, now’s your chance.

The Humble Australia Fire Relief Bundle is up with 100% going to charity

2020-01-16 19:34:11

Tags: Game Bundle, Humble Store, CharityHumble are back with a new bundle, although this is a 100% charity bundle to help deal with the sad situation in Australia. The Humble Australia Fire Relief Bundle only has one tier at $25, which does include quite a lot of games. Here's what's included, I've highlighted in bold text those with Linux support: Armello Assault Android Cactus+ Crawl Euro Truck Simulator 2 + Australian Paint Jobs Pack FRAMED Collection Hacknet + Hacknet Labyrinths DLC Hand of Fate 2 Hollow Knight Machinarium Mr. Shifty Paradigm Quest of Dungeons Regular Human Basketball Satellite Reign The Gardens Between Tower of Guns Death Squared Duck Game Feather Masquerade: The Baubles of Doom PAPER FIRE ROOKIE Paperbark Primal Carnage: Extinction Rising Dusk The Adventure Pals The Haunted Island, a Frog Detective Game The Stillness of the Wind Think of the Children Void Bastards Check out the bundle here, while we get no cut from it like other Humble stuff it's something I'm obviously happy to support, it's absolutely crazy the devastation that's been happening. 100% of the proceeds go to charities including the RSPCA, WIRES and World Wildlife Fund. That's a pretty big collection of games, so hopefully plenty of people will throw their support to it. Fantastic to see so many different developers jump in. Crytivo are also giving some of their revenue to charity too, see info on that in the previous article.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Google Will Wind Down Chrome Apps Starting in June

2020-01-16 19:30:00

Google said this week that it will begin to phase out traditional Chrome apps starting in June, and winding down slowly over two years' time. Chrome extensions, though, will live on. From a report: Google said Tuesday in a blog post that it would stop accepting new Chrome apps in March. Existing apps could continue to be developed through June, 2022. The important dates start in June of this year, when Google will end support for Chrome Apps on the Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. Education and Enterprise customers on these platforms will get a little more time to get their affairs in order, until December, 2020. Google had actually said four years ago that it would phase out Chrome apps on Windows, Mac, and Linux in 2018. The company appears to have waited longer than announced before beginning this process. The other platform that's affected by this, of course, is Google's own Chrome OS and Chromebooks, for which the apps were originally developed. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Nanoparticle levitated by light rotates at 300 billion rpm

2020-01-16 19:03:41

A dumbbell-shaped nanoparticle powered just by the force and torque of light has become the world's fastest-spinning object.

Phishing Today, Deepfakes Tomorrow: Training Employees to Spot This Emerging Threat

2020-01-16 19:00:00

Cybercriminals are evolving their tactics, and the security community anticipates voice and video fraud to play a role in one of the next big data breaches -- so start protecting your business now.

How to Install DokuWiki with Nginx and Let's encrypt SSL on Debian 10

2020-01-16 18:56:53

DokuWiki is a simple to use and highly versatile Open Source wiki software that doesn't require a database. It is loved by users for its clean and readable syntax. This tutorial will show you how to install DokuWiki on a fresh Debian 10 (buster) server.

Ryzen CPUs On Linux Finally See CCD Temperatures, Current + Voltage Reporting

2020-01-16 18:39:12

One of the few frustrations with the AMD Ryzen CPU support on Linux to date has been besides the often delayed support for CPU temperature reporting has been the mainline kernel not supporting voltage readings and other extra sensors. But that is finally changing with the "k10temp" driver being extended to include current and voltage reporting plus CCD temperature reporting on Zen 2 processors...

Authentication Bypass Vulnerability in InfiniteWP Client

2020-01-16 18:16:42

An authentication bypass vulnerability affecting more than 300,000 InfiniteWP Client plugin users has recently been disclosed to the public. This plugin allows site owners to manage multiple websites from one central server using the InfiniteWP Server. Due to the nature of this plugin, this is a serious vulnerability that should be patched as soon as possible to mitigate risk. InfiniteWP users can update their plugin with the latest version 1.9.4.5. Continue reading Authentication Bypass Vulnerability in InfiniteWP Client <= 1.9.4.4  at Sucuri Blog.

Broadening the Scope: A Comprehensive View of Pen Testing

2020-01-16 18:07:24

Penetration tests have long been known as a critical security tool that exposes security weaknesses through simulated attacks on an organization's IT environments. These test results can help prioritize weaknesses, providing a road-map towards remediation. However, the results are also capable of doing even more. They identify and quantify security risk, and can be used as a keystone in

Retooled CentOS Build Scripts To Help Spin New Releases Quicker, More Automation

2020-01-16 18:05:06

The release of CentOS 8 came several months after RHEL 8.0 and this week's release of CentOS updated against RHEL 8.1 took over two months of work. But moving forward to RHEL 8.2 and beyond, that turnaround time will hopefully be less...

Britain's green energy sector brightens: survey data

2020-01-16 18:02:30

Green energy has boomed in Britain over the last three years, according to survey data published Thursday which also highlighted accelerating investment in wind power.

CISO Resigns From Pete Buttigieg Presidential Campaign

2020-01-16 18:00:00

The only Democratic campaign known to have a CISO loses Mick Baccio due to a "fundamental philosophical difference with campaign management."

Group finds US aircraft approval process effective and safe

2020-01-16 17:59:44

A government committee reviewing how the Federal Aviation Administration certifies new passenger planes for flight has determined that the system is safe and effective but small changes need to be made.

European carmakers build out charging network for electrics

2020-01-16 17:59:28

European automakers' network of highway charging stations for battery-powered vehicles is taking shape ahead of an expected surge in electric car sales as manufacturers strive to meet new emission limits.

NBC to give price, details on new Peacock streaming service

2020-01-16 17:59:12

NBCUniversal is expected Thursday to unveil the price and other details of its upcoming streaming service, Peacock.

Microsoft: 'carbon-negative' by 2030 even for supply chain

2020-01-16 17:58:21

Microsoft is pledging to become 100% "carbon-negative" by 2030 by removing more carbon from the environment than it emits.

VW has 'one shot' to survive shift to digital era: CEO

2020-01-16 17:57:55

Volkswagen needs to make urgent changes to become more of a tech company as the industry enters the digital era, CEO Herbert Diess said Thursday, warning that the German car giant had just "one shot" at staying in the game.

How to configure a SIP endpoint for intra-office calling

2020-01-16 17:42:33

Learn how to connect Linphone to Asterisk and to make sure that it works.

Xfce 4.16 is Adopting Client Side Decoration by Default

2020-01-16 17:41:22

Xfce 4.16 will look a little different to long time users when it arrives later this year, as the popular desktop environment is adopting client side decoration by default. But before you cry tears over […] This post, Xfce 4.16 is Adopting Client Side Decoration by Default, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Employee Spotlight: Mark Richman

2020-01-16 17:33:45

Mark Richman, AWS Training Architect   “Taking courses is great, doing Hands-On Labs is even better. But the best thing you can do is build something for someone else to use.” If you’re here to fully understand Mark Richman in his entirety, you’re going to need to keep digging. Just as he’s spent his life […] The post Employee Spotlight: Mark Richman appeared first on Linux Academy.

NY Fed Reveals Implications of Cyberattack on US Financial System

2020-01-16 17:15:00

A "pre-mortem analysis" sheds light on the potential destruction of a cyberattack against major US banks.

A Long Way Down blends together Slay the Spire card combat with maze building - now in Early Access

2020-01-16 17:10:33

Tags: Initial Thoughts, Strategy, RPG, Early Access, New Release, Deck-builderOne thing is for sure, Slay the Spire truly has kicked off a deck-building indie game revolution of sorts. More and more are releasing with deck-building and A Long Way Down seems like one of the better ones so far. Note: Key provided by the publisher, Goblinz Studio. Quite derivative I would say though, in the nicest way possible. The deck-building card-based combat from Slay the Spire is merged in with maze building in a similar fashion to what's seen in Guild of Dungeoneering. Watch video on YouTube.com Your character is dead, in some sort of limbo as a friend performs a ritual for your passing and you have an evil dungeon master on your tail who is pretty angry at you pinching their cards. Not alone though, you find other characters during a run who can join you to form a party. So there's quite a lot of different game styled and mechanics all blended in here. The two major styles of turn-based card combat and maze building work together quite nicely though, as you build your path towards or away from encounters to escape it's certainly an intriguing blend and I'm all for it. You can even knock down a tile below an enemy, if you're lucky and escape a potentially fatal encounter. Characters have different stats and abilities, which can affect your cards so using the right character to maximise each card is a must. During combat you can actually switch between characters any time but your whole party shares action points to balance that. Each character can have a different set of equipment too, including a basic weapon, helmet, armour and more to further affect your status. Once you've completed a maze without dying, you're taking to a special Home area where you can change your equipment, cards and do some upgrades. From here, you can choose to repeat previous levels or move onto the next too. Thanks to the maze building, the number of cards and the way you progress it can be repeated a lot of times and seems like it will be a lot of fun. I've been impressed with the few hours I've had with it, a very alluring mix and the Linux version works without issues. Feature Highlight: Build a crew to roam the darkness of the mastermind's lair  Dive in a journey where sin meets virtue on every crossroad  Gather memories from your past to understand the heroes journey  Upgrade epic weapons & armors to overcome bigger foes  Adapt your play style & upgrade your skills to face various challenges  Play the adventure again and try new morality choices You can find A Long Way Down in Early Access on Steam. Their current plan is to remain there for 4-8 months before releasing in full, with that time depending on the kind of feedback they get.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Zorin OS Makes It Easy to Deploy Linux-Powered Computers in Schools, Businesses

2020-01-16 17:10:00

The Zorin OS development team announced today a new tool to make it easier for organizations to deploy a fleet of Linux-powered computers and administrate them from a a centralized place. Meet Zorin Grid, an in-house built tool whose whole purpose is to make it simple for IT administrators to set up, manage, and secure a fleet of Linux-powered computers in any type of organization, including small and medium sized businesses or schools and universities. The tool also provides a centralized place to administrate all these computers. "We've been working on a major new product over the past 2 years, and we’re excited to finally introduce it to you today. We're moving onto the next part of the Zorin OS master plan: to bring Linux into the working world; into businesses, schools, and organizations. We’re making this possible with the help of our new product called Zorin Grid," reads today's

Zorin Grid Lets You Remotely Manage Multiple Zorin OS Computers

2020-01-16 17:05:35

With Zorin Grid, you can configure and manage several Zorin OS computers remotely. Know more about it. read more

Xfce 4.16 Desktop Environment Switches to Client-Side Decorations

2020-01-16 16:52:00

Work on the upcoming Xfce 4.16 desktop environment continues in 2020 with a lot of new features and improvements that the community can test drive using the Xfce 4.15 development branch. Xfce developer Simon Steinbeiß reports on the latest changes and improvements that have been added to the forthcoming Xfce 4.16 desktop environment release, and the biggest new feature so far is support for client-side decorations (CSD) or GtkHeaderBars for all dialogs. "The first big step in this direction has now happened in libxfce4ui, our main user interface library. With the change, almost all dialogs will be converted to using CSD by default without any code changes in existing projects," said developer Simon Steinbeiß in a recent blog post. Dark panel now enabled by default Among other enhancements that landed lately for the Xfce 4.16 desktop environment, we c...

Introduction to Bash Scripting Tutorial

2020-01-16 16:28:13

Linux Shell Scripting is & always has been one of the most desired skills that a System Administrator and now DevOps engineers are required to have. It has been used by Linux experts to perform all sorts of…

A technology for embedding data in printed objects

2020-01-16 16:24:24

A team from Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), composed of Ph.D. Student Arnaud Delmotte, Professor Yasuhiro Mukaigawa, Associate Professor Takuya Funatomi, Assistant Professor Hiroyuki Kubo, and Assistant Professor Kenichiro Tanaka, has developed a new method to embed information in a 3-D printed object and retrieve it using a consumer document scanner. Information such as a serial ID can be embedded without modifying the shape of the object, and be simply extracted from a single image of a commercially available document scanner.

KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS: New Features & Key Changes

2020-01-16 16:10:40

KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS is the latest version of this popular Linux desktop environment. We look at the new features and improvements this release offers. This post, KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS: New Features & Key Changes, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Here’s What’s New in KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS

2020-01-16 16:10:40

KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS is the latest version of this popular Linux desktop environment. We look at the new features and improvements this release offers. This post, Here’s What’s New in KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience -Reading Comics ??? Week 12

2020-01-16 16:00:00

 LinuxLinks: You'd be surprised how many good comic readers run well on RPI4

elementary OS 6 Will Be Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa)

2020-01-16 15:58:00

The elementary OS team is kicking off 2020 with a retrospective of the things they managed to do in 2019 and a set of goals for the year ahead as they want to further improve their Linux-based operating system. In a recent blog post, elementary co-founder Cassidy James Blaede talks about an "intense and record-breaking" 2019 and also highlights some of the major goals for 2020 while also revealing the fact that work on the next major release, elementary OS 6, is on the way and it will be based on the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system. "Ubuntu 20.04 LTS will be coming out this year, and subsequently we plan to release elementary OS 6 with a 20.04 base. We've begun some of the underlying work to migrate to and build against newer l...

KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Reaches Beta With Much Better GTK App Integration

2020-01-16 15:20:32

Out this morning is the first beta of KDE Plasma 5.18, which is also the project's first long-term support (LTS) release since Plasma 5.12...

How to Setup FEMP Stack (FreeBSD, Nginx, MySQL 8 and PHP 7.4) on FreeBSD 12

2020-01-16 15:13:53

FEMP is an acronym that stands for FreeBSD (operating system), Nginx (HTTP server pronounced Engine-x), MySQL (database server), and PHP (programming language to process dynamic PHP content). In this tutorial, we'll set up components of a FEMP stack on a FreeBSD 12.1 server using pkg, the FreeBSD package manager.

What we can learn about ourselves from studying financial trading bots

2020-01-16 15:10:05

In 2019, the world fretted that algorithms now know us better than we know ourselves. No concept captures this better than surveillance capitalism, a term coined by American writer Shoshana Zuboff to describe a bleak new era in which the likes of Facebook and Google provide popular services while their algorithms hawk our digital traces.

What CES 2020 taught us about this year's phones: Cheaper foldables, 5G and more

2020-01-16 15:00:02

The phones of CES weren't many, but they were informative, hinting at important trends we'll see in 2020—including cheaper applications of 2019's most expensive features. Typically, the CES showing settles on midrange devices, but this year also brought us some interesting concepts to chew over, and a realistic look at what we can look forward to.

Active Directory Needs an Update: Here's Why

2020-01-16 15:00:00

AD is still the single point of authentication for most companies that use Windows. But it has some shortcomings that should be addressed.

GNU Guile 3.0 Released With JIT Code Generation For Up To 4x Better Performance

2020-01-16 14:56:33

GNU Guile 3.0 has been released, the GNU's implementation of the Scheme programming language with various extra features. The big news with Guile 3.0 is better performance...

Southwest delays resumption of Boeing 737 MAX flights

2020-01-16 14:55:54

Southwest Airlines announced Thursday it will once again delay resumption of Boeing 737 MAX flights until June 6, because of continued uncertainty over the troubled aircraft's return to service.

'Invisible computing' startup unveils smart contact lens

2020-01-16 14:55:35

A startup focused on "invisible computing" Thursday unveiled a smart contact lens which delivers an augmented reality display in a user's field of vision.

Will electric cars continue to be mainly for affluent buyers?

2020-01-16 14:50:01

A column from Charles Lane of The Washington Post, which ran in print in The San Diego Union-Tribune on Jan.2, argued that excitement and belief in electric vehicles is overblown.

Photoelectrochemical water-splitting efficiency hits 4.5%

2020-01-16 14:49:49

Solar-to-fuel conversion offers a promising technology to solve energy problems, yet device performance could be limited by undesired sunlight absorption. Researchers show copper thiocyanate can assist hole transport in oxide photoelectrodes and enable a 4.55 percent solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in tandem devices.

Remember DVDs? Two studios have a plan to preserve the near-dead format

2020-01-16 14:43:01

The market for DVD and Blu-ray discs has been on life support for years, as streaming has become the technology of choice for home video customers.

Plasma 5.18 LTS Beta

2020-01-16 14:34:18

KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Beta Thursday, 16 January 2020. The Plasma 5.18 LTS Beta is out! This new version of your favorite desktop environment adds neat new features that make your life easier, including clearer notifications, streamlined settings for your system and the desktop layout, much improved GTK integration, and more. Plasma 5.18 is easier and more fun, while at the same time allowing you to do more tasks faster. Apart from all the cool new stuff, Plasma 5.18 also comes with LTS status. LTS stands for "Long Term Support" and this means 5.18 will be updated and maintained by KDE contributors for the next couple of years (regular versions are maintained for 4 months). So, if you are thinking of updating or migrating your school, company or organization to Plasma, this version is your best bet. You get the most recent stable version of Plasma for the long term. Read on to discover everything that is new in Plasma 5.18 LTS… Plasma Emoji Selector Customize Layout Global Settings GTK Applications with CSDs and Theme Integration Night Color System Tray Widget Emoji Selector that can be opened through the application launcher or with the Meta + . keyboard shortcut New global edit mode which replaces the desktop toolbox button and lets you easily customize your desktop layout Improved touch-friendliness for the Kickoff application launcher and widget editing Support for GTK applications which use Client Side Decorations, adding proper shadows and resize areas for them GTK apps now also automatically inherit Plasma's settings for fonts, icons, cursors and more. There's a new System Tray widget for toggling the Night Color feature and by default it automatically appears when it's on More compact design to choose the default audio device in the Audio Volume System Tray widget Clickable volume indicator and tooltip item highlight indicators in the Task Manager Circular Application Launcher menu user icon Option to hide the lock screen clock It's now possible to configure keyboard shortcuts that turn Night Color and Do Not Disturb mode on or off Windy conditions shown in weather widget Notifications Draggable Download File Icon Bluetooth Device Battery Low Notification The timeout indicator on notification popups has been made circular and surrounds the close button A draggable icon in the "file downloaded" notification has been added, so you can quickly drag it to places Plasma now shows you a notification warning when a connected Bluetooth device is about to run out of power System Settings User Feedback Application Style Plasma gained optional User Feedback settings (disabled by default), allowing you to give us detailed system information and statistics on how often individual features of Plasma you use Added a slider for the global animation speed Redesigned Application Style settings with a grid view Improved the search in the system settings sidebar An option to scroll to clicked location in the scrollbar track has been added The System Settings Night Color page has a clearer user interface now Discover Reading and Writing Review Comments Discover's default keyboard focus has been switched to the search field It's now possible to search for add-ons from the main page Added nested comments for addons Made design improvements to the sidebar header and reviews More NVIDIA GPU stats Decreased the amount of visual glitches in apps when using fractional scaling on X11 Made it possible to show NVIDIA GPU stats in KSysGuard New Since 5.12 LTS For those upgrading from our previous Long Term Support release here are some of the highlights from the last two years of development: Completely rewritten notification system Plasma Browser Integration Many redesigned system settings pages, either using a consistent grid view or just an overhauled interface Global menu support for GTK applications Display Management improvements including new OSD and widget Flatpak portal support Night Color feature Thunderbolt Device Management Full Plasma 5.18 LTS Beta changelog Live Images The easiest way to try it out is with a live image booted off a USB disk. Docker images also provide a quick and easy way to test Plasma. Download live images with Plasma 5 Download Docker images with Plasma 5 Package Downloads Distributions have created, or are in the process of creating, packages listed on our wiki page. Get KDE Software on Your Linux Distro wiki page Source Downloads You can install Plasma 5 directly from source. Community instructions to compile it Source Info Page Feedback You can give us feedback and get updates on our social media channels: Post on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Diaspora Share on Reddit Share on YouTube Share on Mastodon Share on LinkedIn Share on PeerTube Share on VK Discuss Plasma 5 on the KDE Forums Plasma 5 board. You can provide feedback direct to the developers via the Plasma Matrix chat room, Plasma-devel mailing list or report issues via bugzilla. If you like what the team is doing, please let them know! Your feedback is greatly appreciated.

KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Here's What's New

2020-01-16 14:34:00

The KDE Project announced today the general availability of the beta version of the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems and Linux-powered devices. KDE Plasma 5.18 is a major version of the popular Linux desktop environment as it's the third LTS (Long Term Support) series, coming three and a half years after the first LTS branch and two years after the second one. This means that KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS will be supported with maintenance update for the next two years. "LTS stands for "Long Term Support" and this means 5.18 will be updated and maintained by KDE contributors for the next couple of years (regular versions are maintained for 4 months). So, if you are thinking of updating or migrating your school, company or organization to Plasma, this version is your best bet," reads today's announcement. What's new in KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Highlig...

Hydrogen is blowing up: From science experiment to export industry

2020-01-16 14:30:01

Remember those science experiment cars powered by water? That technology could help Australia decarbonize its economy and become a major player in a zero-emissions world.

Use iPhone as Physical Security Key to Protect Your Google Accounts

2020-01-16 14:27:03

Great news for iOS users! You can now your iPhone or iPad, running iOS 10 or later, as a physical security key for securely logging into your Google account as part of the Advanced Protection Program for two-factor authentication. Android users have had this feature on their smartphones since last year, but now Apple product owners can also use this advanced, phishing-resistant form of

The pitfalls of eco-efficiency

2020-01-16 14:25:18

The saying "the road to hell is paved with good intentions" can be applied to many situations, and among them are companies' efforts to preserve natural resources. For example, changes intended to reduce resource use can in the end have the opposite effect.

Open-world puzzler 'Bonfire Peaks' has you climb mysterious ruins and set fire to your belongings

2020-01-16 14:17:17

Tags: Steam, Indie Game, Unity, Upcoming, Puzzle, Itch.io, Open WorldArriving with Linux support on May 5, from the developer of Pipe Push Paradise and Hiding Spot is the open-world puzzle game Bonfire Peaks. Not much info on it yet, with it only just being announced. From what the developer said it's a "difficult open world puzzle game about climbing mysterious ruins and setting fire to your belongings" that's being made in Unity. They do at least have a trailer up you can see below: Watch video on YouTube.com Quite an atmospheric trailer that, short on the details but it definitely tickles my brain as it wants to know more. A difficult puzzle game about attachment, with an open-world where you're climbing around wonderfully detailed voxel art that honestly looks fantastic (and reminds me of Smith and Winston) is something I can see myself playing. The release will be on both itch and Steam on May 5 for Linux, macOS and Windows.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

LLVM 10 Adds Option To Help Offset Intel JCC Microcode Performance Impact

2020-01-16 14:06:00

Disclosed back in November was the Intel Jump Conditional Code Erratum that necessitated updated CPU microcode to mitigate and with that came with a nearly across the board performance impact. But Intel developers had been working on assembler patches for helping to reduce that performance hit. The GNU Assembler patches were merged back in December while now ahead of LLVM 10.0 that alternative toolchain has an option for helping to recover some of the lost performance...

Kaby Lake edge AI system features Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080

2020-01-16 13:59:33

Ibase’s Ubuntu-ready “EC-7100” edge AI computer combines a 7th Gen Intel Core i7 with Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics. The system offers 2x M.2, mini-PCIe, 2x SATA 3.0, 4x DP, 4x USB 3.0, and up to 3x GbE ports. The EC-7100 is another example of the trend of adding discrete graphics cards to embedded systems […]

Games: Nimbatus, Core Defense, CreatorCrate and More

2020-01-16 13:50:46

Action-packed drone building game 'Nimbatus' has a huge update, we have 3 copies to give away We've teamed up with Stray Fawn Studio again to give away three copies of their space drone construction game, Nimbatus, plus there's a massive update out now. So what's new in the "Mothership Update"? A lot and it sounds awesome! Your Nimbatus mothership can be upgraded now, there's some Steam Achievements with drone skins you can unlock and they will be adding even more in the next update. There's a new "Programmer" Captain to pick which unlocks everything but it only allows you to build autonomous drones (no manual piloting), proper save file management giving more freedom, new difficulty settings, multiple new locations including a Jungle Ruin and new rewards when you advance through the campaign. There's also new building parts, bug fixes and balancing changes Core Defense aims to mix up the Tower Defense genre with deck-building and randomness - out now Core Defense, available today in First Access on itch.io is a Tower Defense game that's trying to be a little different. Throwing out predefined waves and rewards, in favour of a little random generation. Note: The developer provided an early key for GamingOnLinux. Having everything mostly set in place is usually a big part of Tower Defense, since you know what you will be dealing with and often from where. Throwing that out to keep you on your toes is certainly interesting, as is the rewards system of getting you to pick from a randomised set of rewards each time which could be a new tower or an upgrade. Chaotic platformer with a curved gameworld 'CreatorCrate' getting a demo next week You've played plenty of platformers before, but have you played a platformer where the entire world is a great big spinning space station with variable gravity? CreatorCrate has a fun idea. In CreatorCrate you play as a little robot that eats anything, to then print out shiny new objects that might be a bit more useful. Gravity is different throughout the space station, except in the middle where it vanishes altogether. Currently in development by Jori Ryan, it sadly didn't pass the Kickstarter test with it not getting enough funding. Ryan carried on development and they've let us know that next week on January 22nd it's going to get a public demo. The Frictional Games strange teaser appears to be growing Frictional Games, the team that craft some very interesting horror experiences like SOMA and Amnesia are teasing something and it appears to now be growing. We posted about it recently, since then checking back each day on their dedicated teaser website to see if anything is different. It appears the video file playing has a date on it when checking the page source, which they update each time a new video is put up. Valve give a little more info on what 'Gamescope' actually does for Linux gaming Recently, a Valve developer revived steamcompmgr (the SteamOS compositing and window manager) and renamed it to Gamescope. After writing about it yesterday here on GOL, they've now given some more info on what it actually does. Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais is spearheading the effort and a few hours ago they actually gave it a readme, mentioning that "gamescope does the same thing as steamcompmgr, but with less extra copies and latency" read more

Linux 5.6 Crypto Getting AVX/AVX2/AVX-512 Optimized Poly1305 - Helps WireGuard

2020-01-16 13:30:22

Now that lead WireGuard lead developer Jason Donenfeld has managed to get this secure VPN tunnel technology queued for introduction in Linux 5.6 mainline, he's begun optimizing other areas of the kernel for optimal WireGuard performance...

Screen time: Conclusions about the effects of digital media are often incomplete, irrelevant or wrong

2020-01-16 13:28:04

There's a lot of talk about digital media. Increasing screen time has created worries about media's impacts on democracy, addiction, depression, relationships, learning, health, privacy and much more. The effects are frequently assumed to be huge, even apocalyptic.

Patent talk: Mobile device with solar panels

2020-01-16 13:21:51

Are we to expect to see a future Surface Pro with solar panels? Microsoft has thought about a solar power idea as apparent in a patent that the tech giant filed with the USPTO, namely, "Mobile device cover with integrated solar panel." Tech watchers are poised to think this will be seen, if at all seen, in the Surface Pro.

Apps may soon be able to predict your life expectancy, but do you want to know?

2020-01-16 13:20:01

This question has endured across cultures and civilizations. It has given rise to a plethora of religions and spiritual paths over thousands of years, and more recently, some highly amusing apps.

Insight into Why Hyperbola GNU/Linux is Turning into Hyperbola BSD

2020-01-16 13:12:06

In late December 2019, Hyperbola announced that they would be making major changes to their project. They have decided to drop the Linux kernel in favor of forking the OpenBSD kernel. This announcement only came months after Project Trident announced that they were going in the opposite direction (from BSD to Linux). Hyperbola also plans to replace all software that is not GPL v3 compliant with new versions that are. To get more insight into the future of their new project, I interviewed Andre, co-founder of Hyperbola. read more

UK police use of facial recognition tests public's tolerance

2020-01-16 13:06:17

When British police used facial recognition cameras to monitor crowds arriving for a soccer match in Wales, some fans protested by covering their faces. In a sign of the technology's divisiveness, even the head of a neighboring police force said he opposed it.

Top 5 Linux Distros for Windows Users

2020-01-16 12:59:10

When Microsoft initially released Windows 7 in October 2009, the software giant committed to providing ten years of support for its popular operating system. The much-maligned Microsoft was true to their word, support for Windows 7 ended just yesterday a little over ten years after its release. According to NetMarketShare, the Windows 7 EOL will affect over one-third of PCs that use Windows 7. That’s hundreds of millions of people. Many no doubt will foolishly continue to use the unsupported OS, placing their PCs at “greater risk for viruses and malware.” Still, a great many others will incur the $139 to “upgrade to Windows 10. However, there is a third option. A much better option. To upgrade is to “raise (something) to a higher standard, in particular, improve (equipment or machinery) by adding or replacing components.” read more

When Kickstarter goes wrong for indie games: Drift Stage

2020-01-16 12:57:06

Tags: Editorial, Indie Game, Crowdfunding, Racing, RetroA lot of the time Kickstarter (and other crowdfunding services) for indie games goes well, in fact the vast majority of the time all is fine. Sometimes though, everything breaks down as is the case with Drift Stage. Drift Stage was successfully funded on Kickstarter back in February of 2015, with a reasonable sum of $57,720 to make their modern take on retro racing a reality. Over the years, they released multiple demo versions and showed it off at Minecon (the Minecraft convention) in 2016 which you can still find a demo of here on itch.io and all seemed well on the surface. Time went on, backers noticed a lack of new details and progress on it with many trying to find out what was actually going on. In December of 2018, the Artist on the project Charles "DelkoDuck" Blanchard posted on Steam to finally clear it up and it wasn't good. The programmer and co-creator, Chase Pettit, apparently did a bit of a disappearing act and was just too busy for it. A lot more time went on, more began to question what was happening and Blanchard posted a new update in December last year on Steam. They said that Drift Stage has not been abandoned by them, although Pettit is still nowhere to be seen to work on the code and that "the companies bank account was tapped out and the project no longer appealed to Chase Pettit". Additionally, they've been dealing with legal issues "after a Chilean studio decompiled the Kickstarter demo an attempted to pass themselves off as the games developer". They've been trying to get a publisher to pick it up and carry it on, as they can't do any of the code and they're the only one left on the project. Right now, it seems New Blood Interactive have showed a little interest in picking it up, will let you know if anything happens from that. A real shame, but as with any crowdfunding you don't really know what's going to happen. You're not necessarily funding the game but the people behind it to live and attempt to create their vision. It doesn't always go to plan, as seen here. Going by our own list though, you can see the majority turn out quite well.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Detecting and mitigating network attacks with a multi-prong approach

2020-01-16 12:31:23

To solve a problem, you must first see the problem. More than that, whatever fallout the problem is causing must be controlled while you solve it. That's the approach an international team of researchers has taken for combating network attacks. They have published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica.

Brain-like network uses disorder to detect order

2020-01-16 12:22:47

A disordered network that is capable of detecting ordered patterns: This sounds contradictory, but it comes close to describing the way the brain works. Researchers of the University of Twente have developed a such brain-inspired network based on silicon technology that can be operated at room temperature. It makes use of material properties that electronic designers usually like to avoid. Thanks to "hopping conduction," the system evolves to a solution without making use of predesigned elements. The researchers publish their work in Nature on January 15, 2020.

Core Defense aims to mix up the Tower Defense genre with deck-building and randomness - out now

2020-01-16 12:20:50

Tags: Tower Defense, Itch.io, Early Access, New Release, Deck-builderCore Defense, available today in First Access on itch.io is a Tower Defense game that's trying to be a little different. Throwing out predefined waves and rewards, in favour of a little random generation. Note: The developer provided an early key for GamingOnLinux. Having everything mostly set in place is usually a big part of Tower Defense, since you know what you will be dealing with and often from where. Throwing that out to keep you on your toes is certainly interesting, as is the rewards system of getting you to pick from a randomised set of rewards each time which could be a new tower or an upgrade. Watch video on YouTube.com The gameplay isn't just building towers, picking rewards and hoping for the best. There's strategy involved, especially since you're building walls too which affects the enemy wave path. This means you can attempt to box enemies into a death-trap, which with the randomness of the rewards you get can certainly end up with some very amusing combinations. What's also great, is being able to set the priority that your towers focus on. So when building a little maze for enemies to travel though, you can prioritise enemies with low health near the front and high health at the back and all sorts depending on what towers you pick as your rewards, your tactics will change on each play-through. Some games in recent years started offering to capture a gif or short video of gameplay, which I've quite enjoyed. Here it wouldn't quite make sense as it's not really flashy but the developer did do something fun, you can quickly export your run statistics like this: As a reminder on the history of it, Core Defense is a singleplayer spinoff from Coregrounds, a multiplayer Tower Defense game released in 2018, and shut down in early 2019 due to various reasons. After the shutdown, lead developer Mario "ehmprah" Kaiser still had an itch that could only be scratched by reinventing the Tower Defense genre yet again, this time with solo project Core Defense. Find it on itch.io now with a normal price of $9.99 but it's currently 10% off, although it may go a bit higher depending on where you live since itch add VAT after you decide to hit purchase (which is very annoying). It's also coming to Steam later this year when it's ready.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Zhaoxin 7-Series x86 CPUs Mitigated For Spectre V2 + SWAPGS

2020-01-16 11:45:18

When it comes to the Zhaoxin x86-compatible processors coming out of VIA's joint venture in Shanghai, their forthcoming 7-series (KX-7000) has hardware mitigations in place for some CPU vulnerabilities...

Google reveals new schedule for 'phasing out support for Chrome Apps across all operating systems'

2020-01-16 11:45:05

June 2020 is the end for users on Windows, Linux and Mac Google has rolled out a new schedule for ending support for Chrome Apps – packaged desktop applications built with HTML, CSS and JavaScript – in favour of Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) and other browser-based approaches such as Chrome Extensions.…

Best Road Trip Apps for Android Device in 2019

2020-01-16 11:29:41

In recent times we’ve covered topics on Android covering content like file managers, music downloaders, video editors. But we’re in a celebratory mood and my focus is on trying to get lost in a new place. Road trips make up some of my favorite holidays and oh, how much more awesome would it have been if there were these many cool applications to enable me to visualize my travel plan. It’s the holiday season and I imagine that sooner or later many of us will be taking a couple of trips. Whether you’re already on your road trip or not, today’s list is a collection of the best Android apps of 2019 that will make your journey a lot easier and enjoyable. read more

Western Digital's Zonefs File-System Looks Like It Could Be Ready To Land With Linux 5.6

2020-01-16 11:27:04

Introduced last month was Zonefs as a new Linux file-system developed by Western Digital. It's looking like that new file-system could be ready for introduction with the upcoming Linux 5.6 cycle...

Alarm clock Set Timeout For A Shell Command

2020-01-16 11:18:00

Chaotic platformer with a curved gameworld 'CreatorCrate' getting a demo next week

2020-01-16 11:11:00

Tags: Steam, Indie Game, Upcoming, Roguelike, Platformer, DemoYou've played plenty of platformers before, but have you played a platformer where the entire world is a great big spinning space station with variable gravity? CreatorCrate has a fun idea. In CreatorCrate you play as a little robot that eats anything, to then print out shiny new objects that might be a bit more useful. Gravity is different throughout the space station, except in the middle where it vanishes altogether. Currently in development by Jori Ryan, it sadly didn't pass the Kickstarter test with it not getting enough funding. Ryan carried on development and they've let us know that next week on January 22nd it's going to get a public demo. They also put up a fresh trailer in the last few months, take a look: Watch video on YouTube.com Gameplay is very chaotic due to the gravity, item creation and the various enemies. Not just that though, the way you control your character looks and sound hilarious too, with a "physics arm" that follows the mouse, a bit like Getting Over It. You can move everything around, throw objects at people and cause chaos. You can follow and wishlist it on Steam, I'll do a reminder when the demo is available. As for a proper release, the developer mentioned sometime this Fall with full Linux support.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Windows 10 users: Google reveals when it's killing off Chrome apps

2020-01-16 11:07:00

Google to end support for Chrome apps for Windows, Mac, and Linux this year to push ahead with web apps.

The Frictional Games strange teaser appears to be growing

2020-01-16 10:38:02

Tags: Indie Game, Upcoming, Horror, Teaser, SpeculationFrictional Games, the team that craft some very interesting horror experiences like SOMA and Amnesia are teasing something and it appears to now be growing. We posted about it recently, since then checking back each day on their dedicated teaser website to see if anything is different. It appears the video file playing has a date on it when checking the page source, which they update each time a new video is put up. This new and slightly bigger teaser is from the 14th, so here's a comparison from when it glows brightest each time. The left is from late December, next is January 6th and the right is the newest at the 14th: They've said absolutely nothing on it. Their official site, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr have been silent on it which is surprising. Not even a quick link to it, nothing. A few of their team have been active in their Discord but from the chat I looked over, nothing leaked yet. Whatever this pulsing thing is, it has my curiosity. I really do want to know more! My original thought was some kind of fetus developing, I still think it could be that but that would probably be far too easy. Perhaps it's an actual heart, someone is growing a heart? Valentines day comes up next month, that could be an interesting time to announce it.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

Google announces end of support dates for Chrome Apps on Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome OS

2020-01-16 10:30:38

The end of support for Chrome apps has been a long time coming -- Google announced more than two years ago that it was going to start winding things down. The Chrome Web Store has already been stripped of the App section on Windows, macOS and Linux, and now Google has announced that it is to be pulled from Chrome OS too. The company has also revealed the dates on which support will be dropped completely for all platforms. See also: Microsoft turns the screws on Windows 7 users with full-screen upgrade warnings Today is the day Windows 7 dies,… [Continue Reading]

Red Hat ups its OpenShift Kubernetes hybrid-cloud game

2020-01-16 10:16:32

Red Hat is releasing a new version of its OpenShift Kubernetes platform, OpenShift 4.3, with better container storage support via Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.

Valve give a little more info on what 'Gamescope' actually does for Linux gaming

2020-01-16 09:39:38

Tags: Steam, Open Source, SteamOS, ValveRecently, a Valve developer revived steamcompmgr (the SteamOS compositing and window manager) and renamed it to Gamescope. After writing about it yesterday here on GOL, they've now given some more info on what it actually does. Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais is spearheading the effort and a few hours ago they actually gave it a readme, mentioning that "gamescope does the same thing as steamcompmgr, but with less extra copies and latency". From the readme: - It's getting game frames through Wayland by way of Xwayland, so there's no copy within X itself before it gets the frame. - It can use DRM/KMS to directly flip game frames to the screen, even when stretching or when notifications are up, removing another copy. - When it does need to composite with the GPU, it does so with async Vulkan compute, meaning you get to see your frame quick even if the game already has the GPU busy with the next frame.   It also runs on top of a regular desktop, the 'nested' usecase steamcompmgr didn't support. - Because the game is running in its own personal Xwayland sandbox desktop, it can't interfere with your desktop and your desktop can't interfere with it. - You can spoof a virtual screen with a desired resolution and refresh rate as the only thing the game sees, and control/resize the output as needed. This can be useful in exotic display configurations like ultrawide or multi-monitor setups that involve rotation.   The features of that second part are working, but aren't exposed to the user yet. Right now, they said it runs on an AMD GPU with Mesa but could be made to work with other drivers "with minimal work". NVIDIA would need to support accelerated Xwayland to work with Gamescope. Definitely going to be interesting to find out their actual plan for it. A revived Steam Machine effort, perhaps with an AMD GPU? Or something else to help with whatever Steam Cloud Gaming turns out to be—a simple Linux front end for it perhaps? Back down to reality for a moment, it's more likely it's linked to their container effort to make Linux games run exactly how they want them across the many different distributions and desktops. Many questions. I've emailed Valve to see if they want to give us any insight, although they're usually tight-lipped though so we might have to just wait and see if it's for a big plan or just a fun project for now.Article from GamingOnLinux.com

How to Use Top Command in Linux

2020-01-16 09:02:12

If you are a user, developer or system administrator then you must have enough knowledge on how to use top and htop command. The top is a command-line utility in Linux-based operating systems that can be used to display information about the top CPU processes and memory utilization. It displays the processor activity of your Linux system and tasks managed by kernel in real-time. In this tutorial, we will show you how to use top and htop command in Linux.

Toyota investing $400 million in flying car company

2020-01-16 08:21:10

Japanese car giant Toyota said Thursday it is investing nearly $400 million in a company working on commercialising electric flying cars for "fast, quiet and affordable air transportation services".

European auto market grew by 1.2% in 2019: ACEA

2020-01-16 08:19:17

The European auto market grew by 1.2 percent last year, with a push in December raising the total number of sales to 15.3 million vehicles, sector association ACEA said Thursday.

3 open source tools to manage your contacts

2020-01-16 08:02:00

Last year, I brought you 19 days of new (to you) productivity tools for 2019. This year, I'm taking a different approach: building an environment that will allow you to be more productive in the new year, using tools you may or may not already be using. read more

Automating Helm deployments with Bash

2020-01-16 08:01:00

Some of our applications are hosted in a Kubernetes cluster, and we use GitLab Continuous Integration (CI) to automate deployments and Helm 2 to deploy our applications. Helm charts enable the storage of templates of Kubernetes object YAML files with variables that can be programmatically set from command-line arguments passed when the chart is used during deployments. This allows us to store critical secrets in GitLab-protected environment variables or in Hashicorp Vault and use them within the CI deployment job. read more

4 core skills to level-up your tech career in 2020

2020-01-16 08:00:00

We do a lot to level-up our careers. We learn new programming languages; we take on new projects at work; we work on side projects on the weekend; we contribute to open source communities. What if I were to tell you that, while these activities are helpful, there is one set of skills you should focus on if you truly want to advance your career. read more

LLVM Developers Discuss Improved Decision Making Process

2020-01-16 05:28:25

LLVM project founder Chris Lattner has proposed a new decision making process for the LLVM compiler stack around new sub-project proposals, new social policies, changes to core infrastructure, and other key changes...

How to Sync Time in Linux Server using Chrony

2020-01-16 05:20:09

Time plays an important role in Linux servers specially when they are used in banking, stock markets and other financial sectors. If we want all our Linux servers should have the correct time, then...

How to install the NVIDIA drivers on RHEL 8 Workstation

2020-01-16 03:19:46

The NVIDIA Driver is a program needed for your NVIDIA Graphics GPU to function with better performance. It communicates between your Linux operating system, in this case Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, and your hardware, the NVIDIA Graphics GPU. The NVIDIA drivers can be installed by using the bash command after stopping the GUI and disabling the nouveau driver by modifying the GRUB boot menu.

Securing Kubernetes: Bug bounty program

2020-01-16 03:00:00

ZDnet: Want to help lock down Kubernetes and make some money while you're at it? The Cloud Native Computing Foundation has a new bug bounty program for you.

How to Install Tomcat 9 on CentOS 8

2020-01-16 02:05:26

Apache Tomcat is an open-source implementation of the Java Servlet, JavaServer Pages, Java Expression Language, and Java WebSocket technologies. It is one of the most widely adopted applications and web servers in the world today. Tomcat is simple to use and has a robust ecosystem of add-ons.

Intel's Mitigation For CVE-2019-14615 Graphics Vulnerability Obliterates Gen7 iGPU Performance

2020-01-16 01:11:18

Yesterday we noted that the Linux kernel picked up a patch mitigating an Intel Gen9 graphics vulnerability. It didn't sound too bad at first but then seeing Ivy Bridge Gen7 and Haswell Gen7.5 graphics are also affected raised eyebrows especially with that requiring a much larger mitigation. Now in testing the performance impact, the current mitigation patches completely wreck the performance of Ivybridge/Haswell graphics performance.

LWN on Linux Kernel: BPF and /dev/random

2020-01-16 00:56:15

A medley of performance-related BPF patches BPF programs cannot run until they are "attached" to a specific call point. Tracing programs are attached to tracepoints, while networking express data path (XDP) programs are attached to a specific network device. In general, more than one program can be attached at any given location. When it comes time to run attached programs, the kernel will work through a linked list and invoke each program in turn. Actually executing a compiled BPF program is done with an indirect jump. Such jumps were never entirely fast, but in the age of speculative-execution vulnerabilities those jumps have been turned into retpolines — a construct that defeats a number of Spectre attacks, but which also turns indirect jumps into something that is far slower than they were before. For cases where BPF programs are invoked frequently, such as for every incoming network packet, that extra overhead hurts. There have been a number of efforts aimed at reducing the retpoline performance penalty in various parts of the kernel. The BPF dispatcher patch set is Björn Töpel's approach to the problem for BPF programs, and for the XDP use case in particular. It maintains a machine-code trampoline containing a direct jump instruction for every attached BPF program; this trampoline must be regenerated whenever a program is added to or removed from the list. When the time comes to call a BPF program, the trampoline is invoked with the address of the program of interest; it then executes a binary search to find the direct-jump instruction corresponding to that program. The jump is then executed, causing the desired program to be run. That may seem like a lot of overhead to replace an indirect call, but it is still faster than using a retpoline — by a factor of about three, according to the performance result posted with the patch series. In fact, indirect jumps are so expensive that the dispatcher is competitive even in the absence of retpolines, so it is enabled whether retpolines are in use or not. This code is in its fifth revision and seems likely to make its way into the mainline before too long. Removing the Linux /dev/random blocking pool The random-number generation facilities in the kernel have been reworked some over the past few months—but problems in that subsystem have been addressed over an even longer time frame. The most recent changes were made to stop the getrandom() system call from blocking for long periods of time at system boot, but the underlying cause was the behavior of the blocking random pool. A recent patch set would remove that pool and it would seem to be headed for the mainline kernel. Andy Lutomirski posted version 3 of the patch set toward the end of December. It makes "two major semantic changes to Linux's random APIs". It adds a new GRND_INSECURE flag to the getrandom() system call (though Lutomirski refers to it as getentropy(), which is implemented in glibc using getrandom() with fixed flags); that flag would cause the call to always return the amount of data requested, but with no guarantee that the data is random. The kernel would just make its best effort to give the best random data it has at that point in time. "Calling it 'INSECURE' is probably the best we can do to discourage using this API for things that need security." The patches also remove the blocking pool. The kernel currently maintains two pools of random data, one that corresponds to /dev/random and another for /dev/urandom, as described in this 2015 article. The blocking pool is the one for /dev/random; reads to that device will block (thus the name) until "enough" entropy has been gathered from the system to satisfy the request. Further reads from that file will also block if there is insufficient entropy in the pool. read more

Edge AI server packs in a 16-core Cortex-A72 CPU plus up to 32 i.MX8M SoCs and 128 NPUs

2020-01-16 00:40:30

SolidRun’s “Janux GS31 AI Inference Server” runs Linux on its CEx7 LX2160A Type 7 module equipped with NXP’s 16-core Cortex-A72 LX2160A. The system also supplies up to 32 i.MX8M SoCs for video and up to 128 Grylfalcon Lightspeeur 2803 NPUs via multiple “Snowball” modules. When people talk about edge AI servers, they might be referring to some of the high-end embedded systems we regularly cover here at LinuxGizmos or perhaps something more server-like such as SolidRun’s rackmount form factor Janux GS31 AI Inference Server. The system would generally exceed the upper limits of our product coverage, but it’s a particularly intriguing beastie. The Janux GS31 is based on a SolidRun CEx7 LX2160A COM Express Type 7 module, which also powers the SolidRun HoneyComb LX2K networking board that we covered in June. Also: Google Cloud Now Offering IBM Power SystemsGoogle Cloud Now Offering IBM Power Systems read more

Distribution Release: CentOS 8.1.1911

2020-01-16 00:13:39

CentOS, which builds its distribution's packages from upstream sources provided by Red Hat Enterprise Linux, has published a new release, CentOS 8.1.1911. The new version is derived from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 source code. "Release for CentOS Linux 8 (1911): We are pleased to announce the....

Events: FSF/LibrePlanet 2020 and Free Software Foundation Europe/Perl/Raku

2020-01-16 00:09:57

First LibrePlanet 2020 keynote announcement: Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced Brewster Kahle as its first keynote speaker for LibrePlanet 2020. The annual technology and social justice conference will be held in the Boston area on March 14 and 15, 2020, with the theme "Free the Future." Call for FOSDEM 2020 Booth volunteers This year we've got one of the high-traffic locations, on the ground floor where Free Software Foundation Europe set up last year, right next to the stairway to *all* the dev rooms. So we're looking for volunteers to come and talk about both Perl and Raku at FOSDEM 2020 in Brussels. If I haven't already talked to you, please email me at drforr [at] pobox (dot) com and give me an idea of your availability and what you'd want to do. We've made arrangements for the usual booth swag, and will have pamphlets to hand out and books to sell on both Raku and Perl. read more

Programming: GNOME, RQuantLib, Skills and Wombat Dressing Room

2020-01-16 00:06:50

Federico Mena-Quintero: Exposing C and Rust APIs: some thoughts from librsvg Librsvg exports two public APIs: the C API that is in turn available to other languages through GObject Introspection, and the Rust API. You could call this a use of the facade pattern on top of the rsvg_internals crate. That crate is the actual implementation of librsvg, and exports an interface with many knobs that are not exposed from the public APIs. The knobs are to allow for the variations in each of those APIs. This post is about some interesting things that have come up during the creation/separation of those public APIs, and the implications of having an internals library that implements both. Dirk Eddelbuettel: RQuantLib 0.4.11: More polish New year, new RQuantLib! A new release 0.4.11 of RQuantLib arrived overnight on CRAN; and a Debian upload will follow shortly. QuantLib is a very comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance; RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language. This version does three new things. First, we fixed an oversight on our end and now allow a null calendar (as the C++ API). Second, the package switched to tinytest as a few of my other packages have done, allowing for very flexible testing during development and deployment—three cheers for easily testing installed packages too. Third, and per a kind nag from Kurt Hornik I updated a few calls which the current QuantLib 1.17 marks as deprecated. That lead to a compile issue with 1.16 so the change is conditional in one part. Top Skills In Demand For 2020 [Ed: One cannot properly study jobs in need based only on ads in a site owned and controlled by Microsoft] The start of the year, when it is traditional to come up with self-improving resolutions, is a good time to contemplate new job opportunities. So what are employers looking for in 2020? Here we have two lists of the most sought skills. The first thing to note is that both of them are biased and there is little common ground between them. The divergence is because they have been constructed with differing goals. As a jobs site Dice is on the look out for the terms that crop up in job postings while LinkedIn Learning is hoping to sign you (or your employer) up to its skill building courses which are provided by Lynda.com, the online learning platform which LinkedIn acquired in 2015. Google open-sources tool to boost 2FA adoption in npm Google has open-sourced an npm publishing tool for heightened security across organizations? client libraries. The tool, Wombat Dressing Room, aims to reduce the security risks associated with the automation of npm publishing. ?On my team, a small number of developers manage over 75 Node.js libraries,? Benjamin Coe, developer engineer at Google, said in an announcement on Friday (January 10). ?We see automation as key to making this possible,? he said. read more

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: FLOSS Weekly, Linux Headlines and Nitrux 13012020 Run Through

2020-01-16 00:03:29

FLOSS Weekly 562: Kong Kong delivers a next-generation API and service lifecycle management platform designed for modern architectures, including microservices, containers, cloud and serverless. Offering high flexibility, scalability, speed and performance, Kong enables developers and Global 5000 enterprises to reliably secure, connect and orchestrate microservice APIs for modern applications. 2020-01-15 | Linux Headlines We say goodbye to a community member, the latest Vulkan update is looking great, while GitHub, IBM, and CentOS all have announcements. Nitrux 13012020 Run Through In this video, we are looking at Nitrux 13012020. read more

KDE Development: KDE PIM and KUserFeedback

2020-01-15 23:52:01

November/December in KDE PIM Following Kévin here’s the summary of what happened around KDE PIM in the last two months. While this post got slightly delayed due to the holidays, work didn’t slow down at all. More than 1300 changes by 26 contributors landed in the KDE PIM repositories, and we got the 19.12.0 release out in December. Jonathan Riddell: KUserFeedback 0.9.90 Beta Release KUserFeedback is a framework for collecting user feedback for applications via telemetry and surveys. The library comes with an accompanying control and result UI tool. read more

PinePhone ‘Brave Heart’ Starts Shipping, Here’s What to Expect

2020-01-15 23:44:47

If you were plucky enough to pre-order a PinePhone Brave Heart edition last month you may be interested to know that devices start shipping from January 17, 2020. Yes, this week! Pine64’s Lukasz Erecinski shares […] This post, PinePhone ‘Brave Heart’ Starts Shipping, Here’s What to Expect, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Readying for the Future at Mozilla

2020-01-15 23:20:38

Mozilla must do two things in this era: Continue to excel at our current work, while we innovate in the areas most likely to impact the state of the internet and internet life. From security and privacy network architecture to the surveillance economy, artificial intelligence, identity systems, control over our data, decentralized web and content discovery and disinformation — Mozilla has a critical role to play in helping to create product solutions that address the challenges in these spaces. Creating the new products we need to change the future requires us to do things differently, including allocating resources for this purpose. We’re making a significant investment to fund innovation. In order to do that responsibly, we’ve also had to make some difficult choices which led to the elimination of roles at Mozilla which we announced internally today. read more

Things to consider when running Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure

2020-01-15 23:19:37

Devices/Embedded: MediaTek, Ingenic, Intel and More

2020-01-15 23:07:07

MediaTek Rich IoT SDK v20.0 Released, Pumpkin i500 SBC Announced MediaTek Rich IoT SDK v20.0 is Available MediaTek has announced its Rich IoT SDK v20.0 is already available for the i300 and i500 chipset series. Ingenic X1830 IoT Processor Features a 32-bit MIPS Core, 128MB DDR2 RAM Ingenic is a silicon vendor based in Beijing, China and known for its MIPS Xburst processors such as JZ4780 dual-core SoC or T10 video processor. Introducing the Intel NUC 9 Compute Elements, Mini PC Kits, and 3rd-Party Ecosystem Intel Sends Out Linux Patches For Speed Select Core-Power Controls Coming to Linux last year with the 5.3 kernel was Intel Speed Select Technology support as a Cascade Lake feature for optimizing the per-core performance configurations to favor certain cores at the cost of reducing the performance capacity for other CPU cores. That Intel Speed Select (SST) support for Linux is now being enhanced with core-power controls. Automate Your Life With Node-RED (Plus A Dash Of MQTT) For years we’ve seen a trickle of really interesting home automation projects that use the Node-RED package. Each time, the hackers behind these projects have raved about Node-RED and now I’ve joined those ranks as well. This graphic-based coding platform lets you quickly put together useful operations and graphic user interfaces (GUIs), whether you’re the freshest greenhorn or a seasoned veteran. You can use it to switch your internet-connected lights on schedule, or at the touch of a button through a web-app available to any device on your home network. You can use it as an information dashboard for the weather forecast, latest Hackaday articles, bus schedules, or all of them at once. At a glance it abstracts away the complexity of writing Javascript, while also making it simple to dive under hood and use your 1337 haxor skills to add your own code. You can get this up and running in less than an hour and I’m going to tackle that as well as examples for playing with MQTT, setting up a web GUI, and writing to log files. To make Node-RED persistent on your network you need a server, but it’s lean enough to run from a Raspberry Pi without issue, and it’s even installed by default in BeagleBone distributions. Code for all examples in this guide can be found in the tutorial repository. Let’s dive in! KAL and Ceska launch first Windows 10 ATM on Linux Hypervisor read more

2017 Data Breach Will Cost Equifax at Least $1.38 Billion

2020-01-15 23:00:00

Company agrees to set aside a minimum of $380.5 million as breach compensation and spend another $1 billion on transforming its information security over the next five years. The 147 million US consumers affected by the breach have one week from today to file a claim.

6 Git mistakes you will make — and how to fix them

2020-01-15 23:00:00

InfoWorld: Shot yourself in the foot with the world's most popular version control system? Here's how to fix it

How to Set the Terminal as a Transparent Wallpaper in Kubuntu

2020-01-15 22:59:02

Setting the terminal as a transparent wallpaper is a great way to use the terminal and enjoy your wallpaper at the same time. Here's how to do it in Kubuntu

How To Synchronize Files And Directories Using Zaloha.sh

2020-01-15 22:47:08

Mozilla lays off 70 as it waits for new products to generate revenue

2020-01-15 22:00:00

TechCrunch: Cash rich Mozilla ditches devs

Firefox 73 Enters Development with New Default Zoom Settings, Improved Audio

2020-01-15 21:30:13

With the Firefox 72 release hitting the stable update channel last week, Mozilla kicked off the development of the next version of its popular, open-source and cross-platform web browser, Firefox 73. Now that Mozilla has adopted the monthly release cycle for new Firefox versions, the Open Source company aims to address various bugs and improve the functionality, reliability, and stability of its web browser for all supported platforms. Firefox 72 introduced Picture-in-Picture support for Linux and macOS users, the ability to block fingerprinting scripts by default on all supported platforms using the built-in Enhanced Tracking Protection feature, new developer features, and removed the annoying notification request pop-ups. With the Firefox 73 release, Mozilla adds the ability to set a default zoom level that's applicable for all websites. The new option will be implemented in the Preferences page under the "Language and Appearance" section, allowing users to scale the zoom levels up or down from the default 100% setting. read more

Google Lets iPhone Users Turn Device into Security Key

2020-01-15 21:15:00

The iPhone can now be used in lieu of a physical security key as a means of protecting Google accounts.

Reviews of Kubuntu Focus Laptop Coming Out Today

2020-01-15 21:00:45

Kubuntu Focus Offers The Most Polished KDE Laptop Experience We've Seen Yet As we mentioned back in December, a Kubuntu-powered laptop is launching with the blessing of Canonical and the Kubuntu Community Council. That laptop, the Kubuntu Focus, will begin shipping at the beginning of February while the pre-orders opened today as well as the embargo lift. We've been testing out the Kubuntu Focus the last several weeks and it's quite a polished KDE laptop experience for those wanting to enjoy KDE Plasma for a portable computing experience without having to tweak the laptop for optimal efficiency or other constraints. Kubuntu Focus Linux Laptop Is Now Available for Pre-Order, Ships Early February The previously announced Kubuntu Focus Linux laptop is now available for pre-order and has a shipping date and a price tag for those who want a premium computer. Unveiled last month during the Christmas holidays, the Kubuntu Focus laptop is a collaboration between Kubuntu, Tuxedo Computers, and MindShareManagement Inc., and it aims to be the first-ever officially recognized Kubuntu Linux laptop targeted mainly at gamers, power users, and developers. Kubuntu Focus is a premium and very powerful device that comes pre-installed with the latest Kubuntu release, an official Ubuntu flavor featuring the KDE Plasma Desktop environment, some of the most popular Open Source software, and astonishing hardware components. Today, Kubuntu announced on Twitter that the Kubuntu Focus laptop is now available for pre-order with a price tag starting at $2,395.00 USD for the base model, which features 32GB of RAM, an Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 graphics card, and one power supply, but the laptop can go for up to $3,665.00 USD. Unboxing of the Kubuntu Focus Laptop I got a chance to review the Kubuntu Focus laptop and this is the Unboxing and First Impressions video for it. read more

Microsoft's on Edge and you could be, too: Chromium-based browser exits beta – with teething problems

2020-01-15 20:41:11

Redmond loves Linux so much this Internet-Explorer-replacement is for Windows, macOS only right now Microsoft's Edge browser, retooled to run on Chromium's open source foundation, has shed its beta designation and entered general release on Wednesday, promising performance, productivity, privacy, and value – a word which here means Microsoft Rewards gift card points for using Bing and access to so-called Premium News.…

Download Packages With Dependencies Locally In Ubuntu

2020-01-15 20:30:21

Download packages with dependencies locally in Ubuntu and its derivatives.

Kubuntu Focus Offers The Most Polished KDE Laptop Experience We've Seen Yet

2020-01-15 20:20:00

As we mentioned back in December, a Kubuntu-powered laptop is launching with the blessing of Canonical and the Kubuntu Community Council. That laptop, the Kubuntu Focus, will begin shipping at the beginning of February while the pre-orders opened today as well as the embargo lift. We've been testing out the Kubuntu Focus the last several weeks and it's quite a polished KDE laptop experience for those wanting to enjoy KDE Plasma for a portable computing experience without having to tweak the laptop for optimal efficiency or other constraints.

rsync compatibility

2020-01-15 20:14:43

Our rsync package was shipped with bundled zlib to provide compatibility with the old-style --compress option up to version 3.1.0. Version 3.1.1 was released on 2014-06-22 and is shipped by all major distributions now. So we decided to finally drop the bundled library and ship a package with system zlib. This also fixes security issues, actual ones and in future. Go and blame those running old versions if you encounter errors with rsync 3.1.3-3.